3

Let's say I have two Numpy arrays:

a = np.array([1,2,2,3,3,3])
b = np.array([2,2,3])

and I would like to remove all elements in b from a the same amount of times they occur in b. I.e.

diff(a, b)
>>> np.array([1,3,3])

Note that for my use case, b will always be a subset of a and both might be unordered, however the set-like methods like numpy.setdiff1d doesn't cut it, since it's important to remove each element a certain amount of times.

My current, lazy solution looks as follows:

def diff(a, b):
    for el in b:
        idx = (el == a).argmax()
        if a[idx] == el:
            a = np.delete(a, idx)
    return a

But I'm wondering if there are more performant or more compact, "numpy-esque" ways of writing this?

  • 1
    Ordered: You could for loop over and toggle bits inside a mask, then apply that mask to the numpy array. Probably much faster than recreating the array repeatedly with np.delete. – Mateen Ulhaq Jun 27 at 18:18
  • Does the array need to be ordered? Can it be unordered? Or do you always need to delete left to right? – Mateen Ulhaq Jun 27 at 18:22
  • Unordered: (1): np.unique with counts, then reconstruct an array using the values from that. (2): use an enumerate-like idea where you pair each array item a unique index, then take the set difference with the result. – Mateen Ulhaq Jun 27 at 18:23
  • @MateenUlhaq Sure, but preferably I'd like the speedup by doing this solely with numpy and not resort to a for loop solution. If possible. – Johan Dettmar Jun 27 at 18:23
  • @MateenUlhaq might be unordered as well, updated the post. – Johan Dettmar Jun 27 at 18:25
3

Here's a vectorized approach based on np.searchsorted -

import pandas as pd

def diff_v2(a, b):
    # Get sorted orders
    sidx = a.argsort(kind='stable')
    A = a[sidx]
    
    # Get searchsorted indices per sorted order
    idx = np.searchsorted(A,b)
    
    # Get increments
    s = pd.Series(idx)
    inc = s.groupby(s).cumcount().values
    
    # Delete elemnents off traced back positions
    return np.delete(a,sidx[idx+inc])

Further optimization

Let's resort to NumPy for the groupby cumcount part -

# Perform groupby cumcount on sorted array
def groupby_cumcount(idx):
    mask = np.r_[False,idx[:-1]==idx[1:],False]
    ids = mask[:-1].cumsum()
    count = np.diff(np.flatnonzero(~mask))
    return ids - np.repeat(ids[~mask[:-1]],count)

def diff_v3(a, b):
    # Get sorted orders
    sidx = a.argsort(kind='stable')
    A = a[sidx]
    
    # Get searchsorted indices per sorted order
    idx = np.searchsorted(A,b)
    
    # Get increments
    idx = np.sort(idx)
    inc = groupby_cumcount(idx)
    
    # Delete elemnents off traced back positions
    return np.delete(a,sidx[idx+inc])

Benchmarking

Using a setup with 10000 elements with ~2x repetitions for a and b being half size of a.

In [52]: np.random.seed(0)
    ...: a = np.random.randint(0,5000,10000)
    ...: b = a[np.random.choice(len(a), 5000,replace=False)]

In [53]: %timeit diff(a,b)
    ...: %timeit diff_v2(a,b)
    ...: %timeit diff_v3(a,b)
108 ms ± 821 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)
3.85 ms ± 53.8 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100 loops each)
1.89 ms ± 15.8 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each)

Next up, on 100000 elements -

In [54]: np.random.seed(0)
    ...: a = np.random.randint(0,50000,100000)
    ...: b = a[np.random.choice(len(a), 50000,replace=False)]

In [55]: %timeit diff(a,b)
    ...: %timeit diff_v2(a,b)
    ...: %timeit diff_v3(a,b)
4.45 s ± 20.1 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each)
37.5 ms ± 661 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)
28 ms ± 122 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

For positive numbers and with sorted output

We can use np.bincount -

def diff_v4(a, b):
    C = np.bincount(a)
    C -= np.bincount(b,minlength=len(C))
    return np.repeat(np.arange(len(C)), C)
| improve this answer | |
  • Up for a challenge? – Paul Panzer Jun 27 at 21:07
  • Btw., if it's ok asking here, I tried trying benchit but upon import it dies complaining about qtagg (IIRC) backend. Does it have to be that backend or can I use a different one? – Paul Panzer Jun 27 at 21:09
  • @PaulPanzer Are you trying on a notebook? Also, are you importing matplotlib before importing benchit? And yup timings are close enough :) – Divakar Jun 27 at 21:10
  • Nope, plain python repl. Importing matplotlib or not doesn't seem to make a difference. – Paul Panzer Jun 27 at 21:14
  • @PaulPanzer If you are able to import benchit, can you get me the output off benchit.print_specs()? Is it windows? Seems like I need to do more testing for that. – Divakar Jun 27 at 21:17
3

Here is an approach that is similar but very slightly faster than @Divakar's (at the time of writing, subject to change...).

import numpy as np

def pp():
    if a.dtype.kind == "i":
        small = np.iinfo(a.dtype).min
    else:
        small = -np.inf
    ba = np.concatenate([[small],b,a])
    idx = ba.argsort(kind="stable")
    aux = np.where(idx<=b.size,-1,1)
    aux = aux.cumsum()
    valid = aux==np.maximum.accumulate(aux)
    valid[0] = False
    valid[1:] &= valid[:-1]
    aux2 = np.zeros(ba.size,bool)
    aux2[idx[valid]] = True
    return ba[aux2.nonzero()]

def groupby_cumcount(idx):
    mask = np.r_[False,idx[:-1]==idx[1:],False]
    ids = mask[:-1].cumsum()
    count = np.diff(np.flatnonzero(~mask))
    return ids - np.repeat(ids[~mask[:-1]],count)

def diff_v3():
    # Get sorted orders
    sidx = a.argsort(kind='stable')
    A = a[sidx]
    
