6

I would expect gsub and stringr::str_replace_all to return the same result in the following, but only gsub returns the intended result. I am developing a lesson to demonstrate str_replace_all so I would like to know why it returns a different result here.

txt <- ".72   2.51\n2015**   2.45   2.30   2.00   1.44   1.20   1.54   1.84   1.56   1.94   1.47   0.86   1.01\n2016**   1.53   1.75   2.40   2.62   2.35   2.03   1.25   0.52   0.45   0.56   1.88   1.17\n2017**   0.77   0.70   0.74   1.12   0.88   0.79   0.10   0.09   0.32   0.05   0.15   0.50\n2018**   0.70   0"

gsub(".*2017|2018.*", "", txt)

stringr::str_replace_all(txt, ".*2017|2018.*", "")

gsub returns the intended output (everything before and including 2017, and after and including 2018, has been removed).

output of gsub (intended)

[1] "**   0.77   0.70   0.74   1.12   0.88   0.79   0.10   0.09   0.32   0.05   0.15   0.50\n"

However str_replace_all only replaces the 2017 and 2018 but leaves the rest, even though the same pattern is used for both.

output of str_replace_all (not intended)

[1] ".72   2.51\n2015**   2.45   2.30   2.00   1.44   1.20   1.54   1.84   1.56   1.94   1.47   0.86   1.01\n2016**   1.53   1.75   2.40   2.62   2.35   2.03   1.25   0.52   0.45   0.56   1.88   1.17\n**   0.77   0.70   0.74   1.12   0.88   0.79   0.10   0.09   0.32   0.05   0.15   0.50\n"

Why is this the case?

8
0

It is because gsub has its argument perl set to FALSE as default, whereas stringr always uses TRUE under the hood. If you set perl to TRUE in gsub it will yield the same result.

library(stringr)
txt <- ".72   2.51\n2015**   2.45   2.30   2.00   1.44   1.20   1.54   1.84   1.56   1.94   1.47   0.86   1.01\n2016**   1.53   1.75   2.40   2.62   2.35   2.03   1.25   0.52   0.45   0.56   1.88   1.17\n2017**   0.77   0.70   0.74   1.12   0.88   0.79   0.10   0.09   0.32   0.05   0.15   0.50\n2018**   0.70   0"

(base <- gsub(".*2017|2018.*", "", txt, perl = TRUE))
#> [1] ".72   2.51\n2015**   2.45   2.30   2.00   1.44   1.20   1.54   1.84   1.56   1.94   1.47   0.86   1.01\n2016**   1.53   1.75   2.40   2.62   2.35   2.03   1.25   0.52   0.45   0.56   1.88   1.17\n**   0.77   0.70   0.74   1.12   0.88   0.79   0.10   0.09   0.32   0.05   0.15   0.50\n"

(strng_r <- str_replace_all(txt, ".*2017|2018.*", ""))
#> [1] ".72   2.51\n2015**   2.45   2.30   2.00   1.44   1.20   1.54   1.84   1.56   1.94   1.47   0.86   1.01\n2016**   1.53   1.75   2.40   2.62   2.35   2.03   1.25   0.52   0.45   0.56   1.88   1.17\n**   0.77   0.70   0.74   1.12   0.88   0.79   0.10   0.09   0.32   0.05   0.15   0.50\n"

identical(base, strng_r)
#> [1] TRUE

Created on 2020-06-19 by the reprex package (v0.3.0)

If you want to use stringr you could extract the expression you are looking for using str_match in combination with lookaheads.

library(stringr)
txt <- ".72   2.51\n2015**   2.45   2.30   2.00   1.44   1.20   1.54   1.84   1.56   1.94   1.47   0.86   1.01\n2016**   1.53   1.75   2.40   2.62   2.35   2.03   1.25   0.52   0.45   0.56   1.88   1.17\n2017**   0.77   0.70   0.74   1.12   0.88   0.79   0.10   0.09   0.32   0.05   0.15   0.50\n2018**   0.70   0"

str_match(txt, "(?<=2017).*.(?=\\n2018)")
#>      [,1]                                                                                    
#> [1,] "**   0.77   0.70   0.74   1.12   0.88   0.79   0.10   0.09   0.32   0.05   0.15   0.50"

Created on 2020-06-19 by the reprex package (v0.3.0)

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    That's helpful but how do I modify the str_replace_all function to get the default result of gsub with perl = FALSE? – qdread Jun 19 at 14:08
  • 1
    You could use look aheads to match your expression (instead of replacing it with ""). – TimTeaFan Jun 19 at 14:33

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