This is a follow-up to my previous question on pretty-printing STL containers, for which we managed to develop a very elegant and fully general solution.


In this next step, I would like to include pretty-printing for std::tuple<Args...>, using variadic templates (so this is strictly C++11). For std::pair<S,T>, I simply say

std::ostream & operator<<(std::ostream & o, const std::pair<S,T> & p)
{
  return o << "(" << p.first << ", " << p.second << ")";
}

What is the analogous construction for printing a tuple?

I've tried various bits of template argument stack unpacking, passing indices around and using SFINAE to discover when I'm at the last element, but with no success. I shan't burden you with my broken code; the problem description is hopefully straight-forward enough. Essentially, I'd like the following behaviour:

auto a = std::make_tuple(5, "Hello", -0.1);
std::cout << a << std::endl; // prints: (5, "Hello", -0.1)

Bonus points for including the same level of generality (char/wchar_t, pair delimiters) as the the previous question!

  • Has someone put any of the code here into a library? Or even an .hpp-with-everything-in which one could grab and use? – einpoklum Jul 16 '15 at 18:53
  • @einpoklum: Maybe cxx-prettyprint? That's what I needed that code for. – Kerrek SB Jul 16 '15 at 19:11
up vote 74 down vote accepted

Yay, indices~

namespace aux{
template<std::size_t...> struct seq{};

template<std::size_t N, std::size_t... Is>
struct gen_seq : gen_seq<N-1, N-1, Is...>{};

template<std::size_t... Is>
struct gen_seq<0, Is...> : seq<Is...>{};

template<class Ch, class Tr, class Tuple, std::size_t... Is>
void print_tuple(std::basic_ostream<Ch,Tr>& os, Tuple const& t, seq<Is...>){
  using swallow = int[];
  (void)swallow{0, (void(os << (Is == 0? "" : ", ") << std::get<Is>(t)), 0)...};
}
} // aux::

template<class Ch, class Tr, class... Args>
auto operator<<(std::basic_ostream<Ch, Tr>& os, std::tuple<Args...> const& t)
    -> std::basic_ostream<Ch, Tr>&
{
  os << "(";
  aux::print_tuple(os, t, aux::gen_seq<sizeof...(Args)>());
  return os << ")";
}

Live example on Ideone.


For the delimiter stuff, just add these partial specializations:

// Delimiters for tuple
template<class... Args>
struct delimiters<std::tuple<Args...>, char> {
  static const delimiters_values<char> values;
};

template<class... Args>
const delimiters_values<char> delimiters<std::tuple<Args...>, char>::values = { "(", ", ", ")" };

template<class... Args>
struct delimiters<std::tuple<Args...>, wchar_t> {
  static const delimiters_values<wchar_t> values;
};

template<class... Args>
const delimiters_values<wchar_t> delimiters<std::tuple<Args...>, wchar_t>::values = { L"(", L", ", L")" };

and change the operator<< and print_tuple accordingly:

template<class Ch, class Tr, class... Args>
auto operator<<(std::basic_ostream<Ch, Tr>& os, std::tuple<Args...> const& t)
    -> std::basic_ostream<Ch, Tr>&
{
  typedef std::tuple<Args...> tuple_t;
  if(delimiters<tuple_t, Ch>::values.prefix != 0)
    os << delimiters<tuple_t,char>::values.prefix;

  print_tuple(os, t, aux::gen_seq<sizeof...(Args)>());

  if(delimiters<tuple_t, Ch>::values.postfix != 0)
    os << delimiters<tuple_t,char>::values.postfix;

  return os;
}

And

template<class Ch, class Tr, class Tuple, std::size_t... Is>
void print_tuple(std::basic_ostream<Ch, Tr>& os, Tuple const& t, seq<Is...>){
  using swallow = int[];
  char const* delim = delimiters<Tuple, Ch>::values.delimiter;
  if(!delim) delim = "";
  (void)swallow{0, (void(os << (Is == 0? "" : delim) << std::get<Is>(t)), 0)...};
}
  • @Kerrek: I'm currently testing & fixing myself, I get weird output on Ideone though. – Xeo Jun 5 '11 at 21:03
  • Make the base case 1, not 0, to avoid the extraneous delimiter... – Kerrek SB Jun 5 '11 at 21:04
  • 1
    @Thomas: You can't just use class Tuple for the operator<< overload - it would get picked for any and all things. It would need a constraint, which kinda implies the need for some kind of variadic arguments. – Xeo Mar 19 '13 at 22:56
  • 1
    @DanielFrey: That's a solved problem, list-initialization guarantees left-to-right order: swallow{(os << get<Is>(t))...};. – Xeo Mar 30 '13 at 2:11
  • 5
    @Xeo I borrowed your swallow for cppreference, if you don't mind. – Cubbi May 17 '13 at 17:51

