var d = new Date();
    var today_date = d.getDate() + '/' + month_name[d.getMonth()] + '/' + d.getFullYear();

This is how I am getting a date. It works with a slight problem. For todays date 7th of June 2011 it returns 7/11/2011, what i want it to return is 07/11/2011?

Anyone know how?

  • If you are using Jquery change the format in the script available – Dorababu Meka Jun 7 '11 at 9:53
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Like so:

("0"+1).slice(-2);  // returns 01
("0"+10).slice(-2); // returns 10

Complete example:

var d = new Date(2011,1,1); // 1-Feb-2011
var today_date =
    ("0" + d.getDate()).slice(-2) + "/" +
    ("0" + (d.getMonth() + 1)).slice(-2) + "/" + 
    d.getFullYear();
// 01/02/2011
  • Month names should be 01 02 03 etc not Jan Feb but apart from that thans it worked – Beginner Jun 7 '11 at 10:06
  • @Beginner: I've made minor change to my answer – Salman A Jun 7 '11 at 10:17

Well, you could simply check the length of d.getDate()and if it's 1 then you add a zero at the beginning. But you would like to take a look at format() to format your dates?

Try this (http://blog.stevenlevithan.com/archives/date-time-format):

var d = new Date();
d.format("dd/mm/yyyy"); 

Try this, this is more understandable.:

  var currentTime = new Date();
  var day = currentTime.getDate();
  var month = currentTime.getMonth() + 1;
  var year = currentTime.getFullYear();

  if (day < 10){
  day = "0" + day;
  }

  if (month < 10){
  month = "0" + month;
  }

  var today_date = day + "/" + month + "/" + year;
  document.write(today_date.toString());

And result is :

07/05/2011

  • 1
    I like this solution. Its less cryptic. Will make it easier for thos following behind me. I did make a small change. var month = currentTime.getMonth(); gives you the month number starting at 0, so to get the current month in a 1-12 format I did var month = currentTime.getMonth() + 1; – Grayson Jun 17 '14 at 16:20
  • Thanks @Grayson for pointing me out this "month issue". I've updated my answer. Unfortunately sometimes javascript doesn't comply with principle of least astonishment – Michał Kuliński Jun 20 '14 at 9:57

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.