2

I'm listening for user input on a webpage using javacript. When that occurs I want to wait until some property of an element has changed and then run some code. I thought I had this working but recently my code is timing out waiting for the change to occur. I've set the element of interest to a variable and in Chrome Developer tools in the console that variable still shows the old property value, even though the website has clearly changed. It seems as though my instance of the element is stale and no longer up to date. Here's the code with a more concrete question at the end. Note I'm a novice javascript coder so the timeout code may be not the right way of doing things.


var tagFromError;
const ACTIVE_SHEET_TAB_CLASS = 'docs-sheet-active-tab';

function respondToAddSheet(){
   console.log('adding worked');
}

function addSheetCalled(){
    var hSheet = getHSheetByVSheet(activeTag);
    if (hSheet) {
        waitUntilNotActiveSheet(0, hSheet, respondToAddSheet);
    }
}

/**
 * Calls a function once the input tag is no longer active
 * @param {number} i - A counter on how many times the function has been called
 * @param {HTMLElement} tag - hsheet tag which is initially active
 * @param {function} fcn - Function to call when 'tag' is no longer active
 */
function waitUntilNotActiveSheet(i,tag,fcn){

    if (tag.classList.contains(ACTIVE_SHEET_TAB_CLASS)){
        if (i < 20) {
            setTimeout(function () {
                waitUntilNotActiveSheet(i+1, tag, fcn)
            },200)
        }else{
            console.log('Below is the tag which failed')
            tagFromError = tag; //Promote to global for debugging
            console.log(tag)
            console.log('TIMEOUT FAILURE for ' + 'waitUntilNotActiveSheet');
        }
    }else{
        //When no longer active, call the function
        fcn(tag);
    }
}

var addSheetButton = document.querySelector('.docs-sheet-add');
addSheetButton.addEventListener('mousedown',addSheetCalled);

Basically, I wait until the tag no longer contains a particular class name. However, this code is failing because at the end the class name is still present, even though visual inspection of the DOM shows it is not.

Here's the start of the logged tag (either from the error logging or the stored global variable): <div class="goog-inline-block docs-sheet-tab docs-material docs-sheet-active-tab" role="button" aria-expanded="false" aria-haspopup="true" id=":1u">

This shows it still has the active tab name, even though visual inspection of the DOM shows that not to be the case.

  • @hev1 This code is part of an extension that I'm writing with Google Sheets. I'm not entirely sure how to provide an example although I can add the missing global variables (will do in a sec) – Jimbo Jun 28 at 1:54
  • The function seems to work logically; what does respondToAddSheet do? – Pavlos Karalis Jun 28 at 2:23
  • @PavlosKaralis It changes the appearance of some other code. I'm creating a vertical sheet selector so when a new sheet is added I need to update the vertical list and change the names to indicate that the new sheet is active. I'm not even getting to that point though, and sometimes it works, sometimes the code doesn't, so it seems like a race condition but I'm not sure why. I'll add the initializing code as well. – Jimbo Jun 28 at 2:26
  • What user action causes the active class to be removed? Can you show that portion? – Pavlos Karalis Jun 28 at 2:28
  • @PavlosKaralis Good question. I've updated the question to show my listener being added. If you define respondToAddSheet as some basic function (e.g. console logging) you could presumably add this to Google Sheets and test it by opening a sheet, making sure the code is loaded somehow (I'm using an extension), then clicking new sheet. Again, the code works, but not always ... – Jimbo Jun 28 at 2:33
0

I was having async issues with the document.querySelector calls so I added async/await syntax;

also added a period to the value of ACTIVE_SHEET_TAB_CLASS:

const ACTIVE_SHEET_TAB_CLASS = '.docs-sheet-active-tab';

and had to change one of the conditionals to:

sheetElements[i].textContent == sheetName.substr(1).trim()

since the sheetName had a 0 and whitespace causing it to never match

Here is the code with the async/syntax which should run without anything added:

var tagFromError;
const ACTIVE_SHEET_TAB_CLASS = '.docs-sheet-active-tab';

async function addSheetCalled(){
    let activeTag = await document.querySelector(ACTIVE_SHEET_TAB_CLASS);
    let hSheet = await getHSheetByVSheet(activeTag);
    console.log("here!!!!",hSheet)
    if (hSheet) {
        waitUntilNotActiveSheet(0, hSheet, console.log);
    }
}

function waitUntilNotActiveSheet(i,tag,fcn){
    if (tag.classList.contains(ACTIVE_SHEET_TAB_CLASS)){
        if (i < 20) {
            setTimeout(function () {
                waitUntilNotActiveSheet(i+1, tag, fcn)
            },200)
        }else{
            console.log('Below is the tag which failed')
            tagFromError = tag; //Promote to global for debugging
            console.log(tag)
            console.log('TIMEOUT FAILURE for ' + 'waitUntilNotActiveSheet');
        }
    }else{
        //When no longer active, call the function
        fcn("function works!!!",tag);
    }
}

async function getHSheetByVSheet(vSheet){
    //Right now this could be either for the right portion or the parent
  console.log("inside ByVShet", vSheet)
  var sheetName;
    if (vSheet.classList.contains('vsheet-main')){
    vSheet = await vSheet.querySelector('.vsheet-right');
    sheetName = vSheet.textContent;
    return getHSheetByName(sheetName,2);
    } else {
    sheetName = vSheet.textContent;
    console.log("sheetName",sheetName)
    return getHSheetByName(sheetName,2);
  }     
}

