2

I want to create a function myfun that can only be used inside another function, in my case dplyrs mutate or summarise. I further do not want to rely on dplyrs internals (for example mask$...).

I came up with a quick and dirty workaround: A function search_calling_fn that checks all function names in the call stack and looks for a specific pattern in the calling functions.

search_calling_fn <- function(pattern) {
  
  call_st <- lapply(sys.calls(), `[[`, 1)
  
  res <- any(unlist(lapply(call_st, function(x) grepl(pattern, x, perl = TRUE))))
  
  if (!res) {
    stop("`myfun()` must only be used inside dplyr::mutate or dplyr::summarise")
  } else {
    return()
  }
}

This works as expected as the two examples below show (dplyr = 1.0.0)

library(dplyr)

myfun <- function() {
  search_calling_fn("^mutate|^summarise")
  NULL
}

# throws as expected no error
mtcars %>% 
  mutate(myfun())


myfun2 <- function() {
  search_calling_fn("^select")
  NULL
}

# throws as expected an error
mtcars %>% 
  mutate(myfun2())

This approach has one loophole: myfun could be called from a function with a similar name which is not a dplyr function. I wonder how I can check from which namespace a function on my call stack is coming. rlang has a function call_ns but this will only work, if the function is explicitly called with package::.... Further, when using mutate there is mutate_cols an internal function and mutate.data.frame an S3 method on the call stack - both seem to make getting the namespace even more complicated.

On a second thought I wonder whether there is a better, more official approach to achieve the same outcome: only allow myfun to be called within dplyrs mutate or summarise.

The approach should work no matter how the function is called:

  1. mutate
  2. dplyr::mutate

Additional note

After discussing @r2evans answer, I realize that a solution should pass the following test:

library(dplyr)

myfun <- function() {
  search_calling_fn("^mutate|^summarise")
  NULL
}

# an example for a function masking dplyr's mutate
mutate <- function(df, x) {
  NULL
}

# should throw an error but doesn't
mtcars %>% 
  mutate(myfun())

So the checking function should not only look at the callstack, but also try to see which package a function on the callstack is coming from. Interestingly, RStudios debugger shows the namespace for each function on the callstack, even for internal functions. I wonder how it does this, since environment(fun)) is only working on exported functions.

  • Nitpick: you're missing a close } at the end of function search_calling_fn. – Rui Barradas Jul 5 '20 at 21:46
  • Thanks for spotting that! I corrected it. – TimTeaFan Jul 5 '20 at 21:47
  • 2
    Related: 1 and 2. – Rui Barradas Jul 5 '20 at 22:06
  • Your sample mutate code will never fail, because x is lazy; since it is never used, it is never "realized", so myfun is never called. ... but I get your point, getAnywhere in my answer is a little too eager. – r2evans Jul 8 '20 at 15:58
2

Update: I'm going to "borrow" from rlang::trace_back, since it seems to have an elegant (and working) method for determining a full package::function for most of the call tree (some like %>% are not always fully-resolved).

(If you're trying to reduce package bloat ... while it's unlikely you'd have dplyr and not purrr available, if you would prefer to do as much in base as possible, I've provided #==# equivalent base-R calls. It's certainly feasible to try to remove some of the rlang calls, but again ... if you're assuming dplyr, then you definitely have rlang around, in which case this should not be a problem.)

search_calling_pkg <- function(pkgs, funcs) {
  # <borrowed from="rlang::trace_back">
  frames <- sys.frames()
  idx <- rlang:::trace_find_bottom(NULL, frames)
  frames <- frames[idx]
  parents <- sys.parents()[idx]
  calls <- as.list(sys.calls()[idx])
  calls <- purrr::map(calls, rlang:::call_fix_car)
  #==# calls <- lapply(calls, rlang:::call_fix_car)
  calls <- rlang:::add_pipe_pointer(calls, frames)
  calls <- purrr::map2(calls, seq_along(calls), rlang:::maybe_add_namespace)
  #==# calls <- Map(rlang:::maybe_add_namespace, calls, seq_along(calls))
  # </borrowed>
  calls_chr <- vapply(calls, function(cl) as.character(cl)[1], character(1))
  ptn <- paste0("^(", paste(pkgs, collapse = "|"), ")::")
  pkgres <- any(grepl(ptn, calls_chr))
  funcres <- !missing(funcs) && any(mapply(grepl, paste0("^", funcs, "$"), list(calls_chr)))
  if (!pkgres || !funcres) {
    stop("not correct")
  } else return()
}

