77

I'm using Postgres and cannot manage to get the last record of my table:

 my_query = client.query("SELECT timestamp,value,card from my_table");

How can I do that knowning that timestamp is a unique identifier of the record ?

13 Answers 13

130

If under "last record" you mean the record which has the latest timestamp value, then try this:

my_query = client.query("
  SELECT TIMESTAMP,
    value,
    card
  FROM my_table
  ORDER BY TIMESTAMP DESC
  LIMIT 1
");
5
  • 4
    what if you don't have a timestamp column depicting insertion time? Commented Dec 3, 2015 at 16:36
  • 13
    @WebWanderer SELECT id,value,card FROM my_table ORDER BY id DESC LIMIT 1;
    – devius
    Commented Feb 22, 2016 at 18:43
  • 2
    key thing is to use order by desc and limit 1 after that....just like shown in example queries above
    – Akki
    Commented Sep 6, 2019 at 9:33
  • If two rows had the same timestamp, would this return the last inserted row? Commented Dec 12, 2021 at 15:01
  • @user2233706, not necessarily. If the timestamps are not distinct then there are other options. For example, if there is a primary key column populated from a sequence then you can select the record that has the lates id, CURRVAL(<sequence name>)
    – bpgergo
    Commented Dec 13, 2021 at 17:17
25

you can use

SELECT timestamp, value, card 
FROM my_table 
ORDER BY timestamp DESC 
LIMIT 1

assuming you want also to sort by timestamp?

20

Easy way: ORDER BY in conjunction with LIMIT

SELECT timestamp, value, card
FROM my_table
ORDER BY timestamp DESC
LIMIT 1;

However, LIMIT is not standard and as stated by Wikipedia, The SQL standard's core functionality does not explicitly define a default sort order for Nulls.. Finally, only one row is returned when several records share the maximum timestamp.

Relational way:

The typical way of doing this is to check that no row has a higher timestamp than any row we retrieve.

SELECT timestamp, value, card
FROM my_table t1
WHERE NOT EXISTS (
  SELECT *
  FROM my_table t2
  WHERE t2.timestamp > t1.timestamp
);

It is my favorite solution, and the one I tend to use. The drawback is that our intent is not immediately clear when having a glimpse on this query.

Instructive way: MAX

To circumvent this, one can use MAX in the subquery instead of the correlation.

SELECT timestamp, value, card
FROM my_table
WHERE timestamp = (
  SELECT MAX(timestamp)
  FROM my_table
);

But without an index, two passes on the data will be necessary whereas the previous query can find the solution with only one scan. That said, we should not take performances into consideration when designing queries unless necessary, as we can expect optimizers to improve over time. However this particular kind of query is quite used.

Show off way: Windowing functions

I don't recommend doing this, but maybe you can make a good impression on your boss or something ;-)

SELECT DISTINCT
  first_value(timestamp) OVER w,
  first_value(value) OVER w,
  first_value(card) OVER w
FROM my_table
WINDOW w AS (ORDER BY timestamp DESC);

Actually this has the virtue of showing that a simple query can be expressed in a wide variety of ways (there are several others I can think of), and that picking one or the other form should be done according to several criteria such as:

  • portability (Relational/Instructive ways)
  • efficiency (Relational way)
  • expressiveness (Easy/Instructive way)
11

If your table has no Id such as integer auto-increment, and no timestamp, you can still get the last row of a table with the following query.

select * from <tablename> offset ((select count(*) from <tablename>)-1)

For example, that could allow you to search through an updated flat file, find/confirm where the previous version ended, and copy the remaining lines to your table.

1
  • If table has no rows this throws 2201X: OFFSET must not be negative
    – Andrus
    Commented Apr 26, 2022 at 9:58
8

The last inserted record can be queried using this assuming you have the "id" as the primary key:

SELECT timestamp,value,card FROM my_table WHERE id=(select max(id) from my_table)

Assuming every new row inserted will use the highest integer value for the table's id.

7

If you accept a tip, create an id in this table like serial. The default of this field will be:

nextval('table_name_field_seq'::regclass).

So, you use a query to call the last register. Using your example:

pg_query($connection, "SELECT currval('table_name_field_seq') AS id;

I hope this tip helps you.

