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I have a service that I wrote that I need to deploy to a number (about 1100) devices. All of these devices are logged in as a regular user, not an administrator.

I can push out the service with our deployment software, which does run as an admin. Our security team does not want this service to run on the Local System account (for obvious reasons). What I've come up with is that the service will install as the Local System, but will then change it's log in account to a virtual user, which then needs access to a folder in Program Files (x86).

What I've found is that if I install the service (using remote admin access) via the command line, I can install the service, but it won't start.

When I look in the event logs, I get an UnauthorizedAccessException error.

This I suspect is because the service is already running under the virtual user which doesn't have access to start the service. So how can I get around this?

In the main class for the service, I have this method, which is supposed to give the user access to the necessary folder:

    private void GiveDirectoryAccess(string dir, string user)
    {
        try
        {
            DirectoryInfo directoryInfo = new DirectoryInfo(dir);
            DirectorySecurity ds = directoryInfo.GetAccessControl();
            ds.AddAccessRule(new FileSystemAccessRule(user, FileSystemRights.FullControl,
                InheritanceFlags.ObjectInherit | InheritanceFlags.ContainerInherit, PropagationFlags.NoPropagateInherit, AccessControlType.Allow));
            directoryInfo.SetAccessControl(ds);
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            SimpleLog.Log(e);
            throw;
        }

    }

This is called right after the service is initialized:

    public CheckRALVersionService()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        // Give directory access
        string alhadminPath = System.IO.Path.Combine(pathToFolder, alhadmin);
        GiveDirectoryAccess(alhadminPath, serviceUser);
        string exeName = System.IO.Path.GetFileName(fullExeNameAndPath);
        string tmppath = System.IO.Path.Combine(localdir, tmp);
        SimpleLog.SetLogFile(logDir: tmppath, prefix: "debout." + exeName + "_", extension: "log");
        watcher = new DirectoryWatcher(pathToFolder, alhadmin);
    }

Then, in the ProjectInstaller class, I am changing the user to the virtual user in the serviceInstaller1_Committed method:

    void serviceInstaller1_Committed(object sender, InstallEventArgs e)
    {
        using (ManagementObject service = new ManagementObject(new ManagementPath("Win32_Service.Name='RalConfigUpdate'")))
        {
            object[] wmiParams = new object[11];
            wmiParams[6] = @"NT Service\RalConfigUpdate";
            service.InvokeMethod("Change", wmiParams);
        }
    }

Do I need a helper service to give the access? Can what I want to do be done all within this service?

Thanks in advance.

  • I'm pretty sure that you can't gain acces to the other user without admin rights. Have you seen this: How to: Impersonate a Client on a Service? – Maciej Los Jul 2 '20 at 6:15
  • @Harlan I'm a bit confused. The Q talk about permission on files system, but then you talk about problems on running a service. NOTE: Is Windows that normally starts the Services, depend of setting of the Service. I've one important question: Who is the user that the service use to run itself? (see in Properties of service, Connection). The code have the same rights of the user than impersonate, then if the virtual user don't have the right to change permissions on file system, the code will cannot. In 2011 I've wrote some winServices that self-install, if U need I can share the core. – Davide Dolla Jul 6 '20 at 14:49
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One option could be to grant the regular user, the permission to start & stop the service. There is a little tool from Microsoft for that purpose: SubInAcl!

Set Windows Service Permission!

There should be the possibility to do so using group policies as well. That should be a better approach for your use case. On the other hand, the SubInAcl method is easier to test for you. I found an older description here!

0

To strictly respond to your question:

You can use System.Io.File.GetAccessControl to get a FileSecurity Class tha can be used to modify the Permissions on filesystem. The links show some good examples.

BUT that will works ONLY if the user that will run the process will have the right to CHANGE the PERMISSIONS from Windows, if not ====> UnauthorizedAccessException

0

After sitting on this for a bit, I found a solution. It may not be the most elegant, but it should work for my purposes. I had all of the "parts", but was just doing things in the wrong order.

Previously, I was trying to change the user during the install process, which wasn't working. What I ended up doing was allow the service to install as the LOCAL SYSTEM account, and then change to the virtual account user during the OnStart method of the actual program.

So:

    protected override void OnStart(string[] args)
    {
        string alhadminPath = System.IO.Path.Combine(pathToFolder, alohadmin);

        try
        {
            // Update the service state to start pending
            ServiceStatus serviceStatus = new ServiceStatus
            {
                dwCurrentState = ServiceState.SERVICE_START_PENDING,
                dwWaitHint = 100000
            };
            SetServiceStatus(this.ServiceHandle, ref serviceStatus);

            // Update the logs
            eventLog1.WriteEntry("Starting Service", EventLogEntryType.Information, eventId++);
            SimpleLog.Info("RAL Config Update Service started");

            serviceStatus.dwCurrentState = ServiceState.SERVICE_RUNNING;
            SetServiceStatus(this.ServiceHandle, ref serviceStatus);

            // Change the user to the virutal user
            using (ManagementObject service = new ManagementObject(new ManagementPath("Win32_Service.Name='RalConfigUpdate'")))
            {
                object[] wmiParams = new object[11];
                wmiParams[6] = serviceUser;
                service.InvokeMethod("Change", wmiParams);
            }
            GiveDirectoryAccess(alhadminPath, serviceUser);
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            eventLog1.WriteEntry("Service failed to start", EventLogEntryType.Error, eventId++);
            SimpleLog.Log(e);
            throw;
        }
    }

This is working the way it should, and should also satisfy the security procedures. Thanks everyone.

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