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If I want to redirect execution to another function in assembly, I can do something like this:

push 0deadbeefh ; function pointer to some random function
ret

But lets say, in C

void* func_ptr = (void*) 0xdeadbeef;

Assuming I have the above variable storing a function pointer to a random function in the code. If I don't know which parameters the end function takes, is it possible to jmp to this function using only its function pointer?

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    jmp doesn't know or care about parameters, it will happily do its thing but you might not like the result. What sort of context is it being done in? For example for forwarding a call, the parameters are already set up correctly. Btw don't use that push/ret trick, it's bad for performance and may fail in the future if Control Flow Enforcement is enabled – harold Jul 2 at 21:08
  • In my scenario, I am doing this for hot patching. I am adding a safeguard code (function) before few API calls and trying to redirect back to the original function/API after my code finishes. – user12882377 Jul 5 at 18:29
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As soon as you start doing anything like this, you quickly get into undefined dangerous things that might not always work, and may be architecture-dependant. However, ignoring that, you may be able to do the following:

void (*func_ptr)() = (void (*)()) 0xdeadbeef;
func_ptr();

Here, func_ptr is defined as a pointer to a function taking unspecified arguments, and returning void. It's called as any other function pointer (or function) is.

This code compiles for x86-64 GCC 10.1 and Clang 10.0.0 with -Wall -Wextra -Werror -pedantic. Both compilers generate a single jmp. They can do this because it's a tail call from a function returning void.

| improve this answer | |
  • What if I was able to count the sizeof all parameters which are to be passed to the function? How would I use this function pointer to at least add some padding to the prototyped function so that it could safely call the resultant function? Or does this not matter since all its parameters are already pushed onto the stack? – user12882377 Jul 5 at 18:34
  • @randomuser843 What do you mean? – Thomas Jager Jul 5 at 18:59

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