3
  • Sorry due my bad english.
    – phsaires
    Commented Jun 30, 2015 at 13:52
  • 1
    if the last row gets eventually deleted, this would still return its id... not a safe tip :)
    – ALTN
    Commented Oct 27, 2017 at 17:42
  • 2
    Return the value most recently obtained by nextval for this sequence in the current session. So this will not only return error if nextval wasn't called in current session, but you will also not see changes done in other sessions. Commented Aug 27, 2018 at 12:05
6

To get the last row,

Get Last row in the sorted order: In case the table has a column specifying time/primary key,

  1. Using LIMIT clause

SELECT * FROM USERS ORDER BY CREATED_TIME DESC LIMIT 1;

  1. Using FETCH clause - Reference

SELECT * FROM USERS ORDER BY CREATED_TIME FETCH FIRST ROW ONLY;

Get Last row in the rows insertion order: In case the table has no columns specifying time/any unique identifiers

  1. Using CTID system column, where ctid represents the physical location of the row in a table - Reference

    SELECT * FROM USERS WHERE CTID = (SELECT MAX(CTID) FROM USERS);

Consider the following table,

userid |username |    createdtime |
     1 |       A |  1535012279455 |
     2 |       B |  1535042279423 | //as per created time, this is the last row
     3 |       C |  1535012279443 |
     4 |       D |  1535012212311 |
     5 |       E |  1535012254634 | //as per insertion order, this is the last row

The query 1 and 2 returns,

userid |username |    createdtime |
     2 |       B |  1535042279423 |

while 3 returns,

userid |username |    createdtime |
     5 |       E |  1535012254634 |

Note : On updating an old row, it removes the old row and updates the data and inserts as a new row in the table. So using the following query returns the tuple on which the data modification is done at the latest.

Now updating a row, using

UPDATE USERS SET USERNAME = 'Z' WHERE USERID='3'

the table becomes as,

userid |username |    createdtime |
     1 |       A |  1535012279455 |
     2 |       B |  1535042279423 |
     4 |       D |  1535012212311 |
     5 |       E |  1535012254634 |
     3 |       Z |  1535012279443 |

Now the query 3 returns,

userid |username |    createdtime |
     3 |       Z |  1535012279443 |
4

Use the following

SELECT timestamp, value, card 
FROM my_table 
ORDER BY timestamp DESC 
LIMIT 1
0
1

These are all good answers but if you want an aggregate function to do this to grab the last row in the result set generated by an arbitrary query, there's a standard way to do this (taken from the Postgres wiki, but should work in anything conforming reasonably to the SQL standard as of a decade or more ago):

-- Create a function that always returns the last non-NULL item
CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION public.last_agg ( anyelement, anyelement )
RETURNS anyelement LANGUAGE SQL IMMUTABLE STRICT AS $$
        SELECT $2;
$$;

-- And then wrap an aggregate around it
CREATE AGGREGATE public.LAST (
        sfunc    = public.last_agg,
        basetype = anyelement,
        stype    = anyelement
);

It's usually preferable to do select ... limit 1 if you have a reasonable ordering, but this is useful if you need to do this within an aggregate and would prefer to avoid a subquery.

See also this question for a case where this is the natural answer.

1

For Last Record, you can use id as below

SELECT * FROM table_name ORDER BY id DESC LIMIT 1

-1

The column name plays an important role in the descending order:

select <COLUMN_NAME1, COLUMN_NAME2> from >TABLENAME> ORDER BY <COLUMN_NAME THAT MENTIONS TIME> DESC LIMIT 1;

For example: The below-mentioned table(user_details) consists of the column name 'created_at' that has timestamp for the table.

SELECT userid, username FROM user_details ORDER BY created_at DESC LIMIT 1;
-2

select * from table_name LIMIT 1;

1
  • 4
    this only return one row. Not the last record.
    – sukalogika
    Commented Dec 31, 2021 at 6:16
-3

In Oracle SQL,

select * from (select row_number() over (order by rowid desc) rn, emp.* from emp) where rn=1;
2
  • 2
    Please add an explanation to your answer
    – juliushuck
    Commented Nov 12, 2020 at 7:30
  • 4
    The question is explicitely about Postgres.
    – bfontaine
    Commented Oct 10, 2022 at 17:10

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