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I have C++ dll that injects to target program and want to load C# script from it and for this I created a wrapper that taking functions from C++ dll and hosting clr to load C# app. I am calling CLR hosting thread like this but I need to change C# script in runtime so need to do first unload this script. How can I do this ? How can I stop CLR Hosting from other function not in thread ?

DWORD WINAPI CreateDotNetRunTime(LPVOID lpParam)
    {
        ICLRRuntimeHost* lpRuntimeHost = NULL;
        ICLRRuntimeInfo* lpRuntimeInfo = NULL;
        ICLRMetaHost* lpMetaHost = NULL;
        FILE* file;
    
        LPWSTR AppPath = new WCHAR[_MAX_PATH];
        ::GetModuleFileNameW((HINSTANCE)&__ImageBase, AppPath, _MAX_PATH);
    
        std::wstring tempPath = AppPath;
        int index = tempPath.rfind('\\');
        tempPath.erase(index, tempPath.length() - index);
        tempPath += Assembly;
    
        fopen_s(&file, Log, "a+");
    
        HRESULT hr = CLRCreateInstance(
            CLSID_CLRMetaHost, 
            IID_ICLRMetaHost, 
            (LPVOID*)&lpMetaHost
        );
    
        if (FAILED(hr))
        {
            fprintf(file, "Failed to create CLR instance.\n");
            fflush(file);
        }
    
        hr = lpMetaHost->GetRuntime(
            L"v4.0.30319", 
            IID_PPV_ARGS(&lpRuntimeInfo)
        );
    
        if (FAILED(hr))
        {
            fprintf(file, "Getting runtime failed.\n");
            fflush(file);
    
            lpMetaHost->Release();
        }
    
        BOOL fLoadable;
        hr = lpRuntimeInfo->IsLoadable(&fLoadable);
    
        if (FAILED(hr) || !fLoadable)
        {
            fprintf(file, "Runtime can't be loaded into the process.\n");
            fflush(file);
    
            lpRuntimeInfo->Release();
            lpMetaHost->Release();
        }
    
        hr = lpRuntimeInfo->GetInterface(
            CLSID_CLRRuntimeHost, 
            IID_PPV_ARGS(&lpRuntimeHost)
        );
    
        if (FAILED(hr))
        {
            fprintf(file, "Failed to acquire CLR runtime.\n");
            fflush(file);
    
            lpRuntimeInfo->Release();
            lpMetaHost->Release();
        }
    
        hr = lpRuntimeHost->Start();
    
        if (FAILED(hr))
        {
            fprintf(file, "Failed to start CLR runtime.\n");
            fflush(file);
    
            lpRuntimeHost->Release();
            lpRuntimeInfo->Release();
            lpMetaHost->Release();
        }
    
        DWORD dwRetCode = 0;
    
        hr = lpRuntimeHost->ExecuteInDefaultAppDomain(
            (LPWSTR)tempPath.c_str(), 
            Class,
            Method, 
            Param, 
            &dwRetCode
        );
    
        if (FAILED(hr))
        {
            fprintf(file, "Unable to execute assembly.\n");
            fflush(file);
    
            lpRuntimeHost->Stop();
            lpRuntimeHost->Release();
            lpRuntimeInfo->Release();
            lpMetaHost->Release();
        }
    
        fclose(file);
    
        return 0;
    }

Calling this with:

CreateThread(NULL, NULL, CreateDotNetRunTime, NULL, NULL, NULL);
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I'm not quite sure I fully understand your problem or specific environment, but nevertheless I venture an answer. YMMV.

You cannot completely unload the CLR.

From ICLRRuntimeHost::Stop documentation:

This method does not release resources to the host, unload application domains,
or destroy threads. You must terminate the process to release these resources.

To fully recycle the CLR (host), it is best to launch it in a separate (child) process and communicating with it through IPC means. You would start that process from your (injected) thread.

Besides, injecting something heavyweight and dependency- and resource-laden as the CLR into "any" other process is probably not a very good idea in the first place.

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