21

So I have a Map in Scala like this:

val m = Map[String, String](
    "a" -> "theA",
    "b" -> "theB",
    "c" -> "theC",
    "d" -> "theD",
    "e" -> "theE"
)

and I want to serialize this structure into a JSON string using lift-json.

Do any of you know how to do this?

26

How about this?

implicit val formats = net.liftweb.json.DefaultFormats
import net.liftweb.json.JsonAST._
import net.liftweb.json.Extraction._
import net.liftweb.json.Printer._
val m = Map[String, String](
    "a" -> "theA",
    "b" -> "theB",
    "c" -> "theC",
    "d" -> "theD",
    "e" -> "theE"
)
println(compact(render(decompose(m))))

output:

{"e":"theE","a":"theA","b":"theB","c":"theC","d":"theD"}

EDIT:

For a scala.collections.mutable.Map, you should convert it first to an immutable map: .toMap

  • 6
    When I change the type to scala.collections.mutable.Map, the output becomes: [{"_1":"d","_2":"theD"},{"_1":"a","_2":"theA"},{"_1":"c","_2":"theC"},{"_1":"b","_2":"theB"},{"_1":"e","_2":"theE"}], which makes me kind of sad. – Jay Taylor Jun 21 '11 at 20:02
  • 4
    There is an easy workaround for this -- just call .toMap on the mutable map to get an immutable map, and then things work okay again. – Jay Taylor Jun 21 '11 at 20:08
  • 1
    But what if you want to preserve the order of elements in the map? Basically, how to json-serialize a LinkedHashMap? Calling toMap may modify the order of entries. – teo Dec 2 '13 at 10:46
  • 1
    @teo Isn't that kind of beyond the scope of what JSON supports? That seems like a job for an array. – Casey Mar 14 '17 at 15:07
32

If you are using the latest Scala 2.10.x and above :

println(scala.util.parsing.json.JSONObject(m))
  • 3
    It's been removed from Scala 2.11 and above. – Soid Sep 6 '16 at 22:10
  • 2
    @Soid looks like it's still there : scala-lang.org/api/2.11.8/scala-parser-combinators/… – nevets1219 Sep 15 '16 at 20:22
  • I might make a mistake somewhere. But were you able to use it? What version of scala-parser-combinators did you use (a full maven dependency would be helpful)? – Soid Sep 17 '16 at 6:05
  • 10
    It looks like it doesn't recurse correctly into the object. For example, Map("0" -> 1, "1" -> List(Map("2" -> 3))) is stringified to {"0" : 1, "1" : List(Map(2 -> 3))}. – Noel Yap Sep 30 '16 at 17:26
  • Beware, it does not recurse, and will translate nested objects to their string representation! – seb Aug 1 at 14:27
6

You can roll your own pretty easily (yay, no dependencies). This one does basic handling of types and will do recursion unlike JSONObject that was mentioned:

import scala.collection.mutable.ListBuffer

object JsonConverter {
  def toJson(o: Any) : String = {
    var json = new ListBuffer[String]()
    o match {
      case m: Map[_,_] => {
        for ( (k,v) <- m ) {
          var key = escape(k.asInstanceOf[String])
          v match {
            case a: Map[_,_] => json += "\"" + key + "\":" + toJson(a)
            case a: List[_] => json += "\"" + key + "\":" + toJson(a)
            case a: Int => json += "\"" + key + "\":" + a
            case a: Boolean => json += "\"" + key + "\":" + a
            case a: String => json += "\"" + key + "\":\"" + escape(a) + "\""
            case _ => ;
          }
        }
      }
      case m: List[_] => {
        var list = new ListBuffer[String]()
        for ( el <- m ) {
          el match {
            case a: Map[_,_] => list += toJson(a)
            case a: List[_] => list += toJson(a)
            case a: Int => list += a.toString()
            case a: Boolean => list += a.toString()
            case a: String => list += "\"" + escape(a) + "\""
            case _ => ;
          }
        }
        return "[" + list.mkString(",") + "]"
      }
      case _ => ;
    }
    return "{" + json.mkString(",") + "}"
  }

  private def escape(s: String) : String = {
    return s.replaceAll("\"" , "\\\\\"");
  }
}

You can see it in action like

println(JsonConverter.toJson(
    Map("a"-> 1,
        "b" -> Map(
            "nes\"ted" -> "yeah{\"some\":true"),
            "c" -> List(
                1,
                2,
                "3",
                List(
                    true,
                    false,
                    true,
                    Map(
                        "1"->"two",
                        "3"->"four"
                    )
                )
            )
        )
    )
)

{"a":1,"b":{"nes\"ted":"yeah{\"some\":true"},"c":[1,2,"3",[true,false,true,{"1":"two","3":"four"}]]}

(It's part of a Coinbase GDAX library I've written, see util.scala)

3

You can use this simple way if you are using play framework:

import play.api.libs.json._

Json.toJson(<your_map>)
1

This code will convert many different objects, and doesn't require any libraries beyond the built-in the scala.util.parsing.json._. It won't properly handle edge cases like Maps with integers as keys.

import scala.util.parsing.json.{JSONArray, JSONObject}
def toJson(arr: List[Any]): JSONArray = {
  JSONArray(arr.map {
    case (innerMap: Map[String, Any]) => toJson(innerMap)
    case (innerArray: List[Any])      => toJson(innerArray)
    case (other)                      => other
  })
}
def toJson(map: Map[String, Any]): JSONObject = {
  JSONObject(map.map {
    case (key, innerMap: Map[String, Any]) =>
      (key, toJson(innerMap))
    case (key, innerArray: List[Any]) =>
      (key, toJson(innerArray))
    case (key, other) =>
      (key, other)
  })
}
0

Similar to Einar's solution, you can use JSONObject from Parser Combinators to do this. Note that it does not recurse, you'll need to do this yourself. The library also includes JSONArray, for list like data structures. Something like the following will address Noel's concerns about nested structures. This example does not recurse to an arbitrary level, but will handle a value of List[Map[String, Any]].

import scala.util.parsing.json.{JSONArray, JSONObject}

def toJson(m : Map[String, Any]): String = JSONObject(
  m.mapValues {
    case mp: Map[String, Any] => JSONObject(mp)
    case lm: List[Map[String, Any]] => JSONArray(lm.map(JSONObject(_)))
    case x => x
    }
  ).toString
0

Supplementing the answer by @Raja.

For those nested object, I locally modify the class to have my wanted toString() like this way:

case class MList[T]() extends MutableList[T] { override def toString() = "[" + this.toList.mkString(",") + "]" }

Then inside the Map object, I use this MList instead of the standard List. That way, my map object prints out fine by calling JSONObject(map).toString().

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