2

I was reading this blog :- https://developerinsider.co/why-is-one-loop-so-much-slower-than-two-loops/. And I decided to check it out using C++ and Xcode. So, I wrote a simple program given below and when I executed it, I was surprised by the result. Actually the 2nd function was slower compared to the first function contrary to what is stated in the article. Can anyone please help me figure out why this is the case?

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <chrono>
    
using namespace std::chrono;
    
void function1() {
    const int n=100000;
            
    int a1[n], b1[n], c1[n], d1[n];
            
    for(int j=0;j<n;j++){
        a1[j] = 0;
        b1[j] = 0;
        c1[j] = 0;
        d1[j] = 0;
    }
            
    auto start = high_resolution_clock::now();
        
    for(int j=0;j<n;j++){
        a1[j] += b1[j];
        c1[j] += d1[j];
    }
            
    auto stop = high_resolution_clock::now();
    auto duration = duration_cast<microseconds>(stop - start);
        
    std::cout << duration.count() << " Microseconds." << std::endl;  
}
    
void function2() {
    const int n=100000;
            
    int a1[n], b1[n], c1[n], d1[n];
            
    for(int j=0; j<n; j++){
        a1[j] = 0;
        b1[j] = 0;
        c1[j] = 0;
        d1[j] = 0;
    }
            
    auto start = high_resolution_clock::now();
            
    for(int j=0; j<n; j++){
        a1[j] += b1[j];
    }
    
    for(int j=0;j<n;j++){
        c1[j] += d1[j];
    }
            
    auto stop = high_resolution_clock::now();
    auto duration = duration_cast<microseconds>(stop - start);
        
    std::cout << duration.count() << " Microseconds." << std::endl;
}
        
int main(int argc, const char * argv[]) {
    function1();
    function2();
    
    return 0;
}
3
  • 1
    Are you using optimised code? What times are you seeing? Jun 27 '20 at 7:18
  • What was the difference in timings? Could it be random fluctuation? One way to make this easier to show is to run each loop 1000 times within the timer, to see if the first one is consistently slower than the other.
    – Korosia
    Jun 27 '20 at 7:19
  • @Korosia it was consistency around 300 microseconds for 10 iterations. Jun 27 '20 at 7:38
1

The second function iterates twice as many times as the first which means double the conditional branches (which are still quite expensive on modern CPUs) which in turn leads to it being slower. Moreover, the second function has to allocate an additional iterator variable, and it has to increment an iterator variable twice as many times.

There is also one major difference between your code and the demonstrated code in the article: your code allocates its arrays on the stack whereas the article's code allocates its arrays on the heap. This has serious performance implications for how the arrays will behave performance-wise.

The article also mentions that the behavior may not be uniform across different systems and for varying sizes of arrays. His article specifically centers around the implications of disk caching which may or may not be in effect in your code.

4
  • Hi, I have allocated the array using heap this time and ran the experiment for 1000 times, then I took the average of both results. But still, function 2 is perfoming at 5 microseconds on average whereas function 1 took 3.4 microseconds on average. I am expecting function 1 to perform better. Is there anything else I can do about it? Jun 27 '20 at 7:49
  • I am confused. You stated that function 1 took 3.4 microseconds and function 2 took 5 microseconds. If that is the case, then function 1 is performing better: it is taking less time to execute. Did you mean it the other way around? Jun 27 '20 at 8:38
  • The stack and heap have different allocation and deallocation performance but they should have the same usage performance in general Jun 27 '20 at 19:02
  • I am aware that they will normally have similar performance in terms of usage. However, considering that stack memory (to my knowledge) normally isn't disk cached, and the question is centered around the implication of disk caching on performance, I thought it was worth mentioning. NOTE: Please correct me if I am wrong here. Jun 27 '20 at 23:11
1

The reasons why the second is faster in your case (I do not think that this works on any machine) is better cpu caching at the point at ,which you cpu has enough cache to store the arrays, the stuff your OS requires and so on, the second function will probably be much slower than the first. from a performance standpoint. I doubt that the two loop code will give better performance if there are enough other programs running as well, because the second function has obviously worse efficiency then the first and if there is enough other stuff cached the performance lead throw caching will be eliminated.

1
  • Yeah this makes sense, using two for loops when you have sufficient cache is better. One more thing - does the compiler do any of these optimisations on his own like loop fission or loop fusion etc checking if there is enough cache, if there is , then not performing loop fission, if there is not enough cache, then performing loop fission etc? Jun 27 '20 at 8:04

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