156

The code looks like this:

StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
XmlWriterSettings settings = new XmlWriterSettings();
settings.OmitXmlDeclaration = true;
using (XmlWriter xmlWriter = XmlWriter.Create(builder, settings))
{
    XmlSerializer s = new XmlSerializer(objectToSerialize.GetType());
    s.Serialize(xmlWriter, objectToSerialize);
}

The resulting serialized document includes namespaces, like so:

<message xmlns:xsi=\"http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance\" 
    xmlns:xsd=\"http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema\" 
    xmlns="urn:something">
 ...
</message>

To remove the xsi and xsd namespaces, I can follow the answer from How to serialize an object to XML without getting xmlns=”…”?.

I want my message tag as <message> (without any namespace attributes). How can I do this?

5
  • 2
    I know you think this might make your xml look better, but providing namespaces and corresponding xsd's is better practice.
    – user1228
    Mar 9, 2009 at 12:11
  • 2
    I want my xml only as <message>, I am talking about omitting xmlns:xsi and xmlns:xsd namespaces.
    – NetSide
    Mar 9, 2009 at 12:30
  • 5
    For the record: In general, this is a foolish mistake. The namespaces are there for a reason, and removing them all will break things. Things like deserialization. Jul 25, 2009 at 23:57
  • 75
    Note that sometimes it's not foolish and not a mistake. For example, one may need to generate fragments of document and put them together later. Personally, I needed to generate a lot of similar and very large documents. All of them had the same large parts deep inside the tree. So I had to generate the invariant parts beforehand and insert them as byte arrays when generating the documents. So to make the output more readable and smaller I needed to omit some namespace declarations in inner parts because they existed on the higher levels. Dec 13, 2010 at 16:05
  • @JohnSaunders i'm fine with .NET adding namespaces for compatibility. the problem is that .NET does not consistently add namespaces to every element created. so, you end up having to mess with them, despite being fine with it
    – symbiont
    Nov 20, 2020 at 15:04

5 Answers 5

264
...
XmlSerializer s = new XmlSerializer(objectToSerialize.GetType());
XmlSerializerNamespaces ns = new XmlSerializerNamespaces();
ns.Add("","");
s.Serialize(xmlWriter, objectToSerialize, ns);
8
  • 2
    I would just like to add that removing the default namespace can have unintended consequences : for instance, if you use the XmlInclude attribute to serialize derived types, the namespaces will be added to each of these elements, whether you want it or not, because they're necessary for deserialization Aug 25, 2009 at 8:27
  • 4
    Also, this doesn't remove all xml namespaces, as the question asked. It removes only the xsi and xsd namespaces, as mentioned in the question stackoverflow.com/questions/258960, which is also cited in this question.
    – Cheeso
    Oct 30, 2009 at 20:36
  • 1
    Also not supported by MS as mentioned in my own answer. It doesn't always work, especially when your type may be used with others that do have namespaces. Jul 18, 2013 at 12:48
  • 4
    Thanks to Thomas Levesque for this answer. Since I too do not live in an ivory tower where everything conforms to Best Practices, this solved my issue beautifully. Mar 21, 2016 at 12:03
  • 15
    Can be shortened to s.Serialize(writer, objectToSerialize, new XmlSerializerNamespaces(new[] { XmlQualifiedName.Empty }));
    – Xeevis
    Jun 14, 2018 at 10:53
31

This is the 2nd of two answers.

If you want to just strip all namespaces arbitrarily from a document during serialization, you can do this by implementing your own XmlWriter.

The easiest way is to derive from XmlTextWriter and override the StartElement method that emits namespaces. The StartElement method is invoked by the XmlSerializer when emitting any elements, including the root. By overriding the namespace for each element, and replacing it with the empty string, you've stripped the namespaces from the output.

public class NoNamespaceXmlWriter : XmlTextWriter
{
    //Provide as many contructors as you need
    public NoNamespaceXmlWriter(System.IO.TextWriter output)
        : base(output) { Formatting= System.Xml.Formatting.Indented;}

    public override void WriteStartDocument () { }

    public override void WriteStartElement(string prefix, string localName, string ns)
    {
        base.WriteStartElement("", localName, "");
    }
}

