11

I have a StateFlow coroutine that is shared amongst various parts of my application. When I cancel the CoroutineScope of a downstream collector, a JobCancellationException is propagated up to the StateFlow, and it stops emitting values for all current and future collectors.

The StateFlow:

val songsRelay: Flow<List<Song>> by lazy {
    MutableStateFlow<List<Song>?>(null).apply {
        CoroutineScope(Dispatchers.IO)
            .launch { songDataDao.getAll().distinctUntilChanged().collect { value = it } }
    }.filterNotNull()
}

A typical 'presenter' in my code implements the following base class:

abstract class BasePresenter<T : Any> : BaseContract.Presenter<T> {

    var view: T? = null

    private val job by lazy {
        Job()
    }

    private val coroutineScope by lazy { CoroutineScope( job + Dispatchers.Main) }

    override fun bindView(view: T) {
        this.view = view
    }

    override fun unbindView() {
        job.cancel()
        view = null
    }

    fun launch(block: suspend CoroutineScope.() -> Unit): Job {
        return coroutineScope.launch(block = block)
    }
}

A BasePresenter implementation might call launch{ songsRelay.collect {...} } When the presenter is unbound, in order to prevent leaks, I cancel the parent job. Any time a presenter that was collecting the songsRelay StateFlow is unbound, the StateFlow is essentially terminated with a JobCancellationException, and no other collectors/presenters can collect values from it.

I've noticed that I can call job.cancelChildren() instead, and this seems to work (StateFlow doesn't complete with a JobCancellationException). But then I wonder what the point is of declaring a parent job, if I can't cancel the job itself. I could just remove job altogether, and call coroutineScope.coroutineContext.cancelChildren() to the same effect.

If I do just call job.cancelChildren(), is that sufficient? I feel like by not calling coroutineScope.cancel(), or job.cancel(), I may not be correctly or completely cleaning up the tasks that I have kicked off.

I also don't understand why the JobCancellationException is propagated up the hierarchy when job.cancel() is called. Isn't job the 'parent' here? Why does cancelling it affect my StateFlow?

2
  • I played around with this a bit, made a small unit test trying to reproduce your behavior. But I was unable to get the JobCancellationException. I'm just starting out with coroutines+flow after a few years of RxJava, so maybe I'm missing something. Can you share a self-contained example reproducing the issue?
    – Logain
    Commented Jul 11, 2020 at 6:51
  • Yeah, it may well be that there's something else at play here. I'll see if I can reproduce the issue in Kotlin playgrounds Commented Jul 11, 2020 at 10:34

2 Answers 2

1
+150

UPDATE:

Are you sure your songRelay is actually getting cancelled for all presenters? I ran this test and "Song relay completed" is printed, because onCompletion also catches downstream exceptions. However Presenter 2 emits the value 2 just fine, AFTER song relay prints "completed". If I cancel Presenter 2, "Song relay completed" is printed again with a JobCancellationException for Presenter 2's job.

I do find it interesting how the one flow instance will emit once each for each collector subscribed. I didn't realize that about flows.

    val songsRelay: Flow<Int> by lazy {
        MutableStateFlow<Int?>(null).apply {
            CoroutineScope(Dispatchers.IO)
                    .launch {
                        flow {
                            emit(1)
                            delay(1000)
                            emit(2)
                            delay(1000)
                            emit(3)
                        }.onCompletion {
                            println("Dao completed")
                        }.collect { value = it }
                    }
        }.filterNotNull()
                .onCompletion { cause ->
                    println("Song relay completed: $cause")
                }
    }

    @Test
    fun test() = runBlocking {
        val job = Job()
        val presenterScope1 = CoroutineScope(job + Dispatchers.Unconfined)
        val presenterScope2 = CoroutineScope(Job() + Dispatchers.Unconfined)

        presenterScope1.launch {
            songsRelay.onCompletion { cause ->
                println("Presenter 1 Completed: $cause")
            }.collect {
                println("Presenter 1 emits: $it")
            }
        }

        presenterScope2.launch {
            songsRelay.collect {
                println("Presenter 2 emits: $it")
            }
        }

        presenterScope1.cancel()

        delay(2000)
        println("Done test")
    }

I think you need to use SupervisorJob in your BasePresenter instead of Job. In general using Job would be a mistake for the whole presenter, because one failed coroutine will cancel all coroutines in the Presenter. Generally not what you want.

4
  • You may be right - SupervisorJob might be a better fit. But this doesn't really answer the question (and replacing Job with SupervisorJob does not solve the issue) Commented Jul 11, 2020 at 10:34
  • Updated my answer. I can't reproduce in tests what you are seeing. Commented Jul 12, 2020 at 1:22
  • Thanks. I think that there must be something else at play, I'm still investigating. It might be that the premise of this question is invalid Commented Jul 12, 2020 at 3:25
  • 2
    I've just had a chance to come back to this. So - no, the flow wasn't getting cancelled for all presenters. My test to replicate was flawed - I was unbinding then rebinding the same presenter, and it was on the second bind that the flow stopped collecting - because cancel() had been called - which is expected behaviour. Doh! Commented Jul 16, 2020 at 8:22
0

OK, so the problem was some false assumptions I made when testing this. The StateFlow is behaving correctly, and cancellation is working as expected.

I was thinking that between Presenters, StateFlow would stop emitting values, but I was actually testing the same instance of a Presenter - so its Job had been cancelled and thus it's not expected to continue collecting Flow emissions.

I also mistakenly took CancellationException messages emitted in onCompletion of the StateFlow to mean the StateFlow itself had been cancelled - when actually it was just saying the downstream Collector/Job had been cancelled.

I've come up with a better implementation of BasePresenter that looks like so:

abstract class BasePresenter<T : Any> : BaseContract.Presenter<T>, CoroutineScope {

    var view: T? = null

    private var job = Job()

    override val coroutineContext: CoroutineContext
        get() = job + Dispatchers.Main

    override fun bindView(view: T) {
        if (job.isCancelled) {
            job = Job()
        }
        this.view = view
    }

    override fun unbindView() {
        job.cancel()
        view = null
    }
}
4
  • 1
    Nice. I would still recommend using SupervisorJob here though. For someone using your BasePresenter they probably won't expect that when launch { getApi1 } fails, somewhere else where they've used launch { getApi2 } will also be cancelled. Commented Jul 29, 2020 at 5:40
  • 1
    Thanks. Yes, I'm using a SupervisorJob for this myself, I just didn't want to introduce a new concept to the Q&A. Commented Jul 29, 2020 at 5:46
  • Always remember that StateFlow never completes. It is impossible to cancel it :) Commented Nov 12, 2020 at 9:23
  • @HarryTimothy so we can waste resources if we run several and never use them again? then probably it's ideal for cases where we need the data as long as the app is alive?
    – stdout
    Commented May 24, 2021 at 11:50

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