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I need to use 64-bit dlls in 32-bit application.

First, I created a separate 64-bit executable and used Microsoft RPC to call 64-bit code from 32-bit application (originally binaries were native, but it doesn't matter here - we can always write .NET wrappers). Everything worked, but I didn't really like all this boilerplate code I need to write in order to launch RPC server, connect to it, run executable (and watch over it). I know that out-of-process COM can handle a lot of such work by hosting a dll in a dllhost.exe process invisibly for a client.

So I did as described here: create 64-bit server, 32-bit client, then register the server using regasm, change a couple of registry entries and everything works. But I can't use regasm on clients' machines, so I tried registration-free COM as described in the MSDN article. Everything worked without registration until server and client were both 32-bit. But when I rebuild server as a 64-bit binary, I obtain the following error:

Unhandled Exception: System.IO.FileLoadException: Retrieving the COM class factory for component with CLSID {D698BA94-AEFF-3D4F-9D11-BC6DE81D330B} failed due to the following error: 80131047 The given assembly name or codebase was invalid. (Exception from HRESULT: 0x80131047).

Can I have the best from the two methods: have registration-free COM Interop, but between 64-bit and 32-bit code?

UPDATE

Added source code. Here, if I remove processorArchitecture="amd64" from manifests and build server as x86 binary, everything works.

Client code

using System;
using System.Reflection;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

namespace ConsoleApp5
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Type ComType = Type.GetTypeFromCLSID(new Guid("D698BA94-AEFF-3D4F-9D11-BC6DE81D330B"));

            var ComObject = Activator.CreateInstance(ComType);

            ComType.InvokeMember("TestMe", BindingFlags.InvokeMethod, null, ComObject, null);

            if (Marshal.IsComObject(ComObject))
                Marshal.ReleaseComObject(ComObject);
        }
    }
}

Client app manifest

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<assembly manifestVersion="1.0" xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1">
  <assemblyIdentity version="1.0.0.0" name="ConsoleApp5" type="win32"/>
  <dependency>
    <dependentAssembly>
      <assemblyIdentity
          name="ClassLibrary1"
          version="1.0.0.0"
          processorArchitecture="amd64"
        />
    </dependentAssembly>
  </dependency>
</assembly>

Server code

using System;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace ClassLibrary1
{
    [ComVisible(true)]
    [Guid("D698BA94-AEFF-3D4F-9D11-BC6DE81D330B")]
    public class ComServer
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Default constructor - necessary for using with COM
        /// </summary>
        public ComServer() { }

        /// <summary>
        /// Test method to be called by COM sonsumer
        /// </summary>
        public void TestMe()
        {
            MessageBox.Show("Hello from the 64-bit world!");
        }
    }
}

Server app manifest

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<assembly manifestVersion="1.0" xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1">
  <assemblyIdentity version="1.0.0.0" name="ClassLibrary1" processorArchitecture="amd64"/>
  <file name="ClassLibrary.dll"/>
  <clrClass
        clsid="{D698BA94-AEFF-3D4F-9D11-BC6DE81D330B}"
        progid="ClassLibrary1.ComServer"
        threadingModel="Both"
        name="ClassLibrary1.ComServer"
        runtimeVersion="v4.0.30319">
  </clrClass>
</assembly>
  • Don't see why it couldn't work. Do you have a reproducing project? – Simon Mourier Jul 3 at 6:42
  • @SimonMourier updated question with the source code – undermind Jul 3 at 7:14
  • Ok, I see what you mean now. Well, for this to work, a surrogate is mandatory, and it has to be registered. And it needs the component to be itself registered. Note you can register COM component in HKCU if admin rights are your registration issue. stackoverflow.com/a/35789844/403671 – Simon Mourier Jul 3 at 9:23

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