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I am trying to price a type of leveraged down-and-out (LDAO) barrier call option, using geometric Brownian motion.

My python script is below. I am not sure how to correctly model the increasing barrier B and leverage factor that multiplies the payoff when the stock price goes up.

The characteristics of this option are as follows.

  1. The "leveraged" part op the LDAO looks like this. When you buy the call, you only pay part of the spot price S0 of the underlying asset. The seller provides financing F0 to buy the rest. In other words, the buying price P of the option is: P = S -/- F.
  2. As a buyer, you pay interest i on the financing level F.
  3. The "down-and-out" part is structured as follows. When the price S of the underlying drops below the barrier B, the option is cancelled and the underlying asset is sold at the active market price. When the spot price S1 is lower than the financing F, your end value is zero. If the spot price is higher than the financing, your payout is S1 - F1 (F1 includes the interest). Your payout cannot be negative.
  4. The barrier B is increased daily by the amount of the interest on the financing level F. So B1 = B0 + F*(1 + i)^t
  5. The barrier B is always below the price of the underlying asset, but above the financing level: S0 > B > F

I have tried to implement this in the Python 3 script below. Any suggestions on how to get this right?

import numpy as np
from math import log, e

P = 30 # This is what you pay (S -/- F)
S = 360 # spot price of the stock
K = 340 Exercise price is equal to the stop-loss barrier (as far as I understand it)
B = 340 # the stop-loss barrier at which the option is cancelled
F = 330 # The financing level
T = 1 # Time to maturity. But in priciple, the option runs indefintely as long as S > B
i = 0.02 # Annualised interest rate on the financing F
r = 0.00135 # Risk-free rate of return
impliedVolatility = 0.3
num_reps = 100 

def barrier_option(option_type, s0, strike, B, F, maturity, i, r, sigma, num_reps):
    payoff_sum = 0
    for j in range(num_reps):
        st = S
        st = st*e**((r-0.5*sigma**2)*maturity + sigma*np.sqrt(maturity)*np.random.normal(0, 1))
        B_shift = B + F*(1+i)*np.sqrt(maturity) # Here the interest I on F gets adjusted by increasing B
        non_touch = (np.min(st) > B_shift)*1
        if option_type == 'c':
            payoff = max(0,st-strike)
        elif option_type == 'p':
            payoff = max(0,strike-st)
        payoff_sum += non_touch * payoff
    premium = (payoff_sum/float(num_reps))*e**(-r*maturity)
    return premium

Bar = barrier_option('c', S, K, B, F, (T*252)/365, i, r, impliedVolatility, num_reps)```
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Q : "Any suggestions on how to get this right?"

  • make the process iterative and s0-dependent, the original is not,
  • make the process more computation-efficient, you re-compute constant values num_reps times
  • make the process revised as per B_shift being a constant value, while the remark indicated some evolution
  • make the process revised as per st, if it were not in np.min( st ), which may reflect a vectorised-form of the original code-design intent, this was not added her.
import numpy as np

P =  30       # This is what you pay (S -/- F)
S = 360       # spot price of the stock
K = 340       # Exercise price is equal to the stop-loss barrier (as far as I understand it)
B = 340       # the stop-loss barrier at which the option is cancelled
F = 330       # The financing level
T =   1       # Time to maturity. But in priciple, the option runs indefintely as long as S > B
i =   0.02    # Annualised interest rate on the financing F
r =   0.00135 # Risk-free rate of return

impliedVolatility =   0.3
num_reps          = 100

def barrier_option( option_type, # the option-type { 'c': CALL | 'p': PUT }
                    s0,          # the spot price of the option underlying asset
                    strike,      # the strike price
                    B,           # the stop-loss barrier at which the option is cancelled
                    F,           # the financing level
                    maturity,    # the option time to maturity
                    i,           # the annualised interest rate on financing F
                    r,           # the risk-free rate of returns
                    sigma,       # the sigma - implied volatility
                    num_reps     # the number of repetitions
                    ):
    """                                                                 __doc__ [DOC-ME] [TEST-ME] [PERF-ME]
    SYNTAX:     barrier_option( option_type, # the option-type { 'c': CALL | 'p': PUT }
                                s0,          # the spot price of the option underlying asset
                                strike,      # the strike price
                                B,           # the stop-loss barrier at which the option is cancelled
                                F,           # the financing level
                                maturity,    # the option time to maturity
                                i,           # the annualised interest rate on financing F
                                r,           # the risk-free rate of returns
                                sigma,       # the sigma - implied volatility
                                num_reps     # the number of repetitions
                                )
    PARAMETERS: a string        option_type, # the option-type { 'c': CALL | 'p': PUT }
                a float-alike   s0,          # the spot price of the option underlying asset
                a float-alike   strike,      # the strike price
                a float-alike   B,           # the stop-loss barrier at which the option is cancelled
                a float-alike   F,           # the financing level
                a float-alike   maturity,    # the option time to maturity
                a float-alike   i,           # the annualised interest rate on financing F
                a float-alike   r,           # the risk-free rate of returns
                a float-alike   sigma,       # the sigma - implied volatility
                an  int-alike   num_reps     # the number of repetitions
    
