1

Given two np.arrays;

a = np.array([1, 6, 5, 3, 8, 345, 34, 6, 2, 867])
b = np.array([867, 8, 34, 75])

I would like to get an np.array with same dimensions as b, where each value is the index where the value in b appears in a, or np.nan if the value in b is not present in a.

The result should be;

[9, 4, 6, nan]

a and b will always have the same number of dimensions, but the sizes of the dimensions may differ.

something like;

(pseudo code)

c = np.where(b in a)

but which works for arrays ("in" does not)

I prefer a "one-liner" or at least a solution that is entirely on array level, and which does not require a loop.

Thx!

6

Approach #1

Here's one with np.searchsorted -

def find_indices(a,b,invalid_specifier=-1):
    # Search for matching indices for each b in sorted version of a. 
    # We use sorter arg to account for the case when a might not be sorted 
    # using argsort on a
    sidx = a.argsort()
    idx = np.searchsorted(a,b,sorter=sidx)

    # Remove out of bounds indices as they wont be matches
    idx[idx==len(a)] = 0

    # Get traced back indices corresponding to original version of a
    idx0 = sidx[idx]
    
    # Mask out invalid ones with invalid_specifier and return
    return np.where(a[idx0]==b, idx0, invalid_specifier)

Output for given sample -

In [41]: find_indices(a, b, invalid_specifier=np.nan)
Out[41]: array([ 9.,  4.,  6., nan])

Approach #2

Another based on lookup for positive numbers -

def find_indices_lookup(a,b,invalid_specifier=-1):
    # Setup array where we will assign ranged numbers
    N = max(a.max(), b.max())+1
    lookup = np.full(N, invalid_specifier)
    
    # We index into lookup with b to trace back the positions. Non matching ones
    # would have invalid_specifier values as wount had been indexed by ranged ones
    lookup[a] = np.arange(len(a))
    indices  = lookup[b]
    return indices

Benchmarking

Efficiency wasn't mentioned as a requirement in the question, but no-loop requirement might go there. Testing out with a setup that tries to reperesent the given sample setup, but scaling it up by 1000x :

In [98]: a = np.random.permutation(np.unique(np.random.randint(0,20000,10000)))

In [99]: b = np.random.permutation(np.unique(np.random.randint(0,20000,4000)))

# Solutions from this post
In [100]: %timeit find_indices(a,b,invalid_specifier=np.nan)
     ...: %timeit find_indices_lookup(a,b,invalid_specifier=np.nan)
1.35 ms ± 127 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each)
220 µs ± 30.9 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)

# @Quang Hoang-soln2
In [101]: %%timeit
     ...: commons, idx_a, idx_b = np.intersect1d(a,b, return_indices=True)
     ...: orders = np.argsort(idx_b)
     ...: output = np.full(b.shape, np.nan)
     ...: output[orders] = idx_a[orders]
1.63 ms ± 59.5 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each)

# @Quang Hoang-soln1
In [102]: %%timeit
     ...: s = b == a[:,None]
     ...: np.where(s.any(0), np.argmax(s,0), np.nan)
137 ms ± 9.25 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)
| improve this answer | |
  • Nice answer thx! but could you elaborate a bit on how it works? – Vinzent Jun 30 at 13:07
2

You can do a broadcast:

s = b == a[:,None]
np.where(s.any(0), np.argmax(s,0), np.nan)

Output:

array([ 9.,  4.,  6., nan])

Update Another solution with intersect1d:

commons, idx_a, idx_b = np.intersect1d(a,b, return_indices=True)

orders = np.argsort(idx_b)

output = np.full(b.shape, np.nan)
output[orders] = idx_a[orders]
| improve this answer | |
  • Awesome thx! but what exactly does argmax do? could you elaborate just a bit on the solution?. – Vinzent Jun 30 at 13:00
  • argmax check for the index of the maximum value along the given axis (this case 0). – Quang Hoang Jun 30 at 13:01

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