1

Assume I have a struct

struct 
foo{
char *p1;
char *p2;
char *p3;
}foo;

and I have assigned the struct malloc - allocated string line that

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

char temp[] = "this is string"
char *allocated_temp = malloc(sizeof(temp));
strcpy(allocated_temp, temp);

struct foo bar; 
bar.p1 = strtok(allocated_temp, " ");
bar.p2 = strtok(NULL, " ");
bar.p3 = strtok(NULL, " ");

I want to free p1 without freeing the other memory that is pointed to by p2 and p3. using realloc will not work as p3 will be freed first, and I am searching for a more of a elegant solution than using coping the struct to a new one without the first part or reallocating the other two strings to a different address.

What good solutions does this problem have?

(to clarify, when I am saying I want to free p1 i mean the "this\0" part of the string.

  • 1
    This looks like an XY-problem. Why do you want to free part of an array? – klutt Jul 4 at 10:16
  • @klutt Yes, I want to free the first part of the memory block (the part before the first null terminator). What is a XY-problem? – avivgood2 Jul 4 at 10:18
  • XY-problem: meta.stackexchange.com/q/66377/374458 – klutt Jul 4 at 10:20
  • 1
    So when you want to ignore it, why not just use p2? – klutt Jul 4 at 10:24
  • 1
    Your use of strtok() is incorrect. bar.p1 = strtok(allocated_temp, " "); is fine for the first line, but your later lines bar.p2 = strtok(allocated_temp, NULL); are wrong. They should be bar.p2 = strtok(NULL, " "); The string being parsed is replaced by NULL, not the separator string. – Andrew Henle Jul 4 at 10:50
1

There is no solution to your problem with standard tools (malloc, etc). You can only free the end of the memory that was allocated by realloc()-ing with a smaller size.

If you want to free p1 this way, you must first move your data to the beginning of the allocated block, update your pointers (p2 and p3) and then call realloc().

The best way is probably to change your program in order to malloc p1, p2 and p3 separately.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    If you want to free p1 this way, you must first move your data to the beginning of the allocated block, update your pointers (p2 and p3) and then call realloc(). Even that's probably not worth the overhead given short input strings. The call to realloc() is likely to do nothing since most heap implementations allocate memory in blocks no smaller than 8, 16, or even 32 bytes because of alignment requirements. The bigger problem is having to keep track of the original pointer so it can be freed later – Andrew Henle Jul 4 at 10:53
  • @AndrewHenle Agreed, hence my last paragraph. I'm just providing an algorithmically correct solution if the OP is in dire need to free p1. – xhienne Jul 4 at 11:06

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