    RETURNS:    a float
    
    THROWS:     ValueError on inappropriate option_type specifier
    
    EXAMPLE:    
    
    """
    if option_type not in ( 'c', 'p' ): #...............................# FUSE: protect your own code
       raise ValueError( "EXC: a call to barrier_option() contained an illegal option-type specifier {0:}".format( repr( option_type ) ) )
    
    payoff_sum = 0                                                      # initial settings
    st         = S # initial settings ..................................# shan't be here the sO-parameter from the call-signature, instead of a reference to a global S ?
    
    const_sqrtMATURITY =                 np.sqrt( maturity )
    const_1stPartOfEXP = ( r - ( sigma**2 )*0.5 )*maturity
    const_2ndPartOfEXP =         sigma *const_sqrtMATURITY
    const_B_shift      = B + F*(1 + i) *const_sqrtMATURITY
    
    for j in range( num_reps ): #.......................................# PERF:
        #t = S                                                          # removed from loop, it will restore the referenced global S into a local st for each loop again, which is re-shortcutting the process
        #t = st*e**( ( r - 0.5 * sigma**2 ) * maturity + sigma * np.sqrt( maturity ) * np.random.normal( 0, 1 ) )
        #...............................................................# improved PERF: re-use const-s, that are loop-invariant
        st*= np.exp(                          const_1stPartOfEXP        #                 100 x const re-used
                   + np.random.normal(0, 1) * const_2ndPartOfEXP        #                 100 x const re-used
                     )
        #_shift = B + F * ( 1 + i ) * np.sqrt( maturity )               # Here the interest I on F gets adjusted by increasing B
        #...............................................................#                               REVISE: THE increasing B NOT VISIBLE ANYWHERE IN THE ORIGNAL CODE - IS IT CORRECT ?
        #...............................................................# improved PERF: avoid re-calculations of a const, that is loop-invariant
        #non_touch  =                                                                               ( np.min(st) >       B_shift ) * 1     # REVISE: the code here may first meet a vector-ised kind of st: np.min(st)
        payoff_sum += ( max( 0, st - strike ) if option_type == 'c' else max( 0, strike - st ) ) if ( np.min(st) > const_B_shift ) else 0. # REVISE: the code here may first meet a vector-ised kind of st: np.min(st)
        
    #remium = (payoff_sum/float(num_reps))*e**(-r*maturity)
    #eturn premium
    #...................................................................# improved PERF: avoid creation of named variables just to RET a value ( variables & namespace management operations are non-zero expenses )
    return ( payoff_sum * np.exp( -r * maturity ) ) / float( num_reps ) # improved (im)precission

Bar = barrier_option( 'c',                   
                       S, K, B, F,            
                       ( T * 252 ) / 365.,      #..... be self-consistent, if 've used float( num_reps ) inside, fuse-protect with decimal point also elsewhere, in spite of Py3 "tolerating" in how to handle the int-divisors, which Py2 is not
                       i, r, impliedVolatility, 
                       num_reps
                       )
| improve this answer | |
  • Yes, this is much better. Much more efficient. You are right that it is much better to get the s0-parameter from the call-signature, rather than from the global S. Regarding the B_shift variable, I think it may have to be in the loop. This is because the interest is charged daily, so that the barrier B shifts slightly upward everyday. – twhale Jul 1 at 12:29
  • I think I made a mistake in the payoff also. This option does not have a time value, only intrinsic value. So the price of a call is ``` P = S - F```, Where F is also updated with the same daily amount with which B is updated (so daily interest is i / 365). – twhale Jul 1 at 12:42

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