    # Get searchsorted indices per sorted order
    idx = np.searchsorted(A,b)
    
    # Get increments
    idx = np.sort(idx)
    inc = groupby_cumcount(idx)
    
    # Delete elemnents off traced back positions
    return np.delete(a,sidx[idx+inc])

np.random.seed(0)
a = np.random.randint(0,5000,10000)
b = a[np.random.choice(len(a), 5000,replace=False)]

from timeit import timeit

print(timeit(pp,number=100)*10)
print(timeit(diff_v3,number=100)*10)
print((pp() == diff_v3()).all())

np.random.seed(0)
a = np.random.randint(0,50000,100000)
b = a[np.random.choice(len(a), 50000,replace=False)]

print(timeit(pp,number=10)*100)
print(timeit(diff_v3,number=10)*100)
print((pp() == diff_v3()).all())

Sample run:

1.4644702401710674
1.6345531499246135
True
22.230969095835462
24.67835019924678
True

Update: corresponding timings for @MateenUlhaq's dedup_unique:

7.986748410039581
81.83312350302003

Please note that the results produced by this function are not (at least not trivially) identical to Divakar's and mine.

| improve this answer | |
2

Your method:

def dedup_reference(a, b):
    for el in b:
        idx = (el == a).argmax()
        if a[idx] == el:
            a = np.delete(a, idx)
    return a

Scan method with sorting of inputs required:

def dedup_scan(arr, sel):
    arr.sort()
    sel.sort()
    mask = np.ones_like(arr, dtype=np.bool)
    sel_idx = 0
    for i, x in enumerate(arr):
        if sel_idx == sel.size:
            break
        if x == sel[sel_idx]:
            mask[i] = False
            sel_idx += 1
    return arr[mask]

np.unique counting method:

def dedup_unique(arr, sel):
    d_arr = dict(zip(*np.unique(arr, return_counts=True)))
    d_sel = dict(zip(*np.unique(sel, return_counts=True)))
    d = {k: v - d_sel.get(k, 0) for k, v in d_arr.items()}
    res = np.empty(sum(d.values()), dtype=arr.dtype)
    idx = 0
    for k, count in d.items():
        res[idx:idx+count] = k
        idx += count
    return res

You could perhaps accomplish the same as above through some clever use of the numpy set functions (e.g. np.in1d), but I don't think it's any faster than just using dictionaries.


Here is one lazy attempt at benchmarking (updated to include @Divakar's diff_v2 and diff_v3 methods, too):

>>> def timeit_ab(f, n=10):
...     cmd = f"{f}(a.copy(), b.copy())"
...     t = timeit(cmd, globals=globals(), number=n) / n
...     print("{:.4f} {}".format(t, f))

>>> array_copy = lambda x, y: None

>>> funcs = [
...     'array_copy',
...     'dedup_reference',
...     'dedup_scan',
...     'dedup_unique',
...     'diff_v2',
...     'diff_v3',
... ]

>>> def run_test(maxval, an, bn):
...     global a, b
...     a = np.random.randint(maxval, size=an)
...     b = np.random.choice(a, size=bn, replace=False)
...     for f in funcs:
...         timeit_ab(f)

>>> run_test(10**1, 10000, 5000)
0.0000 array_copy
0.0617 dedup_reference
0.0035 dedup_scan
0.0004 dedup_unique     (*)
0.0020 diff_v2
0.0009 diff_v3

>>> run_test(10**2, 10000, 5000)
0.0000 array_copy
0.0643 dedup_reference
0.0037 dedup_scan
0.0007 dedup_unique     (*)
0.0023 diff_v2
0.0013 diff_v3

>>> run_test(10**3, 10000, 5000)
0.0000 array_copy
0.0641 dedup_reference
0.0041 dedup_scan
0.0022 dedup_unique
0.0027 diff_v2
0.0016 diff_v3          (*)

>>> run_test(10**4, 10000, 5000)
0.0000 array_copy
0.0635 dedup_reference
0.0041 dedup_scan
0.0082 dedup_unique
0.0029 diff_v2
0.0015 diff_v3          (*)

>>> run_test(10**5, 10000, 5000)
0.0000 array_copy
0.0635 dedup_reference
0.0041 dedup_scan
0.0118 dedup_unique
0.0031 diff_v2
0.0016 diff_v3          (*)

>>> run_test(10**6, 10000, 5000)
0.0000 array_copy
0.0627 dedup_reference
0.0043 dedup_scan
0.0126 dedup_unique
0.0032 diff_v2
0.0016 diff_v3          (*)

Takeaways:

  • dedup_reference slows down significantly as the number of duplicates increases.
  • dedup_unique is fastest if the range of values is small. diff_v3 is pretty fast and does not depend on the range of values.
  • Array copy times are negligible.
  • Dictionaries are pretty cool.

The performance characteristics strongly depend on both the amount of data (not tested), and also the statistical distributions of the data. I recommend testing the methods with your own data and picking the fastest. Note that the various solutions produce different outputs, and make different assumptions about the inputs.

| improve this answer | |

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