async function getHSheetByName(sheetName,type){
    //Do we want:
    //1) the span with the name
    //2) the root tag ...
  //docs-sheet-tab
  console.log("inside HSheetByName", sheetName)
    var sheetElements = await document.getElementsByClassName('docs-sheet-tab-name')
  console.log("sheetElement",sheetElements);
  for (var i = 0; i < sheetElements.length; i++) {
    //sheetName has 0 added at the front and extra white space, must be removed ***important***
        if (sheetElements[i].textContent == sheetName.substr(1).trim()){
  
            if (type == 1) {
        console.log("number 1")
                return sheetElements[i];
            }else{
        console.log("number 2")
                return closestClass(sheetElements[i],'docs-sheet-tab')
            }
        }
  }
  console.log("number 3")
    return null;
}

function closestClass(el, cls) {
  while (el  && el !== document) {
      if (el.classList.contains(cls)) return el;
      el = el.parentNode;
  }
  return null;
}

var addSheetButton = document.querySelector('.docs-sheet-add');
addSheetButton.addEventListener('mousedown',addSheetCalled);

I also did a new query call at the very end to see whether the tag variable was referencing an old instance (though that's not how it should work).

That's when I noticed something; this is the node before I execute the script: enter image description here

this is showing both tag and the new search return the same node after executing the function, but when the new search is delayed in a setTimout it returns null: enter image description here

also, the dom is different now in that the node also has a new id: enter image description here

and then searching the console for the old node returns nothing (why the delayed new search returned null): enter image description here

So it appears a new node may have replaced it, because variables reference a node instance rather than store a snapshot.

Edit: To return the new one I referenced the index of the old one and had to use setTimout to cause a delay:

 }else{
        const allTabs = await document.querySelectorAll('.docs-sheet-tab');
        let index; 
        for(let i = 0; i < allTabs.length ; i ++) {
          console.log("logging id",allTabs[i].getAttribute('id'))
          if(allTabs[i].getAttribute('id') == id) {
            index = i; 
            break;
          }
        }
        console.log("the index is:", index)
        console.log("old tag", tag);
        //When no longer active, call the function
        setTimeout(()=> {
          tag = document.querySelectorAll('.docs-sheet-tab')[index];
          console.log("new tag", tag);
          fcn("function works!!!",tag);
        },500)
        
    }

You can see that now the new node is referenced: enter image description here

Edit: Node before:

let div = document.querySelector('div');

console.log('variable before class added:', div);

div.classList.add('test');

console.log('variable after class added:', div)

div.remove();

//once removed it still returns
console.log('variable after node deleted:', div);

//but not in a new search
console.log('new search after node deleted:', document.querySelector('div'))
<div>test</div>

| improve this answer | |
  • Hi Pavlos, sorry I somehow missed that you had posted an answer. Yes, I later learned that the text content can contain the number of comments on that sheet, which is normally 0, and thus that was a bug. At the end of the day I think the answer to my question, which you've identified, is that basically there is some DOM manipulation going on in which one node is actually replaced with a different node, as indicated by the change in ID, correct? – Jimbo Jul 1 at 1:14
  • I believe so, otherwise the node instance would reflect the changed class. Console logging a variable that contains a deleted node also seems to still return the last instance of that node, even though searching for it returns null. – Pavlos Karalis Jul 1 at 1:22
  • Interesting. I could see there being some disconnecting of elements from the DOM where you still have the variable in memory but you can't search for it. – Jimbo Jul 1 at 1:26
  • Thanks for the pointer on the mouse over in the developer tools showing the ID, I'll have to pay more attention to that. – Jimbo Jul 1 at 1:27
  • I added a code snippet showing node behavior at the end of my answer – Pavlos Karalis Jul 1 at 1:27
1

Pretty much all modern browsers support the JavaScript MutationObserver API, which will automatically fire when the target DOM element changes. For instance, adding or removing a CSS class will trigger it. I would just use that. Way simpler! There are details on how to use it at MDN web docs -- MutationObserver

| improve this answer | |
1

You can use MutationObserver to register a callback to be called anytime an attribute is modified on an element. You can then check if its classes have been modified and whether or not it still has the active class.

Demo:

const p = document.querySelector('p');
const observer = new MutationObserver(function(mutations){
    for(const mutation of mutations){
        if(mutation.attributeName === "class" && //class modified
           /\bactive\b/.test(mutation.oldValue) //active class existed before
     && !mutation.target.classList.contains("active")){//active class no longer exists
            console.log("No longer active");
        }
    }
});
observer.observe(p, {
    attributes: true,
    attributeOldValue: true
});
document.querySelector("#removeActive").addEventListener("click", ()=>p.classList.remove("active"));
document.querySelector("#addActive").addEventListener("click", ()=>p.classList.add("active"));
.active {
    color: dodgerblue;
}
<p class="active test">The content of the body element is displayed in your browser.</p>
<button id="removeActive">
Remove Active Class
</button>
<button id="addActive">
Add Active Class
</button>

| improve this answer | |
  • How do I ensure that my mutation hasn't already occurred? If I just check first that it is still active before adding the observer, will I run into any race condition issues? Also, why is there the mismatch? I was hoping there was some obvious reason for the mismatch. – Jimbo Jun 28 at 2:23
  • @Jimbo The code I have provided already tests for that. No, I do not believe there will be race conditions. – hev1 Jun 28 at 2:25
  • Sorry, I see that my question was confusing. Ideally I would have the observer added at program start. However, my question was, if I was in a listener (in my example addSheetCalled and wanted to add the observer there, would I run into any issues. It seems like if the change has already occurred (because of another listener), then starting to wait for a change would be a problem. So I could just check in my listener if we're already set (no longer active) before setting the observer. That's where I was concerned about timing. If I set my observer at program start then I'm not worried. – Jimbo Jun 28 at 2:39

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