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I'm working on a React app and am thinking about implementing a CSRF mitigation technique. I decided to go with Same-Site cookies but before that, I was looking into using CSRF tokens and read numerous posts saying they should be stored in a hidden form field. What I'd like to know is if there is a difference between storing it in a hidden field and storing it in something like a class variable? If the point of it is to keep somewhere for when you a ready to send a request to the server, does it matter how it's stored on the client-side?

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The other answers are correct in that for a tutorial that you find somewhere (or a generic one on csrf) it's easier to demonstrate it with the token being written in form fields, also a traditional web application will just work that way.

What others did not mention is modern single-page applications like one with React do not work like that, often you don't even have forms, and writing the token to form fields makes no sense. So these applications typically do not do that.

There is also a practical aspect to this. You mentioned storing it in a class variable. That's fine, but how will it get there? The token is usually (not necessarily, but that's a sidetrack for now) generated by the server-side web app. How will the javascript SPA get it? You need to write it somewhere in the page, spending a separate request to get it would be a waste of resources. One thing that usually happens is writing it in a meta header (eg. <meta name="csrf" content="...">) at the top of the page so your SPA can read it from there and store it wherever it wants.

Another thing that often happens is csrf protection is not even needed, because api authentication is based on something like request headers (instead of something in a cookie), which would not be sent automatically by the browser, so classic csrf is not feasible.

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    The response body to a http request is the page itself in case of html. We are talking about where in the page. :) In case of a JSON response, you usually don't need explicit csrf protection, because CSRF can only be exploited if authentication information is sent automatically by the browser (eg. a sessionid in a cookie). CSRF cannot be exploited if your app sends a JWT as a request header (eg. Authorization), except Http Basic auth, which is persisted and sent automtically if entered by a user, and as such needs protection from csrf. – Gabor Lengyel Jul 1 at 1:08
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    Somehow you need to authenticate the request, for that you would send some kind of a token. If that's a jwt in a header, you don't need separate csrf protection. If it's a session id or a jwt in a cookie (or anything sent automatically), you need csrf protection that is not sent automatically. So to prevent csrf, you need something that is not automatic. To authenticate a request, you need something suitable for that, which may (eg. jwt in Authorization header) or may not (eg. session cookie) inherently protect against csrf too. – Gabor Lengyel Jul 1 at 2:04
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    Also please note that using a httponly cookie to store auth info (session id or a jwt) is more secure than anything else, because it is protected against xss. If you have a cookie based solution, you should implement separate csrf protection, and not change authentication to token/header based. – Gabor Lengyel Jul 1 at 2:09
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    I appreciate the clarity of your explanations. I usually do only store a jwt in a httponly cookie for that reason. That is why I haven't considered sending it in a header because I know it would be inaccessible by javascript. In which case, it would make sense now to implement the csrf token, right? – krabinowitz Jul 1 at 2:22
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    In that case you need to protect your application from csrf, yes. – Gabor Lengyel Jul 1 at 6:41
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If you put it in a form field then everything typically just works, but if you put the value anywhere else then you have to write logic to extract that value and insert it back into the form data that is being sent to the server.

Using the form field also works for both ajax and standard form submission, so most tutorials are going to promote it over methods that only work for one or the other.

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  • what if the data you're sending to the server isn't from a form? Here I'm using form data means that it's data taken from a form element. But what if you just have something like a button that, when clicked, makes some change to the database? So there isn't necessarily a form that takes any input. – krabinowitz Jun 30 at 19:56
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The reason a CSRF token is stored in a hidden input is so that it gets sent to the server automatically when the form is submitted. If you are manually sending a request to the server and grabbing the data yourself, you could store the CSRF anywhere. It would be best to be consistent and just store it in a hidden input.

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  • That makes sense. So it's just more convenient to do it that way. But what if you don't have a form? Let's say you only had a button and when you clicked it, it made some kind of change to the database but there wasn't necessarily any input to a form. Would it then be more appropriate to store the CSRF elsewhere? – krabinowitz Jun 30 at 19:50
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    I would still just use a hidden input and programmatically grab the value from the input, even if there isn't a whole form. If you didn't want to do that, I'd store it as a data attribute. I just wouldn't store it as a class. – zeterain Jun 30 at 19:57
  • So you're suggesting to have a hidden input element somewhere on the page regardless of whether or not it's part of a form? I didn't consider having an input exist outside of a form but there's no reason why that can't be done – krabinowitz Jun 30 at 20:13

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