Suppose this is the type:

// explicitly specify a namespace for this type,
// to be used during XML serialization.
[XmlRoot(Namespace="urn:Abracadabra")]
public class MyTypeWithNamespaces
{
    // private fields backing the properties
    private int _Epoch;
    private string _Label;

    // explicitly define a distinct namespace for this element
    [XmlElement(Namespace="urn:Whoohoo")]
    public string Label
    {
        set {  _Label= value; } 
        get { return _Label; } 
    }

    // this property will be implicitly serialized to XML using the
    // member name for the element name, and inheriting the namespace from
    // the type.
    public int Epoch
    {
        set {  _Epoch= value; } 
        get { return _Epoch; } 
    }
}

Here's how you would use such a thing during serialization:

        var o2= new MyTypeWithNamespaces { ..intializers.. };
        var builder = new System.Text.StringBuilder();
        using ( XmlWriter writer = new NoNamespaceXmlWriter(new System.IO.StringWriter(builder)))
        {
            s2.Serialize(writer, o2, ns2);
        }            
        Console.WriteLine("{0}",builder.ToString());

The XmlTextWriter is sort of broken, though. According to the reference doc, when it writes it does not check for the following:

  • Invalid characters in attribute and element names.

  • Unicode characters that do not fit the specified encoding. If the Unicode characters do not fit the specified encoding, the XmlTextWriter does not escape the Unicode characters into character entities.

  • Duplicate attributes.

  • Characters in the DOCTYPE public identifier or system identifier.

These problems with XmlTextWriter have been around since v1.1 of the .NET Framework, and they will remain, for backward compatibility. If you have no concerns about those problems, then by all means use the XmlTextWriter. But most people would like a bit more reliability.

To get that, while still suppressing namespaces during serialization, instead of deriving from XmlTextWriter, define a concrete implementation of the abstract XmlWriter and its 24 methods.

An example is here:

public class XmlWriterWrapper : XmlWriter
{
    protected XmlWriter writer;

    public XmlWriterWrapper(XmlWriter baseWriter)
    {
        this.Writer = baseWriter;
    }

    public override void Close()
    {
        this.writer.Close();
    }

    protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        ((IDisposable) this.writer).Dispose();
    }

    public override void Flush()
    {
        this.writer.Flush();
    }

    public override string LookupPrefix(string ns)
    {
        return this.writer.LookupPrefix(ns);
    }

    public override void WriteBase64(byte[] buffer, int index, int count)
    {
        this.writer.WriteBase64(buffer, index, count);
    }

    public override void WriteCData(string text)
    {
        this.writer.WriteCData(text);
    }

    public override void WriteCharEntity(char ch)
    {
        this.writer.WriteCharEntity(ch);
    }

    public override void WriteChars(char[] buffer, int index, int count)
    {
        this.writer.WriteChars(buffer, index, count);
    }

    public override void WriteComment(string text)
    {
        this.writer.WriteComment(text);
    }

    public override void WriteDocType(string name, string pubid, string sysid, string subset)
    {
        this.writer.WriteDocType(name, pubid, sysid, subset);
    }

    public override void WriteEndAttribute()
    {
        this.writer.WriteEndAttribute();
    }

    public override void WriteEndDocument()
    {
        this.writer.WriteEndDocument();
    }

    public override void WriteEndElement()
    {
        this.writer.WriteEndElement();
    }

    public override void WriteEntityRef(string name)
    {
        this.writer.WriteEntityRef(name);
    }

    public override void WriteFullEndElement()
    {
        this.writer.WriteFullEndElement();
    }

    public override void WriteProcessingInstruction(string name, string text)
    {
        this.writer.WriteProcessingInstruction(name, text);
    }

    public override void WriteRaw(string data)
    {
        this.writer.WriteRaw(data);
    }

    public override void WriteRaw(char[] buffer, int index, int count)
    {
        this.writer.WriteRaw(buffer, index, count);
    }

    public override void WriteStartAttribute(string prefix, string localName, string ns)
    {
        this.writer.WriteStartAttribute(prefix, localName, ns);
    }

    public override void WriteStartDocument()
    {
        this.writer.WriteStartDocument();
    }

