10

If I have an ObservableObject in SwiftUI I can refer to it as an @ObservedObject:

class ViewModel: ObservableObject {
    @Published var someText = "Hello World!"
}

struct ContentView: View {
    @ObservedObject var viewModel = ViewModel()
    
    var body: some View {
        Text(viewModel.someText)
    }
}

Or as a @StateObject:

class ViewModel: ObservableObject {
    @Published var someText = "Hello World!"
}

struct ContentView: View {
    @StateObject var viewModel = ViewModel()

    var body: some View {
        Text(viewModel.someText)
    }
}

But what's the actual difference between the two? Are there any situations where one is better than the other, or they are two completely different things?

17
3

@ObservedObject

When a view creates its own @ObservedObject instance it is recreated every time a view is discarded and redrawn:

struct ContentView: View {
  @ObservedObject var viewModel = ViewModel()
}

On the contrary a @State variable will keep its value when a view is redrawn.

@StateObject

A @StateObject is a combination of @ObservedObject and @State - the instance of the ViewModel will be kept and reused even after a view is discarded and redrawn:

struct ContentView: View {
  @StateObject var viewModel = ViewModel()
}

Performance

Although an @ObservedObject can impact the performance if the View is forced to recreate a heavy-weight object often, it should not matter much when the @ObservedObject is not complex.

When to use @ObservedObject

It might appear there is no reason now to use an @ObserverObject, so when should it be used?

You should use @StateObject for any observable properties that you initialize in the view that uses it. If the ObservableObject instance is created externally and passed to the view that uses it mark your property with @ObservedObject.

Note there are too many use-cases possible and sometimes it may be desired to recreate an observable property in your View. In that case it's better to use an @ObservedObject.

Useful links:

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  • It is not clear to me if there is any use case ObservedObject at all, why was it not deprecated? @DavidPasztor use case shows they can be equivalent, but when would ObservedObject be the first choice? – Ryan Heitner Jun 25 at 7:06
  • @RyanHeitner Everything is in the useful links I provided. But since it's true that not everyone will read them all, I added the summary to my answer. – pawello2222 Jun 25 at 7:45
6
3

Apple documentation did explain why initializing with ObservedObject is unsafe.

SwiftUI might create or recreate a view at any time, so it’s important that initializing a view with a given set of inputs always results in the same view. As a result, it’s unsafe to create an observed object inside a view.

The solution is StateObject.

At the same time, the documentation showed us how we should create data models in a view (or app/scene) when it can hold on to the truth, and pass it to another view.

struct LibraryView: View {
    @StateObject var book = Book() // Hold on to the 1 truth
    var body: some View {
        BookView(book: book) // Pass it to another view
    }
}

struct BookView: View {
    @ObservedObject var book: Book // From external source
}
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5
2

Even though pawello2222's answer have nicely explained the differences when the view itself creates its view model, it's important to note the differences when the view model is injected into the view.

When you inject the view model into the view, as long as the view model is a reference type, there are no differences between @ObservedObject and @StateObject, since the object that injected the view model into your view should hold a reference to view model as well, hence the view model isn't destroyed when the child view is redrawn.

class ViewModel: ObservableObject {}

struct ParentView: View {
    @ObservedObject var viewModel = ViewModel()

    var body: some View {
        ChildView(viewModel: viewModel) // You inject the view model into the child view
    }
}

// Even if `ChildView` is discarded/redrawn, `ViewModel` is kept in memory, since `ParentView` still holds a reference to it - `ViewModel` is only released and hence destroyed when `ParentView` is destroyed/redrawn.
struct ChildView: View {
    @ObservedObject var viewModel: ViewModel
}
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