161

As the title says, I've got a string, and I want to split into segments n characters long.

For example:

var str = 'abcdefghijkl';

after some magic with n=3, will become

var arr = ['abc','def','ghi','jkl'];

Is there an elegant way to do this?

closed as primarily opinion-based by TylerH, Nick A, double-beep, Munim Munna, Paul Roub Apr 4 at 14:59

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

10 Answers 10

310

var str = 'abcdefghijkl';
console.log(str.match(/.{1,3}/g));

Note: Use {1,3} instead of just {3} to include the remainder for string lengths that aren't a multiple of 3, e.g:

console.log("abcd".match(/.{1,3}/g)); // ["abc", "d"]


A couple more subtleties:

  1. If your string may contain newlines (which you want to count as a character rather than splitting the string), then the . won't capture those. Use /[\s\S]{1,3}/ instead. (Thanks @Mike).
  2. If your string is empty, then match() will return null when you may be expecting an empty array. Protect against this by appending || [].

So you may end up with:

var str = 'abcdef \t\r\nghijkl';
var parts = str.match(/[\s\S]{1,3}/g) || [];
console.log(parts);

console.log(''.match(/[\s\S]{1,3}/g) || []);

  • This is technically the better answer as it will grab all the text from a string that's not evenly divisible by 3 (it will grab the last 2 or 1 characters). – Erik Jun 7 '11 at 0:36
  • 6
    Use [\s\S] instead of . so as not to fail on newlines. – Mike Samuel Jun 7 '11 at 0:42
  • 2
    You may want to start a new cycle on every line. If you really do have newlines, they probably indicate some type of transition. str.match(/.{1,3}/gm) may be a better choice. – kennebec Jun 7 '11 at 2:51
  • +1 Careful: ''.match(/.{1,3}/g) and ''.match(/.{3}/g) return null instead of an empty array. – Web_Designer Jun 18 '14 at 16:15
  • 3
    Is it possible to have a variable in the place of number 3? – Ana Claudia Aug 19 '14 at 10:16
35

If you didn't want to use a regular expression...

var chunks = [];

for (var i = 0, charsLength = str.length; i < charsLength; i += 3) {
    chunks.push(str.substring(i, i + 3));
}

jsFiddle.

...otherwise the regex solution is pretty good :)

  • 1
    +1 cos I'd prefer this if the 3 is variable as suggested by the OP. It's more readable than concatenating a regexp string. – David Tang Jun 7 '11 at 0:56
  • if only you could wrap that into a useful function ready to be used – momomo Sep 28 '16 at 9:49
  • 1
    This is more than 10x faster than the regex option, so I would go with this (inside of a function) jsbench.github.io/#9cb819bf1ce429575f8535a211f72d5a – Job Mar 27 '17 at 8:33
  • 1
    My previous statement applies to Chromium (also, I was too late with editing the previous comment hence the new one). On Firefox it's currently "only" 30% faster on my machine, but that's still consistently better. – Job Mar 27 '17 at 8:50
19
str.match(/.{3}/g); // => ['abc', 'def', 'ghi', 'jkl']
8

Building on the previous answers to this question; the following function will split a string (str) n-number (size) of characters.

function chunk(str, size) {
    return str.match(new RegExp('.{1,' + size + '}', 'g'));
}

Demo

(function() {
  function chunk(str, size) {
    return str.match(new RegExp('.{1,' + size + '}', 'g'));
  }
  
  var str = 'HELLO WORLD';
  println('Simple binary representation:');
  println(chunk(textToBin(str), 8).join('\n'));
  println('\nNow for something crazy:');
  println(chunk(textToHex(str, 4), 8).map(function(h) { return '0x' + h }).join('  '));
  
  // Utiliy functions, you can ignore these.
  function textToBin(text) { return textToBase(text, 2, 8); }
  function textToHex(t, w) { return pad(textToBase(t,16,2), roundUp(t.length, w)*2, '00'); }
  function pad(val, len, chr) { return (repeat(chr, len) + val).slice(-len); }
  function print(text) { document.getElementById('out').innerHTML += (text || ''); }
  function println(text) { print((text || '') + '\n'); }
  function repeat(chr, n) { return new Array(n + 1).join(chr); }
  function textToBase(text, radix, n) {
    return text.split('').reduce(function(result, chr) {
      return result + pad(chr.charCodeAt(0).toString(radix), n, '0');
    }, '');
  }
  function roundUp(numToRound, multiple) { 
    if (multiple === 0) return numToRound;
    var remainder = numToRound % multiple;
    return remainder === 0 ? numToRound : numToRound + multiple - remainder;
  }
}());
#out {
  white-space: pre;
  font-size: 0.8em;
}
<div id="out"></div>

