9

I have two large NumPy arrays each with shape of (519990,) that look something like this:

Order = array([0, 0, 0, 5, 6, 10, 14, 14, 14, 23, 23, 39]) 
Letters = array([A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L])

As you can see the first array is always in ascending and a positive number. I would like to group everything within the Letters to Order to turn out looking like this:

{0:[A,B,C], 5:[D], 6:[E], 10:[F], 14:[G, H, I], 23:[J, K], 39:[L]}

The code I have to do this is:

df = pd.DataFrame()
df['order'] = Order
df['letters'] = Letters

linearDict = df.grouby('order').apply(lambda dfg:dfg.drop('order', axis=1).to_dict(orient='list')).to_dict()

endProduct = {}
for k, v in linearDict.items():
     endProduct[k] = np.array(linearDict[k]['letter'][0:])

enProduct = {0:array([A,B,C]), 5:array([D]), 6:array([E]), 10:array([F]), 14:array([G, H, I]), 23:array([J, K]), 39:array([L])}

My problem is this process is BEYOND slow. It's such a drain on the system that it causes my Jupyter Notebook to crash. Is there a faster way of doing this?

  • Is Order always sorted? – Ch3steR Jun 23 at 17:50
  • Order is not always sorted, – Shion Jun 23 at 18:18
  • first array is always in ascending this means Order is always sorted but now you say Order is not sorted. – Ch3steR Jun 23 at 18:22
  • I guess you are confusing between consecutive and sorted. – Ch3steR Jun 23 at 18:24
  • @Ch3steR yes I'm so sorry, I did not initially word my question thoughtfully enough and realized I made a mistake. it is not sorted, but it is ascending and positive but the number can be repeated various amount of times. – Shion Jun 23 at 18:25
8

We could leverage the fact that Order is sorted, to simply slice Letters after getting the intervaled-indices, like so -

def numpy_slice(Order, Letters):
    Order = np.asarray(Order)
    Letters = np.asarray(Letters)
    idx = np.flatnonzero(np.r_[True,Order[:-1]!=Order[1:],True])
    return {Order[i]:Letters[i:j] for (i,j) in zip(idx[:-1],idx[1:])}

Sample run -

In [66]: Order
Out[66]: array([16, 16, 16, 16, 23, 30, 33, 33, 39, 39, 39, 39, 39, 39, 39])

In [67]: Letters
Out[67]: 
array(['A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E', 'F', 'G', 'H', 'I', 'J', 'K', 'L', 'M',
       'N', 'O'], dtype='<U1')

In [68]: numpy_slice(Order, Letters)
Out[68]: 
{16: array(['A', 'B', 'C', 'D'], dtype='<U1'),
 23: array(['E'], dtype='<U1'),
 30: array(['F'], dtype='<U1'),
 33: array(['G', 'H'], dtype='<U1'),
 39: array(['I', 'J', 'K', 'L', 'M', 'N', 'O'], dtype='<U1')}
| improve this answer | |
  • hi, actually Order is not sorted, I'm sorry I should have been more clear in my post. Order can look like this: ``` Order = array([16, 16, 16, 16, 23, 30, 33, 33, 39, 39, 39, 39,39,39, 39) ``` it will always be in ascending order but can skip around. I will need the corresponding array to group together with the number in the Order array. where it would turn out: ``` {16: [A, B, C, D], 23:[F], 30:[G], 33: [H, I], 39: [J, K, L, M, N, O, P]} ``` – Shion Jun 23 at 17:49
  • Hi, I apologize, I realize I didn't word it correctly. Order will always be ascending and positive number only. So it could be like [1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 5, 10, 11, 11, 22, 25, 25, 30]. – Shion Jun 23 at 17:59
  • @Shion It should still work. Added sample run. Does that make sense? – Divakar Jun 23 at 17:59
  • @Divakar I just ran this and it returned only single-element arrays associated with the Key, but it sure did it fast! – Shion Jun 23 at 18:07
  • @Shion Order and Letters are two NumPy arrays with same lengths, right? – Divakar Jun 23 at 18:08
8

Use:

data = df.groupby('order')['letters'].agg(list).to_dict()

We can further improve the performance by passing sort=False and agg to tuple instead of list:

data = df.groupby('order', sort=False)['letters'].agg(tuple).to_dict()

Result:

