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Need get the delimiters at the starting of each line, below are sample input and output files for reference. In actual Delimiter used are( £{, ^$^) Note - The file to be rearranged has huge data

Have tried the below but it does not work:

tr £{ \\n
sed 's/£{/\n/g' 
awk '{ gsub("£{", "\n") } 1'
         

Input File:

 £{firstlinecontinues£{secondstartsfromhereandit
  keepsoncontinueingtillend£{herecomes3rdand£{fi
  nallyfourthisalsohere

Output File:

£{firstlinecontinues
£{secondstartsfromhereanditkeepsoncontinueingtillend
£{herecomes3rdand
£{finallyfourthisalsohere
  • Does this duplicate your question? Rearrange special character using AWK command or ksh script – user13859939 Jul 3 at 14:04
  • not completely but partially yes, I am still looking for solution. – Linnea Jul 3 at 14:06
  • These strange delimiters might be an indication of another underlying problem. Does this work for you? echo "£{1£{2£{3" | sed 's/£{/\n&/g' If so, you may have an issue with your data file. – karakfa Jul 3 at 17:22
  • nope this too does not work, the file generated is without any change, the below command partially works for me but I am unable to print the delimiter at starting of each line awk '{ gsub("\£{", "\n") } 1' – Linnea Jul 3 at 17:27
  • There is no file here, just a pair of commands to create (if successful) three lines from the given input which is part of it. – karakfa Jul 3 at 17:31
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With GNU awk for multi-char RS and \s:

$ awk -v RS='£{' 'NR>1{gsub(/\s/,""); print RS $0}' file
£{firstlinecontinues
£{secondstartsfromhereanditkeepsoncontinueingtillend
£{herecomes3rdand
£{finallyfourthisalsohere
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  • Glad for your response, I tried running the command but ended up with no output and the file remains unchanged, there is no error though – Linnea Jul 3 at 14:24
  • Can anyone please give a response, I am badly stuck due to this – Linnea Jul 3 at 15:44
  • The command isn't intended to modify the file, it will produce output as you can see it does in my answer. If it's producing no output then either a) your real input doesn't look like the sample in your question (specifically you have no lines that contain £{) or, b) you copy/pasted my script incorrectly. – Ed Morton Jul 4 at 11:29
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awk 'BEGIN{RS="(£{\|\^\$\^)"; OFS=ORS=""}{$1=$1;print $0 (FNR>1?"\n":"") RT}' file
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  • thanks for this but It does not shifts the delimiters to the next line as showed in the output file – Linnea Jul 3 at 16:06
  • It actually compresses the file instead of creating new line Starting with the delimiter – Linnea Jul 3 at 16:29
  • This works in my environment ; GNU Awk 4.1.4 and Bash = 4.4.12(1)-release – shellter Jul 7 at 18:03
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Since the £ symbol is represented by two Octal codes, 302 and 243, I was able to produce the desired result with this perl command:

perl -pe 's/(\302\243)/\n$1/g' data.txt

NOTE: Here's what I see on my system:

echo "£" | od -c
0000000 302 243  \n
0000003
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