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I would like to know about the most efficient way to set a value to an abstract private field from a subclass. So, for example, have a field called itemCost, then I would like to initialize its value to 200 in the subclass.

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  • you could have an abstract protected void setItemCost(int itemCost) method in the parent abstract class that sets the field? Jul 1, 2020 at 22:24
  • right, but as far as keeping it private
    – Joel Gefen
    Jul 1, 2020 at 23:10
  • Hi, does any answer fit your needs? If so, do you mind accepting the "answer"? This will help us and future visitors (see meta.stackexchange.com/questions/5234/…). If not, please let us know what's missing. Thank you.
    – bsaverino
    Jul 13, 2020 at 21:39
  • where do you accept an answer
    – Joel Gefen
    Jul 15, 2020 at 21:31
  • Right in my previous comment, but yet you did it. Thank you. This helps raising trust.
    – bsaverino
    Jul 16, 2020 at 15:44

1 Answer 1

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There is no such abstract private field in Java. Only classes and methods can be abstract. But to emulate an abstract field, I believe there are at least two good methods:

  • Method (1): Define an uninitialized final field in the superclass. And initialize it in the child class. This is more suitable to constant (primitive) variables and having the variable initialized in the constructor is perfectly fine. It will also work well with complex types of course (class instances with mutable content, instead of primitive types).
  • Method (2): Define an abstract setter for the field to force the subclass to implement/redefine this method and do the specific initializations. This is more suitable for varying field content but there is no guarantee that the field will be correctly initialized by all subclasses. This becomes implementation-dependent.

Method (1)

abstract class MySuperClass {
    final int itemCost;
    
    protected MySuperClass(int _itemCost) {
        this.itemCost = _itemCost;
    }
}

class MySubClass extends MySuperClass {
    public MySubClass() {
        super(200);
    }
    
    public MySubClass(int itemCost) {
        super(itemCost);
    }
}

If you do not call super(itemCost) you will get a compiler error. So this is very enforcing.

Method (2)

abstract class MySuperClass {
    int itemCost;
    
    protected MySuperClass() { }
    
    abstract void setItemCost();
    abstract void setItemCost(int _itemCost);
}

class MySubClass extends MySuperClass {
    public MySubClass() {
        setItemCost();
    }
    
    public MySubClass(int itemCost) { 
        setItemCost(itemCost);
    }

    @Override
    final void setItemCost() {
        this.itemCost = 200;
    }
    
    @Override
    final void setItemCost(int _itemCost) {
        this.itemCost = _itemCost;
    }        
}

If you are interested in modifying the value after instantiation and if the child class is correctly implemented, then it is a fine solution. But it is a more verbose, less intuitive and error-prone solution.

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