2

I have a Flask backend which generates an image based on some user input, and sends this image to the client side using the send_file() function of Flask.

This is the Python server code:

@app.route('/image',methods=['POST'])
def generate_image():
    cont = request.get_json()
    t=cont['text']
    print(cont['text'])
    name = pic.create_image(t) //A different function which generates the image
    time.sleep(0.5)
    return send_file(f"{name}.png",as_attachment=True,mimetype="image/png")

I want to delete this image from the server after it has been sent to the client.

How do I achieve it?

5 Answers 5

6

Ok I solved it. I used the @app.after_request and used an if condition to check the endpoint,and then deleted the image

@app.after_request
def delete_image(response):
    global image_name
    if request.endpoint=="generate_image": //this is the endpoint at which the image gets generated
        os.remove(image_name)
    return response
2
  • Not a good idea, I think. What if a second request to generate_image is made before the first ends? Dec 16, 2023 at 13:20
  • Yes all those steps are handled. I won't get into the exact details since they are not relevant to the original question, but what I basically did was assign IDs to images and had another function queue the delete requests. The os.remove in this case is replaced by this function. The os.remove is added to make the response readable.
    – RishiC
    Dec 17, 2023 at 15:34
2

Another way would be to include the decorator in the route. Thus, you do not need to check for the endpoint. Just import after_this_request from the flask lib.

from flask import after_this_request


@app.route('/image',methods=['POST'])
def generate_image():
    @after_this_request
    def delete_image(response):
        try:
            os.remove(image_name)
        except Exception as ex:
            print(ex)
        return response

    cont = request.get_json()
    t=cont['text']
    print(cont['text'])
    name = pic.create_image(t) //A different function which generates the image
    time.sleep(0.5)
    return send_file(f"{name}.png",as_attachment=True,mimetype="image/png")
4
  • Thanks! Is this a new function added to Flask? During the time the original post was created, I couldn't find this
    – RishiC
    Aug 15, 2022 at 9:49
  • Apparently, this was introduced in Flask 0.9, see the documentation :)
    – rockstaedt
    Aug 16, 2022 at 10:17
  • Hii, I am using the same method, but it's saying that the file is being accessed by another process, any help on that?
    – Ishan Sahu
    Jan 13, 2023 at 6:38
  • Mhm… do you see which process it is? Is it a file you preprocessed in python? Then, I would check if you closed the file.
    – rockstaedt
    Jan 14, 2023 at 7:26
2

After trying all the methods:

  1. @app.after_request is run after every request used and hence not only do we have to narrow it down but also prevent any conflicts
  2. @after_this_request explictly staes

This is useful to modify response objects. The function is passed the response object and has to return the same or a new one.

ie it is run before the request is returned to modify the response, hence it is no different from adding that code at the end of the function instead of return. This only works in Linux because file pointers can exist even after file deletion there.

  1. tempfiles are usually created in system directories and hence only allow deletion of common file extensions any other extensions are denied permission to delete.

So what I found best is to open the image as a file object to read the contents,delete the file and sent this contents over

with open(f"{name}.png", 'rb') as f:
        contents = f.read()
os.remove(f"{name}.png")

return send_file(
        io.BytesIO(contents),
        as_attachment=True,
        attachment_filename=f"{name}.png",
        mimetype="image/png"
    )
0

I had the same issues as some other commenters here:

  1. The @after_this_request solution doesn't help, the file cannot be accessed.
  2. The @app.after_request solution appeared to be too complicated and too obscure in my opinion.

Finally I came up with a solution (sorry the example is from my code, so a little bit different from the original question):

@bp.route('/download/<int:id>')
def download(id: int):
    with db.session() as ses:
        data = ses.scalars( ... fetch data from db by id...).one_or_none()
        if session_data is None:
            abort(404, f"Data with id {id} unknown.")
        try:
            with tempfile.NamedTemporaryFile(delete=False, suffix=".tmp") as fid:
                tmp_file = Path(fid.name)
                write_data_to_file(tmp_file, data)
                fid.seek(0)
                file_content = io.BytesIO(fid.read())
        finally:
            tmp_file.unlink()

        return send_file(
            file_content,
            "application/octet-stream",
            as_attachment=True,
            download_name=f"Data_{id}.tmp")

This will write the data fetched from db to a file (unfortunatey the writer function in my case only accepts file names...). Since my code must also run on Windows, I need to do the delete=False ... .unlink() trick. If this weren't the case, one could also just let the context manager do the job.

The actual solution is in reading the file content into an io.BytesIO buffer and then closing and deleting the file before returning.

-1

You could have another function delete_image() and call it at the bottom of the generate_image() function

1
  • 3
    The return send_file(...) statement exits the generate_image function, so can't add anything below that
    – RishiC
    Jun 20, 2020 at 9:20

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