    public override void WriteStartDocument(bool standalone)
    {
        this.writer.WriteStartDocument(standalone);
    }

    public override void WriteStartElement(string prefix, string localName, string ns)
    {
        this.writer.WriteStartElement(prefix, localName, ns);
    }

    public override void WriteString(string text)
    {
        this.writer.WriteString(text);
    }

    public override void WriteSurrogateCharEntity(char lowChar, char highChar)
    {
        this.writer.WriteSurrogateCharEntity(lowChar, highChar);
    }

    public override void WriteValue(bool value)
    {
        this.writer.WriteValue(value);
    }

    public override void WriteValue(DateTime value)
    {
        this.writer.WriteValue(value);
    }

    public override void WriteValue(decimal value)
    {
        this.writer.WriteValue(value);
    }

    public override void WriteValue(double value)
    {
        this.writer.WriteValue(value);
    }

    public override void WriteValue(int value)
    {
        this.writer.WriteValue(value);
    }

    public override void WriteValue(long value)
    {
        this.writer.WriteValue(value);
    }

    public override void WriteValue(object value)
    {
        this.writer.WriteValue(value);
    }

    public override void WriteValue(float value)
    {
        this.writer.WriteValue(value);
    }

    public override void WriteValue(string value)
    {
        this.writer.WriteValue(value);
    }

    public override void WriteWhitespace(string ws)
    {
        this.writer.WriteWhitespace(ws);
    }


    public override XmlWriterSettings Settings
    {
        get
        {
            return this.writer.Settings;
        }
    }

    protected XmlWriter Writer
    {
        get
        {
            return this.writer;
        }
        set
        {
            this.writer = value;
        }
    }

    public override System.Xml.WriteState WriteState
    {
        get
        {
            return this.writer.WriteState;
        }
    }

    public override string XmlLang
    {
        get
        {
            return this.writer.XmlLang;
        }
    }

    public override System.Xml.XmlSpace XmlSpace
    {
        get
        {
            return this.writer.XmlSpace;
        }
    }        
}

Then, provide a derived class that overrides the StartElement method, as before:

public class NamespaceSupressingXmlWriter : XmlWriterWrapper
{
    //Provide as many contructors as you need
    public NamespaceSupressingXmlWriter(System.IO.TextWriter output)
        : base(XmlWriter.Create(output)) { }

    public NamespaceSupressingXmlWriter(XmlWriter output)
        : base(XmlWriter.Create(output)) { }

    public override void WriteStartElement(string prefix, string localName, string ns)
    {
        base.WriteStartElement("", localName, "");
    }
}

And then use this writer like so:

        var o2= new MyTypeWithNamespaces { ..intializers.. };
        var builder = new System.Text.StringBuilder();
        var settings = new XmlWriterSettings { OmitXmlDeclaration = true, Indent= true };
        using ( XmlWriter innerWriter = XmlWriter.Create(builder, settings))
            using ( XmlWriter writer = new NamespaceSupressingXmlWriter(innerWriter))
            {
                s2.Serialize(writer, o2, ns2);
            }            
        Console.WriteLine("{0}",builder.ToString());

Credit for this to Oleg Tkachenko.

5
  • 3
    I found that I also needed to override LookupPrefix(string ns) to always return an empty string to remove all schema declarations. Feb 2, 2012 at 14:27
  • This does not technically answer the question - you are using XmlTextWriter, not XmlWriter. I notice because I want to use XmlWriter, for the XmlWriterSettings that I can use with it.
    – Abacus
    Apr 15, 2013 at 16:13
  • @Abacus did you read the code? It uses XmlWriter and XmlWriterSettings.
    – Cheeso
    Apr 20, 2013 at 4:35
  • my bad, I must have missed that.
    – Abacus
    Apr 22, 2013 at 13:33
  • 1
    Great Answer, In addition to the added method from @KevinBrock , i also needed to overload the <!-- language: lang-cs --> WriteStartAttribute(string prefix, string localName, string ns) before my code would strip out all the namespacing. Also worth noting my namespace prefixes were changing from b2p1 to p2, which led me to check for other methods using prefixes.
    – Mabdullah
    Feb 21, 2014 at 13:47
17

After reading Microsoft's documentation and several solutions online, I have discovered the solution to this problem. It works with both the built-in XmlSerializer and custom XML serialization via IXmlSerialiazble.

