15

I am trying to get the closest Parent element of an element.

Looking at .closest(), it seems to return the element itself if the selector matches with it:

The closest() method traverses the Element and its parents (heading toward the document root) until it finds a node that matches the provided selector string. Will return itself or the matching ancestor. If no such element exists, it returns null.

(emphasis is mine)

So, what would be the best way to get the closest Parent of an element given a selector?

Example

var el = document.getElementById('foo');
var closestParent = el.closest('div');
console.log(closestParent);
<div>root
  <div>level1
    <div id='foo'>level2</div>
  </div>
</div>

As you can see, el.closest('div'); returns el itself, not its closest parent matching the selector div (level1), which is what I need.

I know that in this case I can simply do closestParent.parentElement, but this is just an example, and I am trying to figure out if it possible to avoid .closest() to return the element itself.

1
  • idea world the parent you want has a class and you use .closest('.theClass') May 12, 2023 at 18:37

2 Answers 2

24

To exclude the current element, get the closest() relative to its parentNode:

var el = document.getElementById('foo');
var closestParent = el.parentNode.closest('div');
console.log(closestParent);
1
  • yeah, you're right, that was easy: just using el.parentNode.closest('div'); is what I was looking for. Thank you!
    – umbe1987
    Jun 23, 2020 at 10:17
2

Document of Closest Here is a DOM, it isn't about parent it's about the nearest Element so you can change your query like below but if you need parents just use parentEelement

var el = document.getElementById('foo');
var closestParent = el.closest('div:not(#foo)');
console.log(closestParent);
<div>root
  <div>level1
    <div id='foo'>level2</div>
  </div>
</div>

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