2

How can we do alphanumeric sorting in typescript to get the following series? ['1_11', '1_10', '1_9'...'1_1','1_0']

Should it be split and sorted separately?

2
  • Hello and welcome. What is the expected output ?
    – KBell
    Jun 26, 2020 at 11:58
  • @KBell Hi, the expected output is as shown above-must be sorted in descending order Jun 26, 2020 at 12:23

2 Answers 2

3

If you want full control over the sort order of the delimited values, you'll not be able to avoid splitting the values first. The solution below uses the compare2By() higher-order function to let you choose the sort key order and ascending/descending ordering per key.

(UPDATED to support key specific sort orders)

type Comparator<T> = (a: T, b: T) => number;

function compareAsc<T>(a: T, b: T) {
  return a < b ? -1 : a > b ? 1 : 0;
}

function compareDesc<T>(a: T, b: T) {
  return a < b ? 1 : a > b ? -1 : 0;
}

function compare2By<T extends any[]>(
    x = 0,
    y = 1,
    cmpX: Comparator<T[0]> = compareAsc,
    cmpY: Comparator<T[1]> = compareAsc
) {
  return (a: T, b: T) =>
    cmpX(a[x], b[x]) || cmpY(a[y], b[y]);
}

function sortDelimited(src: string[], sortFn: Comparator<number[]>, del = "_") {
  return src
    .map((x) => x.split(del))
    // optional int coercion, not sure if needed for OP
    .map((x) => x.map((y) => parseInt(y)))
    .sort(sortFn)
    .map((x) => x.join(del));
}

console.log(
    JSON.stringify(sortDelimited(
        ['1_11', '1_10', '1_9', '1_1', '1_0'],
        // UPDATED: use total descending order
        // for both first and second sort key
        compare2By(0, 1, compareDesc, compareDesc)
    ))
)

// ["1_11","1_10","1_9","1_1","1_0"]

Playground link

4
  • Small tip - compareDesc is trivially derivable from compareAsc by invoking it and negating the result - compareDesc = (a, b) => compareAsc(a, b) * -1. You can also make a higher order helper reverse = f => (a, b) => f(a, b) * -1 which makes comparesDesc = reverse(compareAsc) :P
    – VLAZ
    Jun 26, 2020 at 13:48
  • @VLAZ theoretically yes, but then again your reverse() would only have this one single use case (i.e. reversing compareAsc) so arguably much of an improvement (esp. if it incurs an additional fn call for each single comparison, just to flip the sign). seems a bit nitpicky... :)
    – toxi
    Jun 27, 2020 at 13:50
  • You can have other comparators, however. For example if you want case insensitive comparison, you should do caseInsensitiveAsc = new Intl.Collator().compare. in which case you can derive the reverse again, instead of writing another comparator. It means that if you change it to ignore diacretics, you automatically get the same functionality in the reverse. You can also do sorting by multiple fields, for example which will require another comparator for it. Or comparator for other items that don't obey < and >. Although I suppose you could also just use a flip to swap comaprison.
    – VLAZ
    Jun 27, 2020 at 16:28
  • @VLAD agree with all of that, but it's just somewhat out-of-scope of what was asked here, no? :) Anyway, same page, all good!
    – toxi
    Jun 28, 2020 at 11:54
1

this will sort the array:

this.array = this.array.sort((a, b) => {
  return +a.replace('_', '') > +b.replace('_', '') ? -1 : a === b ? 0 : 1
})
1
  • This is of course shorter, but much less optimal than the solution above, since these string replacements here will be done for each single comparison, i.e. multiple times per value rather than just once before and after the sort step...
    – toxi
    Jun 26, 2020 at 12:53

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