1

I have one table contains about 3 million rows which structure as follow:

CREATE TABLE `profiles3m` (
  `uid` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `birth_date` date NOT NULL,
  `gender` tinyint(4) NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
  `country` varchar(60) COLLATE utf8mb4_unicode_ci NOT NULL DEFAULT 'ID',
  `city` varchar(60) COLLATE utf8mb4_unicode_ci NOT NULL DEFAULT 'Makassar',
  `created_at` timestamp NULL DEFAULT NULL,
  `premium` tinyint(4) NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
  `updated_at` timestamp NULL DEFAULT NULL,
  `latitude` double NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
  `longitude` double NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
  `orderid` int(11) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`uid`),
  KEY `idx_composites_latitude_longitude_gender_birth_date_created_at` (`latitude`,`longitude`,`country`,`city`,`gender`,`birth_date`) USING BTREE,
  KEY `idx_composites_country_city_gender_birth_date` (`country`,`city`,`gender`,`birth_date`,`orderid`) USING BTREE
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8mb4 COLLATE=utf8mb4_unicode_ci;

I am failed to tell MySQL Optimizer to use all columns in the Composite index definition, seems like the optimizer just ignoring the last column as orderid for ordering purpose which is just a copy of uid column as you might know PRIMARY KEY in InnoDB table cannot use to ordering because it may instruct the optimizer to use the PRIMARY KEY as index rather than using our composite Indexes and that is the idea of the creation of orderid column comes from.

The following SQL query, along with the Explain JSON, plus Show Index statement to show all Index Statistics on the table may help to analysing the caused.

SELECT
    pro.uid 
FROM
    `profiles3m` AS pro 
WHERE
    pro.country = 'INDONESIA' 
    AND pro.city IN ( 'MAKASSAR' ) 
    AND pro.gender = 0 
    AND ( pro.birth_date BETWEEN ( NOW()- INTERVAL 35 YEAR ) AND ( NOW()- INTERVAL 25 YEAR ) ) 
    AND pro.orderid > 0 
ORDER BY
    pro.orderid
LIMIT 30

Explain JSON as follows:

{
  "query_block": {
    "select_id": 1,
    "cost_info": {
      "query_cost": "45278.73"
    },
    "ordering_operation": {
      "using_filesort": true,
      "cost_info": {
        "sort_cost": "19051.43"
      },
      "table": {
        "table_name": "pro",
        "access_type": "range",
        "possible_keys": [
          "idx_composites_country_city_gender_birth_date"
        ],
        "key": "idx_composites_country_city_gender_birth_date",
        "used_key_parts": [
          "country",
          "city",
          "gender",
          "birth_date"
        ],
        "key_length": "488",
        "rows_examined_per_scan": 57160,
        "rows_produced_per_join": 19051,
        "filtered": "33.33",
        "using_index": true,
        "cost_info": {
          "read_cost": "22417.02",
          "eval_cost": "3810.29",
          "prefix_cost": "26227.30",
          "data_read_per_join": "9M"
        },
        "used_columns": [
          "uid",
          "birth_date",
          "gender",
          "country",
          "city",
          "orderid"
        ],
        "attached_condition": "((`restful`.`pro`.`gender` = 0) and (`restful`.`pro`.`country` = 'INDONESIA') and (`restful`.`pro`.`city` = 'MAKASSAR') and (`restful`.`pro`.`birth_date` between <cache>((now() - interval 35 year)) and <cache>((now() - interval 25 year))) and (`restful`.`pro`.`orderid` > 0))"
      }
    }
  }
}

below is for show index statement :

