5

I would like to produce a graphic combining four facets of a graph with insets in each facet showing a detail of the respective plot. This is one of the things I tried:

    #create data frame

n_replicates <- c(rep(1:10,15),rep(seq(10,100,10),15),rep(seq(100,1000,100),15),rep(seq(1000,10000,1000),15))
sim_years <- rep(sort(rep((1:15),10)),4)
sd_data <- rep (NA,600)
for (i in 1:600) {
sd_data[i]<-rnorm(1,mean=exp(0.1 * sim_years[i]), sd= 1/n_replicates[i])
}
max_rep <- sort(rep(c(10,100,1000,10000),150))
data_frame <- cbind.data.frame(n_replicates,sim_years,sd_data,max_rep)


#do first basic plot
library(ggplot2)
plot1<-ggplot(data=data_frame, aes(x=sim_years,y=sd_data,group =n_replicates, col=n_replicates)) + 
  geom_line() + theme_bw() +
  labs(title ="",  x = "year", y = "sd")
plot1


#make four facets
my_breaks = c(2, 10, 100, 1000, 10000)
facet_names <- c(
  `10` = "2, 3, ..., 10 replicates",
  `100` = "10, 20, ..., 100 replicates",
  `1000` = "100, 200, ..., 1000 replicates",
  `10000` = "1000, 2000, ..., 10000 replicates"
)
plot2 <- plot1 + 
  facet_wrap( ~ max_rep, ncol=2, labeller = as_labeller(facet_names)) + 
  scale_colour_gradientn(name = "number of replicates", trans = "log",
                         breaks = my_breaks, labels = my_breaks, colours = rainbow(20))
plot2


#extract inlays (this is where it goes wrong I think)
library(ggpmisc)
library(tibble)
library(dplyr)
inset <- tibble(x = 0.01, y = 10.01,
                    plot = list(plot2 +
                                  facet_wrap( ~ max_rep, ncol=2, labeller = as_labeller(facet_names)) +
                                  coord_cartesian(xlim = c(13, 15),
                                                  ylim = c(3, 5)) +
                                  labs(x = NULL, y = NULL, color = NULL) +
                                  scale_colour_gradient(guide = FALSE) + 
                                  theme_bw(10)))

plot3 <- plot2 +
  expand_limits(x = 0, y = 0) +
  geom_plot_npc(data = inset, aes(npcx = x, npcy = y, label = plot)) + 
  annotate(geom = "rect", 
           xmin = 13, xmax = 15, ymin = 3, ymax = 5,
           linetype = "dotted", fill = NA, colour = "black") 

plot3

That leads to the following graphic: plot3

As you can see, the colours in the insets are wrong, and all four of them appear in each of the facets even though I only want the corresponding inset of course. I read through a lot of questions here (to even get me this far) and also some examples in the ggpmisc user guide but unfortunately I am still a bit lost on how to achieve what I want. Except maybe to do it by hand extracting four insets and then combining them with plot2. But I hope there will be a better way to do this. Thank you for your help!

Edit: better graphic now thanks to this answer, but problem remains partially unsolved:

The following code does good insets, but unfortunately the colours are not preserved. As in the above version each inset does its own rainbow colours anew instead of inheriting the partial rainbow scale from the facet it belongs to. Does anyone know why and how I could change this? In comments I put another (bad) attempt at solving this, it preserves the colors but has the problem of putting all four insets in each facet.

library(ggpmisc)
library(tibble)
library(dplyr)

# #extract inlays: good colours, but produces four insets.
# fourinsets <- tibble(#x = 0.01, y = 10.01,
#                      x = c(rep(0.01, 4)), 
#                      y = c(rep(10.01, 4)), 
#                     plot = list(plot2 +
#                                   facet_wrap( ~ max_rep, ncol=2) +
#                                   coord_cartesian(xlim = c(13, 15),
#                                                   ylim = c(3, 5)) +
#                                   labs(x = NULL, y = NULL, color = NULL) +
#                                   scale_colour_gradientn(name = "number of replicates", trans = "log", guide = FALSE,
#                                                          colours = rainbow(20)) +
#                                   theme(
#                                     strip.background = element_blank(),
#                                     strip.text.x = element_blank()
#                                   )
#                                 ))
# fourinsets$plot

library(purrr)
pp <- map(unique(data_frame$max_rep), function(x) {
  
  plot2$data <- plot2$data %>% filter(max_rep == x)
  plot2 + 
    coord_cartesian(xlim = c(12, 14),
                    ylim = c(3, 4)) +
    labs(x = NULL, y = NULL) +
    theme(
      strip.background = element_blank(),
      strip.text.x = element_blank(),
      legend.position = "none",
      axis.text=element_blank(),
      axis.ticks=element_blank()
    )
})
#pp[[2]]

inset_new <- tibble(x = c(rep(0.01, 4)), 
                    y = c(rep(10.01, 4)), 
                plot = pp, 
                max_rep = unique(data_frame$max_rep))

final_plot <- plot2 + 
  geom_plot_npc(data = inset_new, aes(npcx = x, npcy = y, label = plot, vp.width = 0.3, vp.height =0.6)) +
  annotate(geom = "rect", 
           xmin = 12, xmax = 14, ymin = 3, ymax = 4,
           linetype = "dotted", fill = NA, colour = "black") 


#final_plot

final_plot then looks like this:

final_plot: good inlays with wrong colours

I hope this clarifies the problem a bit. Any ideas are very welcome :)

