45

Is it possible to build only some part of the code given the type of the template in C++ ? It would be something lake that :

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

template<typename T>
void printType(T param)
{
    #if T == char*
        cout << "char*" << endl;
    #elif T == int
        cout << "int" << endl;
    #else
        cout << "???" << endl;
    #endif
}

int main()
{
    printType("Hello world!");
    printType(1);
    return 0;
}
13

Since C++17 there is a way to do exactly this with if-constexpr. The following compiles since clang-3.9.1, gcc-7.1.0, and recent MSVC compiler 19.11.25506 handles well too with an option /std:c++17.

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

template<typename T>
void printType(T)
{
    if constexpr (std::is_same_v<T, const char*>)
        std::cout << "const char*" << std::endl;
    else if constexpr (std::is_same_v<T, int>)
        std::cout << "int" << std::endl;
    else
        std::cout << "???" << std::endl;
}

int main()
{
    printType("Hello world!");
    printType(1);
    printType(1.1);
    return 0;
}

Output:

const char*
int
???
1
51

Type traits:

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits> // C++0x
//#include <tr1/type_traits> // C++03, use std::tr1

template<typename T>
void printType(T param)
{
  if(std::is_same<T,char*>::value)
        std::cout << "char*" << endl;
  else if(std::is_same<T,int>::value)
        std::cout << "int" << endl;
  else
        std::cout << "???" << endl;
}

Or even better yet, just overload the function:

template<class T>
void printType(T partam){
  std::cout << "???" << endl;
}

void printType(char* partam){
  std::cout << "char*" << endl;
}

void printType(int partam){
  std::cout << "int" << endl;
}

Partial ordering will take care that the correct function is called. Also, overloading is preferred to template specialization in the general case, see this and this artice for why. Might not apply for you if you totally have to print the type, as implicit conversions are considered for overloaded functions.

3
  • 2
    +1 for presenting both alternative (and referring to Sutter's take on template specialization). I will note that the second approach is "better" because more extensible. Notably, for custom types, ADL requires the second approach. – Matthieu M. Jun 6 '11 at 13:28
  • @Matthieu: Yes, but as I said, it might not apply if one is strictly interested in the type, as implicit conversions could be involved. Or is it ambigious if you have both implicit conversion and a fallback template available? – Xeo Jun 6 '11 at 13:32
  • 1
    if an implicit conversion is required, then I think the template function would be a better match. I have some difficulties with the rules for function selection and the conversion sequences :) – Matthieu M. Jun 6 '11 at 14:35
10

Use template specialization:

template<typename T>
void printType(T param)
{
   // code for the general case - or omit the definition to allow only the specialized types
}

template<>
void printType<char*>(char* param)
{
   // code for char*
}

template<>
void printType<int>(int param)
{
   // code for int    
}

// ...
1
6

You can use a specialization. The preprocessor runs before all templates and cannot interact with them.

template<typename T> void printType(T t) {
    std::cout << typeid(T).name(); // fallback
}
template<> void printType<char*>(char* ptr) {
    std::cout << "char*";
}
template<> void printType<int>(int val) {
    std::cout << "int";
}
4
  • 1
    Herb Sutter recommend not to use template specialization (on functions) and to simply use regular overload. See gotw.ca/publications/mill17.htm – Matthieu M. Jun 6 '11 at 13:27
  • 3
    @Matthieu: I don't give a crap what Sutter recommends. My code solves the OP's problem, even if he doesn't take any arguments. Overloading definitely does not. – Puppy Jun 6 '11 at 13:37
  • Thanks for the explanation with the preprocessor. – Congelli501 Jun 6 '11 at 14:08
  • 10
    WoW! Let's be cool :) Overloading definitely solves the problem, as demonstrated by Xeo. The issue with specialization is that if you were (suddenly) to introduce a template <typename T> void printType(T* t); overload after the char* specialization, then char *c; printType(c); would call this new overload rather than the "intuitively expected" specialization: ideone.com/F1xS7 – Matthieu M. Jun 6 '11 at 14:41
3

You use template specification to specify versions of your function to work differently based on its type. For example, you can make a generic version of a function that would work with most types, and make a specific version for e.g. int that will be faster. You'd do it this way:

template <class T>
void printType(T param)
{
    cout<<"Generic version"<<endl;
}
template <>
void printType<int>(int param)
{
    cout<<"Int version"<<endl;
}
template <>
void printType<char>(char param)
{
    cout<<"Char version"<<endl;
}
//Rince and repeat.
1

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