I got this working fine in C++11 (gcc 4.7). There are I am sure some pitfalls I have not considered but I think the code is easy to read and and not complicated. The only thing that may be strange is the "guard" struct tuple_printer that ensure that we terminate when the last element is reached. The other strange thing may be sizeof...(Types) that return the number of types in Types type pack. It is used to determine the index of the last element (size...(Types) - 1).

template<typename Type, unsigned N, unsigned Last>
struct tuple_printer {

    static void print(std::ostream& out, const Type& value) {
        out << std::get<N>(value) << ", ";
        tuple_printer<Type, N + 1, Last>::print(out, value);
    }
};

template<typename Type, unsigned N>
struct tuple_printer<Type, N, N> {

    static void print(std::ostream& out, const Type& value) {
        out << std::get<N>(value);
    }

};

template<typename... Types>
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, const std::tuple<Types...>& value) {
    out << "(";
    tuple_printer<std::tuple<Types...>, 0, sizeof...(Types) - 1>::print(out, value);
    out << ")";
    return out;
}
  • 1
    Yeah, that looks sensible - perhaps with another specialization for the empty tuple, for completeness. – Kerrek SB Jul 4 '13 at 15:24

I'm surprised the implementation on cppreference has not already been posted here, so I'll do it for posterity. It's hidden in the doc for std::tuple_cat so it's not easy to find. It uses a guard struct like some of the other solutions here, but I think theirs is ultimately simpler and easier-to-follow.

#include <iostream>
#include <tuple>
#include <string>

// helper function to print a tuple of any size
template<class Tuple, std::size_t N>
struct TuplePrinter {
    static void print(const Tuple& t) 
    {
        TuplePrinter<Tuple, N-1>::print(t);
        std::cout << ", " << std::get<N-1>(t);
    }
};

template<class Tuple>
struct TuplePrinter<Tuple, 1> {
    static void print(const Tuple& t) 
    {
        std::cout << std::get<0>(t);
    }
};

template<class... Args>
void print(const std::tuple<Args...>& t) 
{
    std::cout << "(";
    TuplePrinter<decltype(t), sizeof...(Args)>::print(t);
    std::cout << ")\n";
}
// end helper function

And a test:

int main()
{
    std::tuple<int, std::string, float> t1(10, "Test", 3.14);
    int n = 7;
    auto t2 = std::tuple_cat(t1, std::make_pair("Foo", "bar"), t1, std::tie(n));
    n = 10;
    print(t2);
}

Output:

(10, Test, 3.14, Foo, bar, 10, Test, 3.14, 10)

Live Demo

In C++17 we can accomplish this with a little less code by taking advantage of Fold expressions, particularly a unary left fold:

template<class TupType, size_t... I>
void print(const TupType& _tup, std::index_sequence<I...>)
{
    std::cout << "(";
    (..., (std::cout << (I == 0? "" : ", ") << std::get<I>(_tup)));
    std::cout << ")\n";
}

template<class... T>
void print (const std::tuple<T...>& _tup)
{
    print(_tup, std::make_index_sequence<sizeof...(T)>());
}

Live Demo outputs:

(5, Hello, -0.1)

given

auto a = std::make_tuple(5, "Hello", -0.1);
print(a);

Explanation

Our unary left fold is of the form

... op pack

where op in our scenario is the comma operator, and pack is the expression containing our tuple in an unexpanded context like:

(..., (std::cout << std::get<I>(myTuple))

So if I have a tuple like so:

auto myTuple = std::make_tuple(5, "Hello", -0.1);

And a std::integer_sequence whose values are specified by a non-type template (see above code)

size_t... I

Then the expression

(..., (std::cout << std::get<I>(myTuple))

Gets expanded into

((std::cout << std::get<0>(myTuple)), (std::cout << std::get<1>(myTuple))), (std::cout << std::get<2>(myTuple));

Which will print

5Hello-0.1

Which is gross, so we need to do some more trickery to add a comma separator to be printed first unless it's the first element.