The intention is that you can look for particular packages and/or particular functions. The funcs= argument can be fixed strings (taken as verbatim), but since I thought you might want to match against any of the mutate* functions (etc), you can also make it a regex. All functions need to be full package::funcname, not just funcname (though you could certainly make it a regex :-).

myfun1 <- function() {
  search_calling_pkg(pkgs = "dplyr")
  NULL
}
myfun2 <- function() {
  search_calling_pkg(funcs = c("dplyr::mutate.*", "dplyr::summarize.*"))
  NULL
}
mutate <- function(df, x) { force(x); NULL; }
mtcars[1:2,] %>% mutate(myfun1())
# Error: not correct

mtcars[1:2,] %>% dplyr::mutate(myfun1())
#   mpg cyl disp  hp drat    wt  qsec vs am gear carb
# 1  21   6  160 110  3.9 2.620 16.46  0  1    4    4
# 2  21   6  160 110  3.9 2.875 17.02  0  1    4    4

mtcars[1:2,] %>% mutate(myfun2())
# Error: not correct

mtcars[1:2,] %>% dplyr::mutate(myfun2())
#   mpg cyl disp  hp drat    wt  qsec vs am gear carb
# 1  21   6  160 110  3.9 2.620 16.46  0  1    4    4
# 2  21   6  160 110  3.9 2.875 17.02  0  1    4    4

And performance seems to be significantly better than the first answer, though still not a "zero hit" on performance:

microbenchmark::microbenchmark(
  a = mtcars %>%
  dplyr::mutate(),
  b = mtcars %>%
  dplyr::mutate(myfun1())
)
# Unit: milliseconds
#  expr    min     lq     mean  median      uq     max neval
#     a 1.5965 1.7444 1.883837 1.82955 1.91655  3.0574   100
#     b 3.4748 3.7335 4.187005 3.92580 4.18140 19.4343   100

(This portion kept for prosperity, though note that getAnywhere will find dplyr::mutate even if the above non-dplyr mutate is defined and called.)

Seeded by Rui's links, I suggest that looking for specific functions might very well miss new functions and/or otherwise-valid but differently-named functions. (I don't have a clear example.) From here, consider looking for particular packages instead of particular functions.

search_calling_pkg <- function(pkgs) {
  call_st <- lapply(sys.calls(), `[[`, 1)
  res <- any(vapply(call_st, function(ca) any(pkgs %in% tryCatch(getAnywhere(as.character(ca)[1])$where, error=function(e) "")), logical(1)))
  if (!res) {
    stop("not called from packages")
  } else return()
}
myfun <- function() {
  search_calling_pkg("package:dplyr")
  NULL
}

Realize that this is not an inexpensive operation. I believe the majority of time spent in this is dealing with the calling tree, perhaps not something we can easily remedy.

microbenchmark::microbenchmark(
  a = mtcars %>% mutate(),
  b = mtcars %>% mutate(myfun())
)
# Unit: milliseconds
#  expr        min         lq       mean     median        uq        max neval
#     a   1.872101   2.165801   2.531046   2.312051   2.72835   4.861202   100
#     b 546.916301 571.909551 603.528225 589.995251 612.20240 798.707300   100

If you believe it will be called infrequently and your function takes "a little time", then perhaps the half-second delay won't be that noticeable, but with this toy example the difference is palpable.