To wit, I'll use the same MyTypeWithNamespaces XML sample that's been used in the answers to this question so far.

[XmlRoot("MyTypeWithNamespaces", Namespace="urn:Abracadabra", IsNullable=false)]
public class MyTypeWithNamespaces
{
    // As noted below, per Microsoft's documentation, if the class exposes a public
    // member of type XmlSerializerNamespaces decorated with the 
    // XmlNamespacesDeclarationAttribute, then the XmlSerializer will utilize those
    // namespaces during serialization.
    public MyTypeWithNamespaces( )
    {
        this._namespaces = new XmlSerializerNamespaces(new XmlQualifiedName[] {
            // Don't do this!! Microsoft's documentation explicitly says it's not supported.
            // It doesn't throw any exceptions, but in my testing, it didn't always work.

            // new XmlQualifiedName(string.Empty, string.Empty),  // And don't do this:
            // new XmlQualifiedName("", "")

            // DO THIS:
            new XmlQualifiedName(string.Empty, "urn:Abracadabra") // Default Namespace
            // Add any other namespaces, with prefixes, here.
        });
    }

    // If you have other constructors, make sure to call the default constructor.
    public MyTypeWithNamespaces(string label, int epoch) : this( )
    {
        this._label = label;
        this._epoch = epoch;
    }

    // An element with a declared namespace different than the namespace
    // of the enclosing type.
    [XmlElement(Namespace="urn:Whoohoo")]
    public string Label
    {
        get { return this._label; }
        set { this._label = value; }
    }
    private string _label;

    // An element whose tag will be the same name as the property name.
    // Also, this element will inherit the namespace of the enclosing type.
    public int Epoch
    {
        get { return this._epoch; }
        set { this._epoch = value; }
    }
    private int _epoch;

    // Per Microsoft's documentation, you can add some public member that
    // returns a XmlSerializerNamespaces object. They use a public field,
    // but that's sloppy. So I'll use a private backed-field with a public
    // getter property. Also, per the documentation, for this to work with
    // the XmlSerializer, decorate it with the XmlNamespaceDeclarations
    // attribute.
    [XmlNamespaceDeclarations]
    public XmlSerializerNamespaces Namespaces
    {
        get { return this._namespaces; }
    }
    private XmlSerializerNamespaces _namespaces;
}

That's all to this class. Now, some objected to having an XmlSerializerNamespaces object somewhere within their classes; but as you can see, I neatly tucked it away in the default constructor and exposed a public property to return the namespaces.

Now, when it comes time to serialize the class, you would use the following code:

MyTypeWithNamespaces myType = new MyTypeWithNamespaces("myLabel", 42);

/******
   OK, I just figured I could do this to make the code shorter, so I commented out the
   below and replaced it with what follows:

// You have to use this constructor in order for the root element to have the right namespaces.
// If you need to do custom serialization of inner objects, you can use a shortened constructor.
XmlSerializer xs = new XmlSerializer(typeof(MyTypeWithNamespaces), new XmlAttributeOverrides(),
    new Type[]{}, new XmlRootAttribute("MyTypeWithNamespaces"), "urn:Abracadabra");

******/
XmlSerializer xs = new XmlSerializer(typeof(MyTypeWithNamespaces),
    new XmlRootAttribute("MyTypeWithNamespaces") { Namespace="urn:Abracadabra" });

// I'll use a MemoryStream as my backing store.
MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream();

// This is extra! If you want to change the settings for the XmlSerializer, you have to create
// a separate XmlWriterSettings object and use the XmlTextWriter.Create(...) factory method.
// So, in this case, I want to omit the XML declaration.
XmlWriterSettings xws = new XmlWriterSettings();
xws.OmitXmlDeclaration = true;
xws.Encoding = Encoding.UTF8; // This is probably the default
// You could use the XmlWriterSetting to set indenting and new line options, but the
// XmlTextWriter class has a much easier method to accomplish that.

