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After a git pull origin master I get the following message:

warning: Pulling without specifying how to reconcile divergent branches is
discouraged. You can squelch this message by running one of the following
commands sometime before your next pull:

  git config pull.rebase false  # merge (the default strategy)
  git config pull.rebase true   # rebase
  git config pull.ff only       # fast-forward only

You can replace "git config" with "git config --global" to set a default
preference for all repositories. You can also pass --rebase, --no-rebase,
or --ff-only on the command line to override the configured default per
invocation.

remote: Enumerating objects: 4, done.
remote: Counting objects: 100% (4/4), done.
remote: Compressing objects: 100% (4/4), done.
remote: Total 4 (delta 0), reused 0 (delta 0), pack-reused 0
Unpacking objects: 100% (4/4), 51.49 KiB | 850.00 KiB/s, done.

Then the pull has been done successfully. But still, I have doubts about this message.
What is the best thing to do in this case?

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    File a bug report that the warning is confusing. One option should be "recommended" and the warning should only show on request and not just because a version change happened. Lot's of automatic scripts might break now with this unexpected behaviour. – Wolfgang Fahl Jul 17 '20 at 9:07
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    @WolfgangFahl, the warning shouldn't affect any scripts as it continues to retain the default behaviour until explicitly changed. It shouldn't cause the pull to return a non-zero exit code (given it's a warning, not an error). A few CI/CD scripts that I have deployed accross various servers continue to work with the success rate unaffected. – Qumber Jul 18 '20 at 23:03
  • @Qumber - thanks for the comment. Crontab entries will e.g. start sending e-mail if output appears that wasn't there or could be filtered with a simple grep. Unexpected output can have all kinds of side effects. – Wolfgang Fahl Jul 20 '20 at 15:55
  • @WolfgangFahl, Every pull usually has some different output. So, any script that depends solely on that is probably badly written. Also, one should not upgrade a production environment without extensive testing. I prefer to not upgrade prod at all. Instead, I create a new instance with latest everything, host my apps there, test everything out, and then make it production. – Qumber Oct 14 '20 at 6:03
455

In its default mode, git pull is shorthand for git fetch followed by git merge FETCH_HEAD.

When you do a git pull origin master,
git pull performs a merge, which often creates a merge commit. Therefore, by default, pulling from the remote is NOT a harmless operation: it can create a new commit sha that didn’t exist before. This behavior can confuse a user, because what feels like it should be a harmless download operation actually changes the commit history in unpredictable ways.

To avoid this, you need

git pull --ff-only

(or not? read on to see which one fits your requirements)

With git pull --ff-only, Git will update your branch only if it can be “fast-forwarded” without creating new commits. If this can’t be done, git pull --ff-only simply aborts with an error message.

You can configure your Git client to always use --ff-only by default, so you get this behavior even if you forget the command-line flag:

git config --global pull.ff only

Note: The --global flag applies the change for all repositories on your machine. If you want this behaviour only for the repository you're in, omit the flag.

Taken from here



This warning was added in Git 2.27.

This is what the complete warning looks like:

Pulling without specifying how to reconcile divergent branches is discouraged. You can squelch this message by running one of the following commands sometime before your next pull:

git config pull.rebase false     # merge (the default strategy)
git config pull.rebase true      # rebase
git config pull.ff only               # fast-forward only

You can replace "git config" with "git config --global" to set a default preference for all repositories. You can also pass --rebase, --no-rebase, or --ff-only on the command line to override the configured default per invocation.

The warning presents three commands as options, all of these will suppress the warning. But they serve different purposes:

git config pull.rebase false     # merge (the default strategy)

This keeps the default behaviour and suppresses the warning.

git config pull.rebase true      # rebase

This actually commits on top of the remote branch, maintaining a single branch both locally and remotely (unlike the default behaviour where two different branches are involved - one on local and the other on remote - and, to combine the two, a merge is performed).

git config pull.ff only          # fast-forward only

This only performs the pull if the local branch can be fast-forwarded. If not, it simply aborts with an error message (and does not create any commits).


Update:

If you have Git 2.29 or above, you can now set pull.ff to false, true or only to get rid of the warning.

git config pull.ff true

true - This is the default behaviour. Pull is fast-forwarded if possible, otherwise it's merged.

git config pull.ff false

false - Pull is never fast-forwarded, and a merge is always created.

git config pull.ff only

only - Pull is fast-forwarded if possible, otherwise operation is aborted with an error message.

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    I appreciate the time and effort you put into your answer, but frankly this is still completely incomprehensible to me. – Jared Nedzel Aug 21 '20 at 16:52
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    As commented on here, the warning is not affected by whether or not the branch is actually diverging. The initial "Your branch is probably diverging." may be misleading. – Joe Sep 2 '20 at 8:32
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    I have to say, the three options in the message did not work for me to supress the message. However the answer here (git config --global pull.ff only) did. – DiskJunky Sep 9 '20 at 8:38
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    You have included the Git 2.29 option I mentioned below, good point. Upvoted. – VonC Oct 7 '20 at 7:21
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    Thanks for you answer. Helped a lot. I am working only with feature branches. On my develop there are no local changes. Therefore the default will do pretty well for me. But if I used pull.ff and have a conflict, how would I get that problem and what would I do if ff is not possible? – CanO Feb 1 at 17:45
104

This is a new warning added in Git 2.27:

 * "git pull" issues a warning message until the pull.rebase
   configuration variable is explicitly given, which some existing
   users may find annoying---those who prefer not to rebase need to
   set the variable to false to squelch the warning.

