7

I'm building a React application and I started using CRA. I configured the routes of the app using React Router. Pages components are lazy-loaded.

There are 2 pages: Home and About.

...
const Home = lazy(() => import('./Home'));
const About = lazy(() => import('./About'));

...
      <Suspense fallback={<div>Loading...</div>}>
        <Switch>
          <Route path="/about" component={About} />
          <Route path="/" component={Home} />
        </Switch>
      </Suspense>
...

Each page uses the Button component below.

import React from 'react';
import styles from './Button.module.scss';

const Button = ({ children, className = '' }) => (
    <button className={`${styles.btn} ${className}`}>{children}</button>
);

export default Button;

The Button.module.scss file just sets the background color of the button to red.

.btn {
    background: red;
}

The Button component accepts a className prop which is then added to the rendered button. This is because I want to give freedom to the consumer of the component. For example, in some pages margins could be needed or the background should be yellow instead of red.

To make it simple, I just want to have a different background color for the Button based on the current page, so that:

  • Home page => Blue button
  • About page => Yellow button

Each page is defined as below:

import React from 'react';
import Button from './Button';
import styles from './[PageName].module.scss';

const [PageName] = () => (
    <div>
        <h1>[PageName]</h1>
        <Button className={styles.pageBtn}>[ExpectedColor]</Button>
    </div>
);

export default [PageName];

where [PageName] is the name of the page and [ExpectedColor] is the corresponding expected color based on the above bullet list (blue or yellow).

The imported SCSS module, exports a class .pageBtn which sets the background property to the desired color.

Note: I could use a prop on the Button component which defines the variant to display (Blue/Yellow) and based on that prop add a class defined in the SCSS file. I don't want to do that since the change could be something that doesn't belong to a variant (e.g. margin-top).

The problem

If I run the application using yarn start, the application works fine. However, if I build the application (yarn build) and then I start serving the application (e.g. using serve -s build), the behavior is different and the application doesn't work as expected.

When the Home page is loaded, the button is correctly shown with a blue background. Inspecting the loaded CSS chunk, it contains:

.Button_btn__2cUFR {
    background: red
}

.Home_pageBtn__nnyWK {
    background: blue
}

That's fine. Then I click on the navigation link to open the About page. Even in this case, the button is shown correctly with a yellow background. Inspecting the loaded CSS chunk, it contains:

.Button_btn__2cUFR {
    background: red
}

.About_pageBtn__3jjV7 {
    background: yellow
}

When I go back to the Home page, the button is now displayed with a red background instead of yellow. That's because the About page has loaded the CSS above which defines again the Button_btn__2cUFR class. Since the class is now after the Home_pageBtn__nnyWK class definition, the button is displayed as red.

Note: the Button component is not exported on the common chunk because its size is too small. Having that in a common chunk could solve the problem. However, my question is about small shared components.

Solutions

I have thought to 2 solutions which, however, I don't like too much:

Increase selectors specificity

The classes specified in the [PageName].module.scss could be defined as:

.pageBtn.pageBtn {
   background: [color];
}

This will increase the selector specificity and will override the default Button_btn__2cUFR class. However, each page chunk will include the shared components in case the component is quite small (less than 30kb). Also, the consumer of the component has to know that trick.

Eject and configure webpack

Ejecting the app (or using something like react-app-rewired) would allow specifying the minimum size for common chunk using webpack. However, that's not what I would like for all the components.


To summarize, the question is: what is the correct working way of overriding styles of shared components when using lazy-loaded routes?

2
  • Maybe the solution is to put the classes inside the button instead of in your page and simply pass a prop that tells what "kind" of button it is. This would prevent the whole category of problems, but doesn't technically answer your question. Reason: I think you should make use of the "expressive" part of what react gives you.
    – Webber
    Commented Jul 9, 2020 at 19:58
  • Thanks @Webber. yes, I'm aware of that. However, if I just want to override the padding in multiple pages with different values this would end up creating N variant of the button, one for each usage. Even if possible, I don't think it's the best approach. Commented Jul 10, 2020 at 8:55

3 Answers 3

3
+250

You can use the following logic with config file for any pages. Also, You can send config data from remote server (req/res API) and handle with redux.

See Demo: CodeSandBox

create components directory and create files like below:

src
 |---components
      |---Button
      |     |---Button.jsx
      |     |---Button.module.css

Button Component:

// Button.jsx

import React from "react";
import styles from "./Button.module.css";

const Button = props => {
  const { children, className, ...otherProps } = props;
  return (
    <button className={styles[`${className}`]} {...otherProps}>
      {children}
    </button>
  );
};

export default Button;

...