// The factory method returns a XmlWriter, not a XmlTextWriter, so cast it.
XmlTextWriter xtw = (XmlTextWriter)XmlTextWriter.Create(ms, xws);
// Then we can set our indenting options (this is, of course, optional).
xtw.Formatting = Formatting.Indented;

// Now serialize our object.
xs.Serialize(xtw, myType, myType.Namespaces);

Once you have done this, you should get the following output:

<MyTypeWithNamespaces>
    <Label xmlns="urn:Whoohoo">myLabel</Label>
    <Epoch>42</Epoch>
</MyTypeWithNamespaces>

I have successfully used this method in a recent project with a deep hierachy of classes that are serialized to XML for web service calls. Microsoft's documentation is not very clear about what to do with the publicly accesible XmlSerializerNamespaces member once you've created it, and so many think it's useless. But by following their documentation and using it in the manner shown above, you can customize how the XmlSerializer generates XML for your classes without resorting to unsupported behavior or "rolling your own" serialization by implementing IXmlSerializable.

It is my hope that this answer will put to rest, once and for all, how to get rid of the standard xsi and xsd namespaces generated by the XmlSerializer.

UPDATE: I just want to make sure I answered the OP's question about removing all namespaces. My code above will work for this; let me show you how. Now, in the example above, you really can't get rid of all namespaces (because there are two namespaces in use). Somewhere in your XML document, you're going to need to have something like xmlns="urn:Abracadabra" xmlns:w="urn:Whoohoo. If the class in the example is part of a larger document, then somewhere above a namespace must be declared for either one of (or both) Abracadbra and Whoohoo. If not, then the element in one or both of the namespaces must be decorated with a prefix of some sort (you can't have two default namespaces, right?). So, for this example, Abracadabra is the defalt namespace. I could inside my MyTypeWithNamespaces class add a namespace prefix for the Whoohoo namespace like so:

public MyTypeWithNamespaces
{
    this._namespaces = new XmlSerializerNamespaces(new XmlQualifiedName[] {
        new XmlQualifiedName(string.Empty, "urn:Abracadabra"), // Default Namespace
        new XmlQualifiedName("w", "urn:Whoohoo")
    });
}

Now, in my class definition, I indicated that the <Label/> element is in the namespace "urn:Whoohoo", so I don't need to do anything further. When I now serialize the class using my above serialization code unchanged, this is the output:

<MyTypeWithNamespaces xmlns:w="urn:Whoohoo">
    <w:Label>myLabel</w:Label>
    <Epoch>42</Epoch>
</MyTypeWithNamespaces>

Because <Label> is in a different namespace from the rest of the document, it must, in someway, be "decorated" with a namespace. Notice that there are still no xsi and xsd namespaces.

6
  • "Microsoft's documentation explicitly says it's not supported." Care to share where? Jun 22, 2012 at 8:14
  • Dave, as you posted on my answer to a similar question, XmlSerializer: remove unnecessary xsi and xsd namespaces, the link is here: XmlSerializerNamespaces Class. Jun 23, 2012 at 17:22
  • 1
    You are still passing the namespaces to the Serialize method. I thought the idea of providing a Public member was that you wouldn't have to do that? I can't get it to work though without passing it to the Serialize method. And unfortunately, I don't have access to that method call. I can only set the XmlSerializer instance to use.
    – crush
    Jan 10, 2018 at 22:43
  • I found that it's actually the XmlWriter that is contained in the XmlMediaTypeFormatter that forces the xsi and xsd namespaces into my output regardless. This only affects those using WebApi's default XmlMediaTypeFormatter. I copied the source code for it, and modified it to pass my Namespaces property to the Serialize method as it required to prevent the XmlWriter from automatically adding the two defaults. See this answer
    – crush
    Jan 10, 2018 at 23:11
  • @crush, that answer you linked to is misleading--not wrong, but its assertions are not all correct. If you look at the first code snippet in my answer, you will see a comment that explicitly states how the XmlSerializer works when you expose a public member of type XmlSerializerNamespaces decorated with the XmlNamespacesDeclarationAttribute. This was taken directly from MSDN and essentially uses those declared namespaces in place of the default ones provided by the XmlSerializer. Jan 11, 2018 at 19:06
12
XmlSerializer sr = new XmlSerializer(objectToSerialize.GetType());
TextWriter xmlWriter = new StreamWriter(filename);
XmlSerializerNamespaces namespaces = new XmlSerializerNamespaces();
namespaces.Add(string.Empty, string.Empty);
sr.Serialize(xmlWriter, objectToSerialize, namespaces);
1
  • As I already documented in my answer, per the MS Docs (formerly MSDN), using string.Empty is not supported, as it does not always work in all cases. Jul 29, 2022 at 20:27
7

This is the first of my two answers to the question.