To remove the warning, set one of the suggested values to your preferred default behaviour for git pull if you don't specify behaviour on the command line (using --ff, --no-ff, --ff-only, --rebase). In all cases, git will attempt a fast-forward (What is git fast-forwarding?) merge if possible. The settings control what happens when there are changes in your branch but not present in the remote branch.

  git config pull.rebase false  # merge (the default strategy)

This is the existing default behaviour; set this for no warning, and no change in behaviour; git will merge the remote branch into your local one.

  git config pull.rebase true   # rebase

Here, git will attempt to rebase your changes on top of the remote branch. See When should I use git pull --rebase? for more detail on why you might want that.

  git config pull.ff only       # fast-forward only

If a fast-forward merge is not possible, git will refuse to proceed. As Difference between git pull --rebase and git pull --ff-only quotes:

Refuse to merge and exit with a non-zero status unless the current HEAD is already up-to-date or the merge can be resolved as a fast-forward

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    This is actually the most correct answer, because it explains why people (like me) are suddenly seeing this warning after nearly a decade of using git. However,it would be useful if some guidance were given on the options offered. for example, pointing out that setting pull.ff to "only" doesn't prevent you doing a "pull --rebase" to override it. – kdopen Jun 30 '20 at 12:01
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    @tekumara see stackoverflow.com/a/15935584/733345 – Joe Jul 19 '20 at 10:18
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    "when there are changes in your branch but not present in the remote branch." Then it seems to me that git should only throw this warning if that is the case. If I'm pulling my mainline (and the mainline is used properly) I shouldn't need to worry about that. – Keith Tyler Jul 31 '20 at 21:13
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    @Joe I like your answer, and think it's the right answer, but you see this regardless of whether git has actually done anything. I feel that the right time to issue this warning is if git has to do something, then should fail with this message. Not just spam users with this message upfront. Yet another thing that contributes to my love/hate relationship with git. – Jon V Aug 6 '20 at 13:49
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    Joe, thanks for your answer, it helps a lot. I'm not sure I understand what the ff-only flag is about. If git pull fails because ff-only is enabled, then what? At that point one must do a merge or rebase by hand in order to make any progress. So if the goal is to avoid messy dependency graphs, this doesn't change anything -- one way or another, automatically or by hand, your dependency graph will end up a mess. I suppose that if you have to do it by hand, you have more control over it. However I'm guessing that usually people won't know how to avoid a mess any more than the Git itself does. – Robert Dodier Oct 28 '20 at 17:02
27

Run this:

git config pull.ff only

and congratulate yourself that you can get on with your work.

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    Finally!... thank you! – Jim Tierney Apr 30 at 21:46
  • All the answers above are overkill and try hards.. this is the right answer – arled May 13 at 13:23
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git config pull.ff only or equivalently git pull --ff-only is the safest one. The reason is that a rebase can overwrite the history and may cause the loss of commits if another developer has force-pushed to the same branch.

But all of them are valid.

4

Note: Earlier we taught "git pull"(man) to warn when the user does not say the histories need to be merged, rebased or accepts only fast-forwarding, but the warning triggered for those who have set the pull.ff configuration variable.

This is no longer the case (meaning: no more warning) with Git 2.29 (Q4 2020).

See commit 54200ce (24 Sep 2020) by Alex Henrie (alexhenrie).
(Merged by Junio C Hamano -- gitster -- in commit 299deea, 29 Sep 2020)

pull: don't warn if pull.ff has been set

Signed-off-by: Alex Henrie

A user who understands enough to set pull.ff does not need additional instructions.


Before Git 2.31 (Q1 2021), when a user does not tell "git pull"(man) to use rebase or merge, the command gives a loud message telling a user to choose between rebase or merge but creates a merge anyway, forcing users who would want to rebase to redo the operation.

Fix an early part of this problem by tightening the condition to give the message--- there is no reason to stop or force the user to choose between rebase or merge if the history fast-forwards.

See commit 7539fdc, commit b044db9 (14 Dec 2020) by Junio C Hamano (gitster).
See commit c525de3, commit 278f4be, commit 77a7ec6 (12 Dec 2020) by Felipe Contreras (felipec).
(Merged by Junio C Hamano -- gitster -- in commit d3fa84d, 06 Jan 2021)

pull: display default warning only when non-ff

Suggestions-by: Junio C Hamano
Signed-off-by: Felipe Contreras

There's no need to display the annoying warning on every pull... only the ones that are not fast-forward.

The current warning tests still pass, but not because of the arguments or the configuration, but because they are all fast-forward.

We need to test non-fast-forward situations now.

1
  • It's a great edition to show the warning only on non-fast-forward pulls. – Qumber Jan 14 at 5:41

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