2

My solution (ES6 syntax):

const source = "8d7f66a9273fc766cd66d1d";
const target = [];
for (
    const array = Array.from(source);
    array.length;
    target.push(array.splice(0,2).join(''), 2));

We could even create a function with this:

function splitStringBySegmentLength(source, segmentLength) {
    if (!segmentLength || segmentLength < 1) throw Error('Segment length must be defined and greater than/equal to 1');
    const target = [];
    for (
        const array = Array.from(source);
        array.length;
        target.push(array.splice(0,segmentLength).join('')));
    return target;
}

Then you can call the function easily in a reusable manner:

const source = "8d7f66a9273fc766cd66d1d";
const target = splitStringBySegmentLength(source, 2);

Cheers

1
function chunk(er){
return er.match(/.{1,75}/g).join('\n');
}

Above function is what I use for Base64 chunking. It will create a line break ever 75 characters.

  • Could also do replace(/.{1,75}/g, '$&\n'). – alex Jan 15 '16 at 8:41
1

Here we intersperse a string with another string every n characters:

export const intersperseString = (n: number, intersperseWith: string, str: string): string => {

  let ret = str.slice(0,n), remaining = str;

  while (remaining) {
    let v = remaining.slice(0, n);
    remaining = remaining.slice(v.length);
    ret += intersperseWith + v;
  }

  return ret;

};

if we use the above like so:

console.log(splitString(3,'|', 'aagaegeage'));

we get:

aag|aag|aeg|eag|e

and here we do the same, but push to an array:

export const sperseString = (n: number, str: string): Array<string> => {

  let ret = [], remaining = str;

  while (remaining) {
    let v = remaining.slice(0, n);
    remaining = remaining.slice(v.length);
    ret.push(v);
  }

  return ret;

};

and then run it:

console.log(sperseString(5, 'foobarbaztruck'));

we get:

[ 'fooba', 'rbazt', 'ruck' ]

if someone knows of a way to simplify the above code, lmk, but it should work fine for strings.

1
const chunkStr = (str, n, acc) => {     
    if (str.length === 0) {
        return acc
    } else {
        acc.push(str.substring(0, n));
        return chunkStr(str.substring(n), n, acc);
    }
}
const str = 'abcdefghijkl';
const splittedString = chunkStr(str, 3, []);

Clean solution without REGEX

0

Some clean solution without using regular expressions:

/**
* Create array with maximum chunk length = maxPartSize
* It work safe also for shorter strings than part size
**/
function convertStringToArray(str, maxPartSize){

  const chunkArr = [];
  let leftStr = str;
  do {

    chunkArr.push(leftStr.substring(0, maxPartSize));
    leftStr = leftStr.substring(maxPartSize, leftStr.length);

  } while (leftStr.length > 0);

  return chunkArr;
};

Usage example - https://jsfiddle.net/maciejsikora/b6xppj4q/.

I also tried to compare my solution to regexp one which was chosen as right answer. Some test can be found on jsfiddle - https://jsfiddle.net/maciejsikora/2envahrk/. Tests are showing that both methods have similar performance, maybe on first look regexp solution is little bit faster, but judge it Yourself.

0

With .split:

var arr = str.split( /(?<=^(?:.{3})+)(?!$)/ )  // [ 'abc', 'def', 'ghi', 'jkl' ]

and .replace will be:

var replaced = str.replace( /(?<=^(.{3})+)(?!$)/g, ' || ' )  // 'abc || def || ghi || jkl'



/(?!$)/ is to to stop before end/$/, without is:

var arr      = str.split( /(?<=^(?:.{3})+)/ )        // [ 'abc', 'def', 'ghi', 'jkl' ]     // I don't know why is not [ 'abc', 'def', 'ghi', 'jkl' , '' ], comment?
var replaced = str.replace( /(?<=^(.{3})+)/g, ' || ')  // 'abc || def || ghi || jkl || '

ignoring group /(?:...)/ is no need in .replace but in .split is adding groups to arr:

var arr = str.split( /(?<=^(.{3})+)(?!$)/ )  // [ 'abc', 'abc', 'def', 'abc', 'ghi', 'abc', 'jkl' ]

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