  • Thanks! You're right, in general we shouldn't check for function names and only rely on checking the origin of a function. For my dplyr case I came up with two alternatives (see below). – TimTeaFan Jul 6 '20 at 14:33
  • Although I like the approach, I just realized that it is not actually checking the package of the function on the call stack. It just searchs for the function name in all loaded namesspaces. So if dplyr is loaded, but the mutate function is masked by another function, calling myfun() inside the non-dplyr mutate will not throw an error. – TimTeaFan Jul 6 '20 at 22:32
  • I disagree with your assertion that it searches "in all loaded namespaces". Specifically, if I do library(dplyr), I can do mutate(mtcars, myfun()) without error and transform(mtcars, myfun()) produces an error despite dplyr clearly being in the search path. Similarly, transform(mutate(mtcars), myfun()) fails, since it does not find dplyr in the direct call chain. What makes you think that this is just searching "loaded namespaces"? – r2evans Jul 8 '20 at 7:46
  • What I wanted to say was, search_calling_pkg is looking at the call stack and for each function name it finds, it's looking up "where" (getAnywhere) it can find it, and this includes all loaded namespaces, because if you mutate <- function(df, x) {NULL} and then call mutate(myfun()) while dplyr is attached to the search path myfun() will not throw an error, although you are not calling dplyr's mutate. – TimTeaFan Jul 8 '20 at 9:12
  • 1
    Thanks for the updated answer, this works great. If it is not possible to use rlang internals (like in a package), then the best option is probably to only check the namespace with rlang::env_name(environment(fun = ...)) (see my updated answer below). – TimTeaFan Jul 12 '20 at 22:15
0

Above @r2evans shows how the general question of how to check whether a function is called from within another package::function() can be solved.

If one does not want to rely on rlang internal functions a possible workaround is to use rlang::env_name(environment(fun = ...)), however in this case only the namespace / package of the calling function can be checked and not the function name:

library(dplyr)
library(rlang)

check_pkg <- function(pkg) {
  
  call_st <- sys.calls()
  
  res <- lapply(call_st, function(x) {
    
    .x <- x[[1]]
    
    tryCatch({
          rlang::env_name(environment(fun = eval(.x)))
        }, error = function(e) {
        NA
        })
    
  })
    
   if (!any(grepl(pkg, res, perl = TRUE))) {
      stop("`myfun()` must only be used inside dplyr verbs")
   }  
  
}


myfun1 <- function() {
  check_pkg("namespace:dplyr")
  NULL
}

custom_fc <- mutate

mutate <- function(df, x) { force(x); NULL; }

mtcars[1:2,] %>% mutate(myfun1())
#> Error in check_pkg("namespace:dplyr"): `myfun()` must only be used inside dplyr verbs

mtcars[1:2,] %>% dplyr::mutate(myfun1())
#>   mpg cyl disp  hp drat    wt  qsec vs am gear carb
#> 1  21   6  160 110  3.9 2.620 16.46  0  1    4    4
#> 2  21   6  160 110  3.9 2.875 17.02  0  1    4    4

mtcars[1:2,] %>% custom_fc(myfun1())
#>   mpg cyl disp  hp drat    wt  qsec vs am gear carb
#> 1  21   6  160 110  3.9 2.620 16.46  0  1    4    4
#> 2  21   6  160 110  3.9 2.875 17.02  0  1    4    4

Created on 2020-07-13 by the reprex package (v0.3.0)

For my specific issue to check if a function is called from within dplyr I came up with an efficient alternative using a call to across() as a test whether myfun() is called from within dplyr. Unlike mask$... etc. across() is an exported dplyr function.

library(dplyr)
library(rlang)

check_calling_fn <- function() {
  tryCatch({
    dplyr::across()
  }, error = function(e) {
    rlang::abort("`myfun()` must only be used inside dplyr verbs")
  })
}
  

myfun <- function() {
  check_calling_fn()
  NULL
}

microbenchmark::microbenchmark(
a = mtcars %>% dplyr::mutate(myfun()),
b = mtcars %>% dplyr::mutate()
)
#> Unit: milliseconds
#>  expr      min       lq     mean   median       uq       max neval
#>     a 2.580255 2.800734 3.783082 3.105146 3.754433 21.043388   100
#>     b 1.317511 1.393168 1.713831 1.494754 1.763758  5.645019   100

myfun()
#> Error: `myfun()` must only be used inside dplyr verbs

Created on 2020-07-06 by the reprex package (v0.3.0)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.