  • great question but please consider not using the rainbow colormap because it's not good for colorblind people nature.com/articles/519291d & blogs.egu.eu/divisions/gd/2017/08/23/the-rainbow-colour-map. – Tung Jul 22 at 7:21
  • I did, but I feel I really do need a lot of colours to get the message across. Not sure how that could work. Most of the options mentioned in your links either have only two colours and way too little contrast, or they fade to a very light colour that would not be visible enough on a white background. If you have a good idea that might work, though, I would be very grateful. Especially since I am not happy either with the green colours that look too similar to me in the upper right facet. – Apatura Jul 29 at 15:36
8

Modifying off @user63230's excellent answer:

pp <- map(unique(data_frame$max_rep), function(x) {  
  plot2 + 
    aes(alpha = ifelse(max_rep == x, 1, 0)) +
    coord_cartesian(xlim = c(12, 14),
                    ylim = c(3, 4)) +
    labs(x = NULL, y = NULL) +
    scale_alpha_identity() +
    facet_null() +
    theme(
      strip.background = element_blank(),
      strip.text.x = element_blank(),
      legend.position = "none",
      axis.text=element_blank(),
      axis.ticks=element_blank()
    )
})

Explanation:

  1. Instead of filtering the data passed into plot2 (which affects the mapping of colours), we impose a new aesthetic alpha, where lines belonging to the other replicate numbers are assigned 0 for transparency;
  2. Use scale_alpha_identity() to tell ggplot that the alpha mapping is to be used as-is: i.e. 1 for 100%, 0 for 0%.
  3. Add facet_null() to override plot2's existing facet_wrap, which removes the facet for the inset.

plot

Everything else is unchanged from the code in the question.

| improve this answer | |
  • very clever, I was just about to embark on trying to manually extract colours from the first plot to match them in the inset...this is so much simpler – user63230 Jul 1 at 9:51
  • Thank god for this, I've been trying for a week now and was also this close to trying to manually define some colours for the lines or something stupid like that. Can I split the bounty between you? – Apatura Jul 1 at 9:55
  • Did you notice that in the first two inlays there is something weird going on with the light green lines? They are broken / there are vertical lines that don't seem to exist in the big facet. I got something similar when I tried it with different coordinates for the inlay. – Apatura Jul 1 at 15:32
  • I also implemented this with other data and while I can't be 100% sure it always looks to me like in the inlay the last respective line vanishes, i.e. in the first inlay the one with 10 replicates, and in the second inlay the one with 100 replicates. Even though the data is definitely there and the line is visible in the main facets if it is zoomed in or on a large screen. The solution makes so much sense that it should definitely work, but something else is very wrong. Maybe there is a clash with aes somewhere? – Apatura Jul 29 at 15:47
6

I think this will get you started although its tricky to get the size of the inset plot right (when you include a legend).

#set up data
library(ggpmisc)
library(tibble)
library(dplyr)
library(ggplot2)

# create data frame
n_replicates <- c(rep(1:10, 15), rep(seq(10, 100, 10), 15), rep(seq(100, 
  1000, 100), 15), rep(seq(1000, 10000, 1000), 15))
sim_years <- rep(sort(rep((1:15), 10)), 4)
sd_data <- rep(NA, 600)
for (i in 1:600) {
  sd_data[i] <- rnorm(1, mean = exp(0.1 * sim_years[i]), sd = 1/n_replicates[i])
}
max_rep <- sort(rep(c(10, 100, 1000, 10000), 150))
data_frame <- cbind.data.frame(n_replicates, sim_years, sd_data, max_rep)

# make four facets
my_breaks = c(2, 10, 100, 1000, 10000)
facet_names <- c(`10` = "2, 3, ..., 10 replicates", `100` = "10, 20, ..., 100 replicates", 
  `1000` = "100, 200, ..., 1000 replicates", `10000` = "1000, 2000, ..., 10000 replicates")

Get overall plot:

# overall facet plot
overall_plot <- ggplot(data = data_frame, aes(x = sim_years, y = sd_data, group = n_replicates, col = n_replicates)) + 
  geom_line() + 
  theme_bw() + 
  labs(title = "", x = "year", y = "sd") + 
  facet_wrap(~max_rep, ncol = 2, labeller = as_labeller(facet_names)) + 
  scale_colour_gradientn(name = "number of replicates", trans = "log", breaks = my_breaks, labels = my_breaks, colours = rainbow(20))

#plot
overall_plot

which gives:

enter image description here

Then from the overall plot you want to extract each plot, see here. We can map over the list to extract one at a time:

pp <- map(unique(data_frame$max_rep), function(x) {
  
  overall_plot$data <- overall_plot$data %>% filter(max_rep == x)
  overall_plot + # coord_cartesian(xlim = c(13, 15), ylim = c(3, 5)) +
  labs(x = NULL, y = NULL) + 
  theme_bw(10) + 
  theme(legend.position = "none")
  
})

If we look at one of these (I've removed the legend) e.g.

pp[[1]]
#pp[[2]]
#pp[[3]]
#pp[[4]]

Gives:

enter image description here

Then we want to add these inset plots into a dataframe so that each plot has its own row:

inset <- tibble(x = c(rep(0.01, 4)), 
                y = c(rep(10.01, 4)), 
                plot = pp, 
                max_rep = unique(data_frame$max_rep))

Then merge this into the overall plot:

overall_plot + 
  expand_limits(x = 0, y = 0) + 
  geom_plot_npc(data = inset, aes(npcx = x, npcy = y, label = plot, vp.width = 0.8, vp.height = 0.8))

Gives:

enter image description here

| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you so much! My graphic is much improved now as you can see above, but unfortunately I still have a huge problem with the colours. The insets are supposed to look like magnified versions of the respective facet.. but I can't get it right :( – Apatura Jun 30 at 18:06

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