+------------+----------------------------------------------------------------+--------------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+
| Non_unique | Key_name                                                       | Seq_in_index | Column_name | Collation | Cardinality | Sub_part | Packed | Null | Index_type |
+------------+----------------------------------------------------------------+--------------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+
| 0          | PRIMARY                                                        | 1            | uid         | A         | 2984412     |          |        |      | BTREE      |
+------------+----------------------------------------------------------------+--------------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+
| 1          | idx_composites_latitude_longitude_gender_birth_date_created_at | 1            | latitude    | A         | 2934360     |          |        |      | BTREE      |
+------------+----------------------------------------------------------------+--------------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+
| 1          | idx_composites_latitude_longitude_gender_birth_date_created_at | 2            | longitude   | A         | 2984080     |          |        |      | BTREE      |
+------------+----------------------------------------------------------------+--------------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+
| 1          | idx_composites_latitude_longitude_gender_birth_date_created_at | 3            | country     | A         | 2984080     |          |        |      | BTREE      |
+------------+----------------------------------------------------------------+--------------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+
| 1          | idx_composites_latitude_longitude_gender_birth_date_created_at | 4            | city        | A         | 2984080     |          |        |      | BTREE      |
+------------+----------------------------------------------------------------+--------------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+
| 1          | idx_composites_latitude_longitude_gender_birth_date_created_at | 5            | gender      | A         | 2984080     |          |        |      | BTREE      |
+------------+----------------------------------------------------------------+--------------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+
| 1          | idx_composites_latitude_longitude_gender_birth_date_created_at | 6            | birth_date  | A         | 2984080     |          |        |      | BTREE      |
+------------+----------------------------------------------------------------+--------------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+
| 1          | idx_composites_country_city_gender_birth_date                  | 1            | country     | A         | 1           |          |        |      | BTREE      |
+------------+----------------------------------------------------------------+--------------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+
| 1          | idx_composites_country_city_gender_birth_date                  | 2            | city        | A         | 14          |          |        |      | BTREE      |
+------------+----------------------------------------------------------------+--------------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+
| 1          | idx_composites_country_city_gender_birth_date                  | 3            | gender      | A         | 29          |          |        |      | BTREE      |
+------------+----------------------------------------------------------------+--------------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+
| 1          | idx_composites_country_city_gender_birth_date                  | 4            | birth_date  | A         | 362449      |          |        |      | BTREE      |
+------------+----------------------------------------------------------------+--------------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+
| 1          | idx_composites_country_city_gender_birth_date                  | 5            | orderid     | A         | 2984412     |          |        |      | BTREE      |
+------------+----------------------------------------------------------------+--------------+-------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+

What really interesting to look in Explain JSON, they told us if the optimizer can only use four part of our indexed and not surprisingly ordering operation is using filesort as you know means slower execution which is bad for application performance.

idx_composites_country_city_gender_birth_date (country,city,gender,birth_date,orderid)

"ordering_operation": {
          "using_filesort": true,
.....

"key": "idx_composites_country_city_gender_birth_date",    
"used_key_parts": [
              "country",
              "city",
              "gender",
              "birth_date"
            ],

Do i missed something, is it caused by RANGE clause in our WHERE statement?, i've been tested with different combinations of columns in our Composite index sequence for example i am changing orderid column with premium which is a flag column type which only contain 0 and 1, and it worked MySQL Optimizer can utilising all five columns, then why the Optimizer can't do the same with orderid column? is it having to do with Cardinality? i am not so sure, the only thing i can assure is that i must make the ORDER BY working without any impact to the application performance no matter how to do it.

I've been searching the answer in this couple days, but still cannot resolve it. almost forgot to mention MySQL Version in case it helps.

+------------+
| version()  |
+------------+
| 5.7.29-log |
+------------+
1

You noticed that it is only using four of the columns of the index:

    "used_key_parts": [
      "country",
      "city",
      "gender",
      "birth_date"
    ],

Despite the conditions in your WHERE clause referencing all five columns:

WHERE
    pro.country = 'INDONESIA' 
    AND pro.city IN ( 'MAKASSAR' ) 
    AND pro.gender = 0 
    AND ( pro.birth_date BETWEEN ( NOW()- INTERVAL 35 YEAR ) AND ( NOW()- INTERVAL 25 YEAR ) ) 
    AND pro.orderid > 0 

However, there's something different about these conditions. The conditions on country, city, gender are all equality conditions. Once the search finds the subset of the index with those values, then the subset is ordered by birth_date next, and if there are some rows that are tied for birth_date, these are further ordered by orderid.

Just like if you read a telephone book, and you find all people whose last name is "Smith", they are ordered by first name. If there are multiple people who have the same first name as well, they are ordered in the phone book according to their respective phone number.

Smith, Sarah 408-555-1234
Smith, Sarah 408-555-5678

But what if you search for all people with last name Smith and a variety of first names beginning with "S"?

Smith, Sam   408-555-3298
Smith, Sarah 408-555-1234
Smith, Sarah 408-555-5678
Smith, Stan  408-555-4224

These are not in sorted order by phone number. They sort by last name, then by first name, then by phone number only if they are tied in the preceding columns.

If you want to get them sorted by phone number, you could create an index with columns in another order, like last name, phone number, first name.