# print(data)
{0: ['A', 'B', 'C'], 1: ['D', 'E', 'F'], 2: ['G', 'H', 'I'], 3: ['J', 'K', 'L']}

timeit performance results:

df.shape    
(1200000, 2)

o = np.repeat([0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3], 100000)
l = np.repeat([A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L], 100000)

***Fastest answer***
%%timeit -n10 @Divakar
idx = np.flatnonzero(np.r_[True,o[:-1]!=o[1:],True])
{o[i]:l[i:j] for (i,j) in zip(idx[:-1],idx[1:])}
1.44 ms ± 243 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)
*******************

%%timeit -n10 @Scott
grp = np.cumsum(np.unique(o, return_counts=True)[1])
arr = np.stack(np.split(l, grp)[:-1])
{n: k for n, k in enumerate(arr.tolist())}
38.5 ms ± 699 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

%%timeit -n10 @ shubham 2
data = df.groupby('order', sort=False)['letters'].agg(tuple).to_dict()
118 ms ± 3.12 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

%%timeit -n10 @shubham 1
data = df.groupby('order')['letters'].agg(list).to_dict()
177 ms ± 4.43 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

%%timeit -n10 @anky 1
d = (dict([*chain(*map(dict.items,[{k:[*zip(*g)][1] } 
     for k,g in groupby(zip(o,l),itemgetter(0))]))]))
636 ms ± 23.9 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

%%timeit -n10 @ anky 2
_ = dict([(k,list(zip(*g))[1]) for k,g in groupby(zip(o,l),itemgetter(0))])
659 ms ± 36.3 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

%%timeit -n10 @Ch3ster
new = defaultdict(list)
for k,v in zip(o, l):
    new[k].append(v)
602 ms ± 1.56 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)
| improve this answer | |
  • Hey, shubham can test my approach too and add timeit results? – Ch3steR Jun 23 at 16:40
  • @Ch3steR Sure, I guess you have tested all the answers already. But i will definitely try your answer, give me some time. – Shubham Sharma Jun 23 at 16:42
  • 1
    Thank you but OP's operating on an array of size 500K so, might not be the correct to post my solution so deleted it and it might distract the future reader from the answers you and Scott provided. – Ch3steR Jun 23 at 17:05
  • 1
    @anky yes i will surely add. – Shubham Sharma Jun 23 at 17:28
  • 1
    Good to know @anky, i didn't knew about that. – Shubham Sharma Jul 23 at 17:57
7

Try this:

grp = np.cumsum(np.unique(Order, return_counts=True)[1])
arr = np.stack(np.split(Letters, grp)[:-1])
{n: k for n, k in enumerate(arr.tolist())}

Output:

{0: ['A', 'B', 'C'],
 1: ['D', 'E', 'F'],
 2: ['G', 'H', 'I'],
 3: ['J', 'K', 'L']}
| improve this answer | |
  • I don't think this will work with uneven number in groups... And you might need to sort the arrays first. I think this answer is to narrow need to make it more robust. – Scott Boston Jun 23 at 17:08
  • 2
    hi, thank you so much to everyone for their responses. There are times when the Order array will have [16,16,16,16,16,22,22,33,45] so the result will need to have the arrays of uneven shapes. – Shion Jun 23 at 17:47
5

May be this can be optimized (haven't tested for speed too but should be fast) more but another approach is itertools groupby:

from itertools import chain,groupby
from operator import itemgetter

d = (dict([*chain(*map(dict.items,[{k:[*zip(*g)][1] } 
     for k,g in groupby(zip(Order,Letters),itemgetter(0))]))]))

Or without chain , should be faster than before:

dict([(k,list(zip(*g))[1]) for k,g in groupby(zip(Order,Letters),itemgetter(0))])

{0: ('A', 'B', 'C'),
 1: ('D', 'E', 'F'),
 2: ('G', 'H', 'I'),
 3: ('J', 'K', 'L')}
| improve this answer | |
  • @ShubhamSharma Anky's, yours and my answer are generalized they work with an unsorted and uneven-numbered group. While divakar's and Scott's solutions leverage on the fact that Order is always sorted. – Ch3steR Jun 23 at 17:42
  • @Ch3ster yep.. its generalized and don not required ordering to be maintained. – Shubham Sharma Jun 23 at 17:45

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