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In the graphics API I'm building I want to make a method that can also work as a contextmanager:

The method currently looks like this:

class Gfx:
    def __init__(self):
        self._fill = None
    
    def fill(self, color):
        self._fill = color

I can make a contextmanager that will restore state after use, like this:

class Gfx:
    def __init__(self):
        self._fill = None

    @contextmanager
    def fill(self, color):
        """Allow user to set fill color, then restore it"""
        old_fill = self._fill
        self._fill = color 
        yield
        self._fill = old_fill

But how can I make this work both ways, depending on how it's called ?

>>> gfx = Gfx()
>>> gfx.fill("red") # use as ordinary method
>>> print(self._fill)
"red"

>>> with gfx.fill("blue") # use as context manager
...     print(gfx._fill)
"blue"
>>> print(gfx._fill)
"red"
  • What do you mean by "both ways"? – Klaus D. Jul 1 at 1:59
  • @KlausD how can I make it work as a context manager if used from a with statement, but do something else when called as a method. - Source now updated to reflect this, with example. – Stuart Axon Jul 1 at 2:10
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You need to mix the approaches; have a function this is called, returning a context manager, where the context manager is ignored when not used in a with. Something along the lines of:

class Gfx:
    def __init__(self):
        self._fill = None

    @contextmanager
    def _fillctx(self, old_fill):
        try:
            yield
        finally:
            self._fill = old_fill

    def fill(self, color):
        """Allow user to set fill color, then restore it"""
        old_fill = self._fill
        self._fill = color
        return self._fillctx(old_fill)

When not invoked with with, this sets self._fill and returns a context manager that is never used. When invoked with with, it will reset self._fill when the __exit__ of that context manager is invoked.

To be clear, it's better to just use separate methods, so your "plain method" approach is more efficient, and your context manager approach can be made a little safer (actually doing the setup work in __enter__ as you're supposed to, narrowing the window for race conditions that would prevent __exit__ from being invoked).

| improve this answer | |
  • This is inefficient, and seems likely to lead to weird bugs due to setting _fill before the context manager is entered. I'd much rather just have two methods. – user2357112 supports Monica Jul 1 at 2:42
  • @user2357112supportsMonica: Setting _fill before the context manager is entered is the OP's desired feature, not a bug; context managers already have race conditions (e.g. a KeyboardInterrupt can occur while __enter__ is running, just before it exits, preventing __enter__ from finishing and __exit__ from ever being run, or firing as __exit__ is invoked, bypassing the cleanup), this just widens them a bit. But I'd agree that using two separate methods is probably the better way to go. – ShadowRanger Jul 1 at 2:51
  • I guess maybe @contextmanager the decorator is the wrong approach here, and I should probably look at making a class with __enter__ __exit__ and __call__. While two methods would make sense in many places, this is for a creative coding app where a small API is good. – Stuart Axon Jul 1 at 13:15
  • @StuartAxon: Yeah, it's a titch more work (though __enter__ can and should be implemented in terms of __call__ to avoid repeating yourself), but it's cleaner that way. Downside, it wouldn't be used the same way; you use call parens to call, but omit them when using with a with statement. – ShadowRanger Jul 1 at 13:55
  • Having poked some different approaches for this, I realised that of course, __enter__ and __exit__ should be on the thing that is returned. It's impossible to avoid the double assign, but we can choose where it goes. For now I have an external data store that allows state like fill color to be pushed / popped. Color object, stores color and and a restore color (based off the same approach in the Plotdevice project), sets it on construction, then in enter sets it back to the restore color, and pushes the new color (to avoid the cost of insertion here). Approach may change :) – Stuart Axon Jul 2 at 11:12

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