1

If I have small table with an foreign key(FK) to a large table. When I delete elements from the large table, postgres spends a lot of time calling the trigger for the FK constraint.

Example:

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS large_table CASCADE;
DROP TABLE IF EXISTS small_table CASCADE;

CREATE TABLE large_table (
    id serial primary key,
    name text
);

CREATE TABLE small_table (
    id serial primary key,
    large_table_id serial REFERENCES large_table(id) ON DELETE CASCADE
);

INSERT INTO
    large_table (name)
SELECT
    md5(random() :: text)
FROM
    generate_series(1, 500000) s(i);

-- (in reality we'll be deleting a subset of rows)
EXPLAIN ANALYZE DELETE FROM "large_table"; 

Delete on large_table  (cost=0.00..9459.09 rows=529209 width=6) (actual time=516.400..516.400 rows=0 loops=1)
  ->  Seq Scan on large_table  (cost=0.00..9459.09 rows=529209 width=6) (actual time=0.013..57.192 rows=500000 loops=1)
Planning Time: 0.055 ms
Trigger for constraint small_table_large_table_id_fkey: time=2272.971 calls=500000
Execution Time: 2810.341 ms

Even though there is no data in in the small_table, postgres is spending ~2 seconds Trigger for constraint small_table_large_table_id_fkey. Is there a way to optimize this without disabling triggers all together on the table?

Postgresql 12.1

1

That is a time of 0.005 milliseconds per check, which is not so bad in my opinion.

You cannot skip the check if you want to maintain referential integrity.

As a superuser, you could do

BEGIN;
SET LOCAL session_replication_role = replica;
DELETE FROM large_table;
COMMIT;

That would disable all triggers including the ones that guarantee referential integrity, so you can potentially cause data corruption that way. You have been warned.

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