To accomplish that, we modify the pack portion of the fold expression to print " ," if the current index I is not the first, hence the (I == 0? "" : ", ") portion*:

(..., (std::cout << (I == 0? "" : ", ") << std::get<I>(_tup)));

And now we'll get

5, Hello, -0.1

Which looks nicer (Note: I wanted similar output as this answer)

*Note: You could do the comma separation in a variety of ways than what I ended up with. I initially added commas conditionally after instead of before by testing against std::tuple_size<TupType>::value - 1, but that was too long, so I tested instead against sizeof...(I) - 1, but in the end I copied Xeo and we ended up with what I've got.

  • You could also use if constexpr for the base case. – Kerrek SB Dec 15 '16 at 19:51
  • @KerrekSB: For deciding whether to print a comma? Not a bad idea, wish it came in ternary. – AndyG Dec 15 '16 at 20:31
  • A conditional expression is already a potential constant expression, so what you have is already good :-) – Kerrek SB Dec 15 '16 at 20:36

Based upon example on The C++ Programming Language By Bjarne Stroustrup, page 817:

#include <tuple>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <type_traits>
template<size_t N>
struct print_tuple{
    template<typename... T>static typename std::enable_if<(N<sizeof...(T))>::type
    print(std::ostream& os, const std::tuple<T...>& t) {
        char quote = (std::is_convertible<decltype(std::get<N>(t)), std::string>::value) ? '"' : 0;
        os << ", " << quote << std::get<N>(t) << quote;
        print_tuple<N+1>::print(os,t);
        }
    template<typename... T>static typename std::enable_if<!(N<sizeof...(T))>::type
    print(std::ostream&, const std::tuple<T...>&) {
        }
    };
std::ostream& operator<< (std::ostream& os, const std::tuple<>&) {
    return os << "()";
    }
template<typename T0, typename ...T> std::ostream&
operator<<(std::ostream& os, const std::tuple<T0, T...>& t){
    char quote = (std::is_convertible<T0, std::string>::value) ? '"' : 0;
    os << '(' << quote << std::get<0>(t) << quote;
    print_tuple<1>::print(os,t);
    return os << ')';
    }

int main(){
    std::tuple<> a;
    auto b = std::make_tuple("One meatball");
    std::tuple<int,double,std::string> c(1,1.2,"Tail!");
    std::cout << a << std::endl;
    std::cout << b << std::endl;
    std::cout << c << std::endl;
    }

Output:

()
("One meatball")
(1, 1.2, "Tail!")

and here is another implementation:

https://github.com/galaxyeye/atlas/blob/master/atlas/io/tuple.h

with the test code :

https://github.com/galaxyeye/atlas/blob/master/libs/serialization/test/tuple.cpp

enjoy :)

  • Nice, thanks - you should make the output stream templated, though :-) – Kerrek SB Aug 9 '13 at 8:59

Another one, similar to @Tony Olsson's, including a specialization for the empty tuple, as suggested by @Kerrek SB.

#include <tuple>
#include <iostream>

template<class Ch, class Tr, size_t I, typename... TS>
struct tuple_printer
{
    static void print(std::basic_ostream<Ch,Tr> & out, const std::tuple<TS...> & t)
    {
        tuple_printer<Ch, Tr, I-1, TS...>::print(out, t);
        if (I < sizeof...(TS))
            out << ",";
        out << std::get<I>(t);
    }
};
template<class Ch, class Tr, typename... TS>
struct tuple_printer<Ch, Tr, 0, TS...>
{
    static void print(std::basic_ostream<Ch,Tr> & out, const std::tuple<TS...> & t)
    {
        out << std::get<0>(t);
    }
};
template<class Ch, class Tr, typename... TS>
struct tuple_printer<Ch, Tr, -1, TS...>
{
    static void print(std::basic_ostream<Ch,Tr> & out, const std::tuple<TS...> & t)
    {}
};
template<class Ch, class Tr, typename... TS>
std::ostream & operator<<(std::basic_ostream<Ch,Tr> & out, const std::tuple<TS...> & t)
{
    out << "(";
    tuple_printer<Ch, Tr, sizeof...(TS) - 1, TS...>::print(out, t);
    return out << ")";
}

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