Smith 408-555-1234 Sarah
Smith 408-555-2020 David
Smith 408-555-3298 Sam
Smith 408-555-4100 Charlie
Smith 408-555-4224 Stan
Smith 408-555-5555 Annette
Smith 408-555-5678 Sarah

Now they are in phone number order, but there are other names among them that don't match your condition for first names beginning with "S". They aren't even in sorted order by first name, because the third column for first name would be sorted only when the first two columns are tied.

This points out a general problem with indexes: You can reorder the columns only for columns involved in equality comparisons. If you want to sort results, you can use the index only if you sort by a column in the index and all preceding columns of the index are used for equality comparisons only.

Once you reference one column in a range comparison, any subsequent columns in the index are ignored for both searching and sorting.

Stated another way: the index can have any number of columns for equality conditions, and the next column of the index can be used for either a range condition, or sorting the results. But not more than one column is used for either of those operations.

You can't optimize everything.


Re your comment: If you have an index on the columns excluding birth_date:

alter table profiles3m add key bk1 (country, city, gender, orderid);

Then the EXPLAIN shows there is no filesort:

EXPLAIN SELECT
    pro.uid 
FROM
    `profiles3m` AS pro 
WHERE
    pro.country = 'INDONESIA' 
    AND pro.city IN ( 'MAKASSAR' ) 
    AND pro.gender = 0 
    AND ( pro.birth_date BETWEEN ( NOW()- INTERVAL 35 YEAR ) AND ( NOW()- INTERVAL 25 YEAR ) ) 
    AND pro.orderid > 0 
ORDER BY
    pro.orderid
LIMIT 30\G

*************************** 1. row ***************************
           id: 1
  select_type: SIMPLE
        table: pro
   partitions: NULL
         type: range
possible_keys: bk1
          key: bk1
      key_len: 489
          ref: NULL
         rows: 1
     filtered: 100.00
        Extra: Using index condition; Using where

(The rows looks low because I'm testing this with an empty table.)

The caveat is that this uses the index to match all rows matched by country, city, gender, and orderid. Then MySQL will evaluate the remaining condition on birth_date the hard way: row by row.

But after that, the optimizer knows that it has already fetched the rows in the index order, so it knows that will naturally be in order by orderid, so it can skip the filesort.

This might or might not be a net win. It depends on how many rows are matched but have to be thrown out by the condition on birth_date. And how costly it is to evaluate that condition for each row. And how does that compare with the savings you would have gotten by using the index to filter by birth_date.

2
  • I am satisfied with your answer, enlighten my thoughts about how the indexed working particularly with composite indexed. Still, I need to find the way to sort the result without filesort or with an acceptable timing execution. – aurakarya Jun 21 '20 at 17:01
  • Responding for your last updated answer which excluding the birth_date column in the indexed, interesting order which I've not test yet sure it works but it might added more times to filtering out the birth_date column. I Think I need sometimes to measure all potential possibilities including this one, your suggestion worth to try in a real table which contains more data. I'll come back updating after testing and hope it to work smoothly without adding too much execution time. – aurakarya Jun 22 '20 at 0:11
2

MySQL cannot use the index for ordering. Your condition on birthdate means that the rows in the index are not ordered by orderid.

I don't think there is a way around that.

6
  • Which means I need to try for other column order combination, how about if I move orderid before birth_date? I've tried the combination but a little slower in execution timing than the current ordering. Query cost telling about it too. – aurakarya Jun 21 '20 at 16:32
  • 1
    @aurakarya . . . How many rows are being returned based on the conditions? The time to sort a few hundred or even a few thousand rows should be acceptable. – Gordon Linoff Jun 21 '20 at 16:43
  • @aurakarya - Have both composite indexes; that way the Optimizer can choose whether to use the one that helps with filtering (at the cost of sorting), or the one that helps with ordering (at the cost of filtering). Sometimes it will pick the better index. – Rick James Jun 21 '20 at 17:20
  • @RickJames I am following your rule's of thumb,at the cost of filtering I found the ordering of the columns (country,city,gender,birth_date) works the best and no other combination beat it, the only thing I still need to added one more field to filtering based on ID as a leftoff for pagination purposes so I don't need to use LIMIT and I'm thinking if I could make it work it means I only need one composite indexed which covering for both the cost at filtering and sorting purposes and not going to have a bad side impact in slow operation for other DML statements like UPDATE and DELETE. – aurakarya Jun 21 '20 at 22:26
  • @RickJames leftoff ID never worked without ORDER BY, your rule's of thumb is very helpful resource for me and I've been learn a lot from it in this couple days. – aurakarya Jun 21 '20 at 22:32

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.