// Button.module.css

.Home_btn {
  background: red;
}
.About_btn {
  background: blue;
}

create utils directory and create AppUtils.js file:

This file handle config files of pages and return new object

class AppUtils {
  static setRoutes(config) {
    let routes = [...config.routes];

    if (config.settings) {
      routes = routes.map(route => {
        return {
          ...route,
          settings: { ...config.settings, ...route.settings }
        };
      });
    }

    return [...routes];
  }

  static generateRoutesFromConfigs(configs) {
    let allRoutes = [];
    configs.forEach(config => {
      allRoutes = [...allRoutes, ...this.setRoutes(config)];
    });
    return allRoutes;
  }
}

export default AppUtils;

create app-configs directory and create routesConfig.jsx file:

This file lists and organizes routes.

import React from "react";

import AppUtils from "../utils/AppUtils";
import { pagesConfig } from "../pages/pagesConfig";

const routeConfigs = [...pagesConfig];

const routes = [
  ...AppUtils.generateRoutesFromConfigs(routeConfigs),
  {
    component: () => <h1>404 page not found</h1>
  }
];

export default routes;

Modify index.js and App.js files to:

// index.js

import React from "react";
import ReactDOM from "react-dom";
import { BrowserRouter as Router } from "react-router-dom";

import App from "./App";

const rootElement = document.getElementById("root");
ReactDOM.render(
  <React.StrictMode>
    <Router>
      <App />
    </Router>
  </React.StrictMode>,
  rootElement
);

...

react-router-config: Static route configuration helpers for React Router.

// App.js

import React, { Suspense } from "react";
import { Switch, Link } from "react-router-dom";
import { renderRoutes } from "react-router-config";

import routes from "./app-configs/routesConfig";

import "./styles.css";

export default function App() {
  return (
    <div className="App">
      <ul>
        <li>
          <Link to="/">Home</Link>
        </li>
        <li>
          <Link to="/about">About</Link>
        </li>
      </ul>
      <Suspense fallback={<h1>loading....</h1>}>
        <Switch>{renderRoutes(routes)}</Switch>
      </Suspense>
    </div>
  );
}

create pages directory and create files and subdirectory like below:

src
 |---pages
      |---about
      |     |---AboutPage.jsx
      |     |---AboutPageConfig.jsx
      |
      |---home
           |---HomePage.jsx
           |---HomePageConfig.jsx
      |
      |---pagesConfig.js

About Page files:

// AboutPage.jsx

import React from "react";
import Button from "../../components/Button/Button";

const AboutPage = props => {
  const btnClass = props.route.settings.layout.config.buttonClass;
  return (
    <>
      <h1>about page</h1>
      <Button className={btnClass}>about button</Button>
    </>
  );
};

export default AboutPage;

...

// AboutPageConfig.jsx

import React from "react";

export const AboutPageConfig = {
  settings: {
    layout: {
      config: {
        buttonClass: "About_btn"
      }
    }
  },
  routes: [
    {
      path: "/about",
      exact: true,
      component: React.lazy(() => import("./AboutPage"))
    }
  ]
};

Home Page files:

// HomePage.jsx

import React from "react";
import Button from "../../components/Button/Button";

const HomePage = props => {
  const btnClass = props.route.settings.layout.config.buttonClass;
  return (
    <>
      <h1>home page</h1>
      <Button className={btnClass}>home button</Button>
    </>
  );
};

export default HomePage;

...

// HomePageConfig.jsx

import React from "react";

export const HomePageConfig = {
  settings: {
    layout: {
      config: {
        buttonClass: "Home_btn"
      }
    }
  },
  routes: [
    {
      path: "/",
      exact: true,
      component: React.lazy(() => import("./HomePage"))
    }
  ]
};

...

// pagesConfig.js

import { HomePageConfig } from "./home/HomePageConfig";
import { AboutPageConfig } from "./about/AboutPageConfig";

export const pagesConfig = [HomePageConfig, AboutPageConfig];

Edited section: With HOC Maybe this way: CodeSandBox

create hoc dir and withPage.jsx file:

src
 |---hoc
      |---withPage.jsx

...