If you want fine control over the namespaces - for example if you want to omit some of them but not others, or if you want to replace one namespace with another, you can do this using XmlAttributeOverrides.

Suppose you have this type definition:

// explicitly specify a namespace for this type,
// to be used during XML serialization.
[XmlRoot(Namespace="urn:Abracadabra")]
public class MyTypeWithNamespaces
{
    // private fields backing the properties
    private int _Epoch;
    private string _Label;

    // explicitly define a distinct namespace for this element
    [XmlElement(Namespace="urn:Whoohoo")]
    public string Label
    {
        set {  _Label= value; } 
        get { return _Label; } 
    }

    // this property will be implicitly serialized to XML using the
    // member name for the element name, and inheriting the namespace from
    // the type.
    public int Epoch
    {
        set {  _Epoch= value; } 
        get { return _Epoch; } 
    }
}

And this serialization pseudo-code:

        var o2= new MyTypeWithNamespaces() { ..initializers...};
        ns.Add( "", "urn:Abracadabra" );
        XmlSerializer s2 = new XmlSerializer(typeof(MyTypeWithNamespaces));
        s2.Serialize(System.Console.Out, o2, ns);

You would get something like this XML:

<MyTypeWithNamespaces xmlns="urn:Abracadabra">
  <Label xmlns="urn:Whoohoo">Cimsswybclaeqjh</Label>
  <Epoch>97</Epoch>
</MyTypeWithNamespaces>

Notice that there is a default namespace on the root element, and there is also a distinct namespace on the "Label" element. These namespaces were dictated by the attributes decorating the type, in the code above.

The Xml Serialization framework in .NET includes the possibility to explicitly override the attributes that decorate the actual code. You do this with the XmlAttributesOverrides class and friends. Suppose I have the same type, and I serialize it this way:

        // instantiate the container for all attribute overrides
        XmlAttributeOverrides xOver = new XmlAttributeOverrides();

        // define a set of XML attributes to apply to the root element
        XmlAttributes xAttrs1 = new XmlAttributes();

        // define an XmlRoot element (as if [XmlRoot] had decorated the type)
        // The namespace in the attribute override is the empty string. 
        XmlRootAttribute xRoot = new XmlRootAttribute() { Namespace = ""};

        // add that XmlRoot element to the container of attributes
        xAttrs1.XmlRoot= xRoot;

        // add that bunch of attributes to the container holding all overrides
        xOver.Add(typeof(MyTypeWithNamespaces), xAttrs1);

        // create another set of XML Attributes
        XmlAttributes xAttrs2 = new XmlAttributes();

        // define an XmlElement attribute, for a type of "String", with no namespace
        var xElt = new XmlElementAttribute(typeof(String)) { Namespace = ""};

        // add that XmlElement attribute to the 2nd bunch of attributes
        xAttrs2.XmlElements.Add(xElt);

        // add that bunch of attributes to the container for the type, and
        // specifically apply that bunch to the "Label" property on the type.
        xOver.Add(typeof(MyTypeWithNamespaces), "Label", xAttrs2);

        // instantiate a serializer with the overrides 
        XmlSerializer s3 = new XmlSerializer(typeof(MyTypeWithNamespaces), xOver);

        // serialize
        s3.Serialize(System.Console.Out, o2, ns2);

The result looks like this;

<MyTypeWithNamespaces>
  <Label>Cimsswybclaeqjh</Label>
  <Epoch>97</Epoch>
</MyTypeWithNamespaces>

You have stripped the namespaces.

A logical question is, can you strip all namespaces from arbitrary types during serialization, without going through the explicit overrides? The answer is YES, and how to do it is in my next response.

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