220

Is it bad to check if an array is not empty by using any? method?

a = [1,2,3]

a.any?
=> true

a.clear

a.any?
=> false

Or is it better to use unless a.empty? ?

0

6 Answers 6

276

any? isn't the same as not empty? in some cases.

>> [nil, 1].any?
=> true
>> [nil, nil].any?
=> false

From the documentation:

If the block is not given, Ruby adds an implicit block of {|obj| obj} (that is any? will return true if at least one of the collection members is not false or nil).

4
  • 10
    Is there any function opposite to empty? ?
    – RocketR
    Commented Nov 17, 2012 at 0:00
  • 16
    @RocketR you might want to checkout present? method.
    – dantheta
    Commented Dec 3, 2012 at 17:54
  • 21
    @dantastic #present? is Rails-only. In pure Ruby you'll get NoMethodError: undefined method 'present?' for Array.
    – RocketR
    Commented Dec 3, 2012 at 21:41
  • 6
    Not exactly Rails-only, Active Support can be used without rails, just need to require 'activesupport'.
    – S. A.
    Commented Mar 11, 2015 at 22:50
96

The difference between an array evaluating its values to true or if its empty.

The method empty? comes from the Array class
http://ruby-doc.org/core-2.0.0/Array.html#method-i-empty-3F

It's used to check if the array contains something or not. This includes things that evaluate to false, such as nil and false.

>> a = []
=> []
>> a.empty?
=> true
>> a = [nil, false]
=> [nil, false]
>> a.empty?
=> false
>> a = [nil]
=> [nil]
>> a.empty?
=> false

The method any? comes from the Enumerable module.
http://ruby-doc.org/core-2.0.0/Enumerable.html#method-i-any-3F

It's used to evaluate if "any" value in the array evaluates to true. Similar methods to this are none?, all? and one?, where they all just check to see how many times true could be evaluated. which has nothing to do with the count of values found in a array.

case 1

>> a = []
=> []
>> a.any?
=> false
>> a.one?
=> false
>> a.all?
=> true
>> a.none?
=> true

case 2

>> a = [nil, true]
=> [nil, true]
>> a.any?
=> true
>> a.one?
=> true
>> a.all?
=> false
>> a.none?
=> false

case 3

>> a = [true, true]
=> [true, true]
>> a.any?
=> true
>> a.one?
=> false
>> a.all?
=> true
>> a.none?
=> false
36

Avoid any? for large arrays.

  • any? is O(n)
  • empty? is O(1)

any? does not check the length but actually scans the whole array for truthy elements.

static VALUE
rb_ary_any_p(VALUE ary)
{
  long i, len = RARRAY_LEN(ary);
  const VALUE *ptr = RARRAY_CONST_PTR(ary);

  if (!len) return Qfalse;
  if (!rb_block_given_p()) {
    for (i = 0; i < len; ++i) if (RTEST(ptr[i])) return Qtrue;
  }
  else {
    for (i = 0; i < RARRAY_LEN(ary); ++i) {
        if (RTEST(rb_yield(RARRAY_AREF(ary, i)))) return Qtrue;
    }
  }
  return Qfalse;
}

empty? on the other hand checks the length of the array only.

static VALUE
rb_ary_empty_p(VALUE ary)
{
  if (RARRAY_LEN(ary) == 0)
    return Qtrue;
  return Qfalse;
}

The difference is relevant if you have "sparse" arrays that start with lots of nil values, like for example an array that was just created.

1
  • 1
    In this use case the difference is relevant only if you have "sparse" arrays that start with lots of nil values, with "normal" arrays any? without block returns at the first element, so the complexity is still O(1) like the empty? method Commented Feb 7, 2018 at 10:35
34

Prefixing the statement with an exclamation mark will let you know whether the array is not empty. So in your case -

a = [1,2,3]
!a.empty?
=> true
4
  • 29
    Double negation? Are you serious?
    – 3lvis
    Commented Feb 7, 2014 at 10:17
  • 31
    He is so not not serious! Commented Apr 15, 2015 at 19:55
  • 5
    Hehe. Double negation is not ideal, just seems more readable in this specific case. Commented Mar 13, 2016 at 0:42
  • 14
    The double negative was part of the original question "Check for array not empty". This answers the question. Commented Oct 30, 2016 at 23:16
6

I'll suggest using unlessand blank to check is empty or not.

Example :

unless a.blank?
  a = "Is not empty"
end

This will know 'a' empty or not. If 'a' is blank then the below code will not run.

2
  • 5
    #blank? is part of Rails. If they're already using Rails, #present? is the negation of #blank? anyway.
    – Eva
    Commented May 20, 2016 at 14:52
  • This is a question about arrays, not strings.
    – Chiara Ani
    Commented Aug 28, 2020 at 15:08
1

I don't think it's bad to use any? at all. I use it a lot. It's clear and concise.

However if you are concerned about all nil values throwing it off, then you are really asking if the array has size > 0. In that case, this dead simple extension (NOT optimized, monkey-style) would get you close.

Object.class_eval do

  def size?
    respond_to?(:size) && size > 0
  end

end

> "foo".size?
 => true
> "".size?
 => false
> " ".size?
 => true
> [].size?
 => false
> [11,22].size?
 => true
> [nil].size?
 => true

This is fairly descriptive, logically asking "does this object have a size?". And it's concise, and it doesn't require ActiveSupport. And it's easy to build on.

Some extras to think about:

  1. This is not the same as present? from ActiveSupport.
  2. You might want a custom version for String, that ignores whitespace (like present? does).
  3. You might want the name length? for String or other types where it might be more descriptive.
  4. You might want it custom for Integer and other Numeric types, so that a logical zero returns false.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.