0

These are the lists I have written in my code:

book_codes = [1 , 2 , 3 , 10] 
book_names = ["Harry Potter" , "Game of Thrones" , "Star Wars" , "War of the Worlds"] 
book_categories = ["Fantasy" , "Fantasy" , "Science-fiction" , "Science-fiction"]

I am trying to create a function where the user types the code of a book into the function below, and then the function reads out information related to that book code. This is all I've come up with so far:

book_code = int(input("Please enter book code: "))
index = book_codes.index(book_code)

For example, if the user types '2' into the function, the function should print something along the lines of:

Code: 2 - Title: Game of Thrones - Category: Fantasy

| |
  • 2
    Have you considered using dictionary in Python? – Deepak Kamat Jul 5 at 13:26
  • You can create a class to group data together. Otherwise use print(book_name[index],book_categories[index]) – lil_noob Jul 5 at 13:32
  • Please don't create a class. The dictionary suggestion is a good lead. – Reut Sharabani Jul 5 at 13:34
  • 1
    There wouldn't necessarily be anything wrong with defining a class here (the dataclasses module makes such a class easy to define), though a namedtuple might be sufficient. – chepner Jul 5 at 13:38
  • Do not vandalize your posts. By posting on this site, you've irrevocably granted the Stack Exchange network the right to distribute that content under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license for as long as it sees fit. For alternatives to deletion, see: I've thought better of my question; can I delete it? – Cody Gray Jul 8 at 6:52
2

Use a dataclass and a dict.

from dataclasses import dataclass


@dataclass
class Book:
    id: int  # Not clear if this is necessary
    name: str
    category: str


book_codes = [1 , 2 , 3 , 10] 
book_names = ["Harry Potter" , "Game of Thrones" , "Star Wars" , "War of the Worlds"] 
book_categories = ["Fantasy" , "Fantasy" , "Science-fiction" , "Science-fiction"]

books = {id: Book(id, name, category) for id, name, category in zip(book_codes, book_names, book_categories)}


book_code = int(input("Please enter book code: "))
book = books[book_code]
| |
  • I know higher-order functions are frowned upon by Guido but I can’t help but feel that map would alleviate some of the redundancy of this code and make it cleaner: books = {b.id: b for b in map(Book, book_codes, book_names, book_categories)}. – Konrad Rudolph Jul 5 at 13:55
0

better to store information in dictionary than in list format

book_codes = [1 , 2 , 3 , 10] 
book_names = ["Harry Potter" , "Game of Thrones" , "Star Wars" , "War of the Worlds"] 
book_categories = ["Fantasy" , "Fantasy" , "Science-fiction" , "Science-fiction"]


dataset = { code: {'book_name':book_names[index],'book_category':book_categories[index]} for index, code in enumerate(book_codes)}


"""
dataset 

    {1: {'book_name': 'Harry Potter', 'book_category': 'Fantasy'},
 2: {'book_name': 'Game of Thrones', 'book_category': 'Fantasy'},
 3: {'book_name': 'Star Wars', 'book_category': 'Science-fiction'},
 10: {'book_name': 'War of the Worlds', 'book_category': 'Science-fiction'}}

"""

input_code = int(input("enter book input code : " ))

if input_code in dataset:
    for k, v in dataset[input_code].items():
        print("{} = {}".format(k, v))
else:
    print("invalid input code")
| |
0

Instead of using 3 lists use 1 dictionary by code:

You can generate it by hand or use this line:

books_by_code = {code: {"name": name, "category": category} for code, name, category in zip(book_codes, book_names, book_categories)}

And now you can find a book by its code easily using this dictionary:

{1: {'category': 'Fantasy', 'name': 'Harry Potter'},
 2: {'category': 'Fantasy', 'name': 'Game of Thrones'},
 3: {'category': 'Science-fiction', 'name': 'Star Wars'},
 10: {'category': 'Science-fiction', 'name': 'War of the Worlds'}}

To find the category of a book with code = 2:

books_by_code[2]["category"] # Fantasy

To print information in your format:

>>> code = 2 # change to user input
>>> category = books_by_code[code]["category"]
>>> name = books_by_code[code]["name"] # should probably be "title"
>>> print("Code: {} - Title: {} - Category: {}".format(code, name, category))
Code: 2 - Title: Game of Thrones - Category: Fantasy
| |
0

Assuming that you will have unique book code, It can be solved using,

  • Zip
  • Filter
  • Lambda
  • List

List : The list() constructor take in a iterable and returns a list consisting of iterable's items.

Zip : The zip() function returns an iterator of tuples based on the iterable objects.

list1 = [1, 2, 3]
list2 = ['one', 'two', 'three']

print (list(zip(list1, list2)))

# Output : [(1, 'one'), (2, 'two'), (3, 'three')]

Lambda : A lambda function is a small anonymous function.

x = lambda a : a + 10
print(x(5))

# Output : 15

Filter: The filter() method filters the given sequence with the help of a function that tests each element in the sequence to be true or not.

seq = [0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13] 
  
# result contains even numbers of the list 
result = filter(lambda x: x % 2 == 0, seq) 
print(list(result)) 

# Output : [0, 2, 8]

Coming to you problem the solution would be,

book_codes = [1 , 2 , 3 , 10] 
book_names = ["Harry Potter" , "Game of Thrones" , "Star Wars" , "War of the Worlds"] 
book_categories = ["Fantasy" , "Fantasy" , "Science-fiction" , "Science-fiction"]

book_code = int(input("Please enter book code: "))
result = list(filter(lambda x  : x[0] == book_code ,zip(book_codes,book_names,book_categories)))[0]

print ("Code: {} - Title: {} - Category: {}".format(result[0], result[1], result[2]))

# Output : Code: 2 - Title: Game of Thrones - Category: Fantasy

Hope this was helpful.

| |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.