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I'm referring to the original (Donald Shell's) algorithm. I'm trying to make a subjective sort based on shell sort. I already made all the logic, where it is exactly the same as the shell sort, but instead of the computer calculate what is greater, the user determines subjectively what is greater. But I would like to display a percentage or something to the user know how far in the sorting it is already. That's why I want to find a way to know it.

What is the formula to get the number of passes in a shell sort? I noticed it the number is not fixed, so what would be the minimum and maximum? N and N^2? Or maybe if you have an idea of how it is the best way to display the progress of the sorting, I will really appreciate it.

PS: It is not about the number of comparisons! Also not about time complexity. My question is about the number of passes in the array.

I did this formula displaying it by color. But it doesn't work with the right range.

List<Color> colors = [
    Color(0xFFFF0000),//red
    Color(0xFFFF5500),
    Color(0xFFFFAA00),
    Color(0xFFFFFF00),//yellow
    Color(0xFFAAFF00),
    Color(0xFF00FF00),
    Color(0xFF00FF00),//green
  ];
[...]
style: TextStyle(
                          color: colors[(((pass - 1) * (colors.length - 1)) /
                                  sqrt(a.length).ceil())
                              .floor()]),
[...]
  • Define "not working". Show your code and explain the problem. Time complexity depends on algorithm, and you didn't show us yours. – underscore_d Jun 18 at 14:53
  • I'm surprised that a search for computational complexity of shell sort didn't lead you to an answer to your question. Or, if you have been searching other terms, try that one. – High Performance Mark Jun 18 at 15:02
  • True, and "time complexity" as I indicated is another, although it's more a summary of how many repetitions are needed than an indication of time (a single repetition could be coded badly to be incredibly slow!) - which luckily sounds like what the OP is looking for. – underscore_d Jun 18 at 15:13
  • @High Performance Mark Time complexity refers to the number of comparisons. But I mean how many times it passes through the array, not how many comparisons or about the time complexity of it. – Hyung Tae Carapeto Figur Jun 18 at 17:23
  • @underscore_d I think I didn't explain myself well, so you couldn't understand what I meant. I edited the question, please review it. – Hyung Tae Carapeto Figur Jun 18 at 18:08
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Because one pass is the application of one element of the gap sequence, the number of passes depends on the used gap sequence.

If you use Shell's original gap sequence of powers of two, the number of passes is approximately the binary logarithms of the input size.

You can read more about other proposed gap sequences in the wikipedia article on Shell Sort: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shellsort

| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you. Yes, I'm refering to the original (Donald Shell's) algorithm. I'm trying to make a subjective sort based on shell sort. I already made all the logic, where it is exactly the same as the shell sort, but instead of the computer calculate what is greater, the user determine subjectively what is greater. But I would like to display a percentage or something to the user know how far in the sorting it is already. That's why I want to find a way to know it. – Hyung Tae Carapeto Figur Jun 18 at 17:26
  • Yes!! I used the log2(n) and it worked perfectly! It shows the progress of the sorting based on the passes. I tried with several random generated numbers and sizes of lists, and until now all worked perfectly. I basically used this cross multiplication relating the progress with colors from red to green. colors[(((pass - 1) * (colors.length - 1))/(log(a.length) / log(2)).floor()).floor()]) – Hyung Tae Carapeto Figur Jun 18 at 20:31

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