0

I have the following table:

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS test;
CREATE TABLE test (
  id SERIAL,
  username varchar(32)
);
INSERT INTO test (username)
VALUES ('Jesse'), ('Jesse'), ('Scott'), ('Scott'), ('John');

I want to delete the lowest ID when there is a duplicate row. I made the following query to find the target rows:

SELECT MIN(id), username
FROM test
GROUP BY username
HAVING count(*) > 1;

When I try to use this in a CTE it ends up deleting every row:

WITH to_delete AS (
  SELECT MIN(id), username
  FROM test
  GROUP BY username
  HAVING count(*) > 1
)
DELETE FROM test
WHERE id IN (
  SELECT id
  FROM to_delete
);

cte


However, when I run the same query and put the CTE as a subquery it works as expected:

DELETE FROM test
WHERE id IN (
  SELECT MIN(id)
  FROM test
  GROUP BY username
  HAVING count(*) > 1
);

subquery

I'm sure there is some logic behind this, but I haven't come across the source in my search. Why does the CTE delete every row, but the subquery work as expected?

2

Adding a column alias to your CTE makes the DELETE work as expected.

with

  to_delete as (
    select
      min(id) as id,
      username
    from
      test
    group by
      username
    having
      count(*) > 1
  )

delete from
  test
where
  id in (
    select
      id
    from
      to_delete
  )
;
table test;

 id │ username
════╪══════════
  7 │ Jesse
  9 │ Scott
 10 │ John
(3 rows)

The IN operator expects a table with a single column. Your subquery only contains one column, so the name doesn't matter (postgres would assign the column the name of the function, so min instead of id). Your CTE contains two columns, so you write a subquery that selects one of them, but it wasn't properly aliased as id.

with

  to_delete as (
    select
      min(id) as id,
      username
    from
      test
    group by
      username
    having
      count(*) > 1
  )

select id from to_delete;

Results in an error

ERROR:  42703: column "id" does not exist
LINE 15: select id from  to_delete;

The interesting thing is that instead of erroring out, the DELETE statement treats the WHERE clause as non-existent and continues to delete everything, which is behavior I wouldn't have expected.

| improve this answer | |
  • Gah, you're right! I had only done SELECT * when testing. I expected an error if I messed something that simple up, I wonder if this is a bug – GammaGames Jun 30 at 17:11
  • 1
    This is not a bug, it is expected behavior. It's because it is using a "correlated sub-query", you can find out more here: wiki.postgresql.org/wiki/… – GammaGames Jun 30 at 19:44

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