1

I have this script:

#!/bin/bash

mkdir -p a b
echo hello > hello.txt
echo world > world.txt

zip -r -X - *.txt > a/helloworld.zip
sleep 3
touch hello.txt
zip -r -X - *.txt > b/helloworld.zip

cat a/helloworld.zip | md5sum -c <( cat b/helloworld.zip | md5sum -b )

when I run it I get:

$ ./test.sh 
adding: hello.txt (stored 0%)
adding: world.txt (stored 0%)
adding: hello.txt (stored 0%)
adding: world.txt (stored 0%)
-: FAILED
md5sum: WARNING: 1 computed checksum did NOT match

how can I get a deterministic result, depending only on the content of the files and their name and independent of other factors (e.g. modification time, attributes and property)

5
  • 2
    One option could be to replace cat with unzip -p. – kaylum Jun 22 '20 at 22:26
  • Related: zip files without any metadata – Socowi Jun 23 '20 at 7:02
  • @kaylum I tried your suggestion and it works, even if it doesn't take file names into account. I still don't know if this is a problem for me. – mastupristi Jun 23 '20 at 7:08
  • @Socowi I need to use the tools provided by linux. For my use case it is not feasible to write and use a python script – mastupristi Jun 23 '20 at 7:10
  • If you want the file names as well then use -c instead of -p – kaylum Jun 23 '20 at 7:10
1

As mentioned elsewhere, a zip file contains timestamps, and they cannot be omitted. However, it is possible to force them all to a single value, which is useful when producing reproducible builds.

Usually, this is done with the -o and -X flags. -o sets all of the timestamps to the oldest time that's used for any file in the archive, and -X prevents saving additional per-OS timestamps.

If you know that you are only creating files newer than the oldest one, then you need not do anything else. Otherwise, you need to touch the given files to produce an appropriate timestamp. What timestamp you use is not important, as long as it's consistent. For example, if your files are stored in Git, you may wish to use the committer timestamp of the latest commit, or you may prefer to use the epoch; it doesn't matter.

What this looks like is the following:

#!/bin/bash

archive () {
    local archive="$1"
    shift
    # Any suitable timestamp can be used here.
    touch -d 1970-01-01T00:00:00Z "$@"
    TZ=UTC zip -r -oX - "$@" > "$archive"
}

mkdir -p a b
echo hello > hello.txt
echo world > world.txt

archive a/helloworld.zip *.txt
sleep 3
touch hello.txt
archive b/helloworld.zip *.txt

cat a/helloworld.zip | sha256sum -c <( cat b/helloworld.zip | sha256sum -b )

I've also switched to use sha256sum because MD5 is uselessly weak and should not be used.

This is the approach typically used by folks doing reproducible builds like Debian. If necessary, you may need to copy files to a temporary directory in order to avoid modifying timestamps of the original files needlessly. If your arguments are not all glob expressions, you may also want to sort the file names in the archive for reproducibility.

For most parties doing reproducible builds, a consistent behavior with a fixed set of program versions is sufficient, but if you need reproducibility across different versions of zip, then you'll also need to use -Z store, since compression need not be bit-for-bit identical across versions. This is a general problem with deflate and is not limited to zip files.

0
0

The zip file format contains contains this field (see APPNOTE)

   4.4.6 date and time fields: (2 bytes each)

   The date and time are encoded in standard MS-DOS format.
   If input came from standard input, the date and time are
   those at which compression was started for this data. 
   If encrypting the central directory and general purpose bit 
   flag 13 is set indicating masking, the value stored in the 
   Local Header will be zero. MS-DOS time format is different
   from more commonly used computer time formats such as 
   UTC. For example, MS-DOS uses year values relative to 1980
   and 2 second precision.

This means that you approach of checksumming the complete zip file will never work if it is possible for the timestamps to be different.

One possible approach is to use the CRC that is already stored in the zip archive for each file in the archive. This field is a CRC for the uncompressed content.

You can get the CRC and filename by using the -lv option with unzip

$ unzip -lv z.zip
Archive:  z.zip
 Length   Method    Size  Cmpr    Date    Time   CRC-32   Name
--------  ------  ------- ---- ---------- ----- --------  ----
     175  Defl:N      127  27% 2020-06-21 22:34 2268840f  xxx
--------          -------  ---                            -------
     175              127  27%                            1 file

You could run md5sum against that output, but first remove the timestamp data, like so

$ unzip -lv z.zip | grep '^ *[0-9]' | sed -e 's/% [0-9-]* [0-9:]*/ /'
     175  Defl:N      127  27  2268840f  xxx
     175              127  27                           1 file

Here is a proof of concept based on your script

mkdir -p a b
echo hello > hello.txt
echo world > world.txt

zip -r -X - *.txt > a/helloworld.zip
sleep 3
touch hello.txt
zip -r -X - *.txt > b/helloworld.zip

unzip -lv a/helloworld.zip | grep '^ *[0-9]' | sed -e 's/% [0-9-]* [0-9:]*/ /'| md5sum
unzip -lv b/helloworld.zip | grep '^ *[0-9]' | sed -e 's/% [0-9-]* [0-9:]*/ /'| md5sum

Which gives this output

$ sh /tmp/test.sh
  adding: hello.txt (stored 0%)
  adding: world.txt (stored 0%)
  adding: hello.txt (stored 0%)
  adding: world.txt (stored 0%)
be1ee35bf864a4a9f2394cc26d2c3b32  -
be1ee35bf864a4a9f2394cc26d2c3b32  -

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