6

I want to launch a script and get the exit status in C++. But I noticed that the exit status of a system command always has a left shift of 8 bits. Why does the system function do that?

Sample code:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int exit_code_0 = system("exit 0") >> 8;
    int exit_code_1 = system("exit 1") >> 8;
    int exit_code_2 = system("exit 2") >> 8;
    int exit_code_3 = system("exit 3") >> 8;
    int exit_code_4 = system("exit 4") >> 8;
    int exit_code_255 = system("exit 255")>> 8;
    cout<<"Exit code was: " << exit_code_0 <<", Expected: 0"<< endl;
    cout<<"Exit code was: " << exit_code_1 <<", Expected: 1"<< endl;
    cout<<"Exit code was: " << exit_code_2 <<", Expected: 2"<< endl;
    cout<<"Exit code was: " << exit_code_3 <<", Expected: 3"<< endl;
    cout<<"Exit code was: " << exit_code_4 <<", Expected: 4"<< endl;
    cout<<"Exit code was: " << exit_code_255 <<", Expected: 255"<< endl;
    
    return 0;
}

Test results:

Exit code was: 0, Expected: 0                                                                                                                                                       
Exit code was: 1, Expected: 1                                                                                                                                                       
Exit code was: 2, Expected: 2                                                                                                                                                       
Exit code was: 3, Expected: 3                                                                                                                                                       
Exit code was: 4, Expected: 4                                                                                                                                                       
Exit code was: 255, Expected: 255
  • 3
    I had made a right shift by 8 for all return codes – Bouraoui Al-Moez L.A Jun 29 at 9:21
  • 1
    and what are the codes before you shift them down? do they, for example, contain the same 8 bits on both bits 0~7 and bits 8~15? – underscore_d Jun 29 at 9:22
  • 1
    And what was on those eight least significant bits, which you shift out? – CiaPan Jun 29 at 9:23
  • 3
    On POSIX systems (like Linux or macOS) the full int is split into different parts. To fully understand it you need to learn about the exec family of functions and the wait family of functions. – Some programmer dude Jun 29 at 9:24
  • 1
    seems like a dupe of Exit Codes from system() not as expected – underscore_d Jun 29 at 9:32
10

In the C and C++ standards, system returns an implementation-defined value.

In POSIX systems, the return value contains a combination of different values, which can be extracted with macros. To get the program's exit status, you use WEXITSTATUS(return_value), which on your system is defined to be a right shift by 8. The lower 8 bits contain other values (letting you determine, for example, if the program exited normally or due to a signal, etc.)

| improve this answer | |
  • Is WEXITSTATUS for linux OS only? If yes what's the macro for windows? – Bouraoui Al-Moez L.A Jun 29 at 9:30
  • 2
    It's for POSIX. Windows is not POSIX compatible. – KamilCuk Jun 29 at 9:30
5

You are supposed to read the return value using

WEXITSTATUS(code)

https://man7.org/linux/man-pages/man3/system.3.html

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