// withPage.jsx

import React, { useEffect, useState } from "react";

export function withPage(Component, path) {
  function loadComponentFromPath(path, setStyles) {
     import(path).then(component => setStyles(component.default));
   }
  return function(props) {
    const [styles, setStyles] = useState();
    
    useEffect(() => {
      loadComponentFromPath(`../pages/${path}`, setStyles);
    }, []);
    return <Component {...props} styles={styles} />;
  };
}

And then pages like below:

src
 |---pages
      |---about
      |     |---About.jsx
      |     |---About.module.css
      |
      |---home
           |---Home.jsx
           |---Home.module.css

About.jsx file:

// About.jsx

import React from "react";
import { withPage } from "../../hoc/withPage";

const About = props => {
  const {styles} = props;
  return (
    <button className={styles && styles.AboutBtn}>About</button>
  );
};

export default withPage(About, "about/About.module.css");

About.module.css file:

// About.module.css

.AboutBtn {
  background: yellow;
}

Home.jsx file:

// Home.jsx

import React from "react";
import { withPage } from "../../hoc/withPage";

const Home = props => {
  const { styles } = props;
  return <button className={styles && styles.HomeBtn}>Home</button>;
};

export default withPage(Home, "home/Home.module.css");

Home.module.css file:

// Home.module.css

.HomeBtn {
  background: red;
}
2
  • Thank you. The solution, under the hood, is just passing a class using the configured route. Also, the CSS rename seems that won't be applied since the class names are hardcoded as a string. I also noticed that the styles are all defined in the Button.module.scss: this means that the button component itself is aware where it'll be used. I would prefer the button variant approach instead of this solution because it makes the component unaware on where it'll be used. Commented Jul 14, 2020 at 9:58
  • @OmarMuscatello, Check edited section. I added the HOC solution Commented Jul 15, 2020 at 7:52
1

I would suggest instead of adding both the default styles and the consumer styles, use the consumer's styles over yours and use your as a callback if not supplied. The consumer can still compose your defaults with the composes keyword.

Button.js

import React from 'react';
import styles from './Button.module.scss';

const Button = ({ children, className}) => (
    <button className={className ?? styles.btn}>{children}</button>
);

export default Button;

SomePage.module.scss

.pageBtn {
  // First some defaults
  composes: btn from './Button.module.scss';
  // And override some of the defautls here
  background: yellow;
}

If you wish, use sass @extends or @mixin instead

EDIT: Haven't tested it, but could it be that just by using composes webpack will make sure to bundle the defaults only once? Thus you're no longer needed to change your Button.js code with the ??

1
  • Thank you. Unfortunately, it doesn't work. I have already tried this solution in the past, but it suffers the exact same problem as described in my question. Commented Jul 10, 2020 at 9:05
1

Solution 1

I know this is very obvious, but would work anyway:

Set !important on your overwriting css rules, thus bypassing specificity:

[PageName].module.scss:

.btn {
  color: yellow !important;
}

However, most of the strict devs I know would avoid this keyword at all cost.

Why ? Because when you start to have a lot of !important your css is a nightmare to debug. If you start writing !important rules with higher specificity, you know you have gone too far

It is only meant for corner-cases like yours, you might as well use it.


Solution 2

fix CRA config to enforce style tags order.

It is open-source after all :)

You can give your input on this bug here (upvote might give it more visibility):

https://github.com/facebook/create-react-app/issues/7190


Solution 3 (Update)

You could create a SCSS mixin in a new customButton.scss file, to generate css rules with higher specificity:

// customButton.scss
@mixin customBtn() {
  :global {
    .customBtn.override {
      @content;
    }
  }
}

We will use two static class names (using the :global selector), because that way their name won't change based on where they are imported from.

Now use that mixin in your pages' SCSS:

// [pageName].module.scss
@import 'customButton.scss';

@include customBtn {
  color: yellow;
}

css output should be:

.customBtn.override {
  // put everything you want to customize here
  color: yellow;
}

In Button.jsx: apply both class names to your button in addition to styles.btn:

// Button.jsx
const Button = ({ children, className = '' }) => (
    <button className={`${styles.btn} customBtn override ${className}`}>
      {children}
    </button>
);

(Note that these are not referenced through the styles object, but the classname directly)

The main drawback is these are not dynamic class names, so you have to watch out to avoid conflicts yourself like we use to do before. But I think it should do the trick

5
  • Thank you. I would exclude the solution with !important for the problems you described and also because I would need that for all the properties I want to override. Before considering a fix to CRA, I would like to understand if there's already a solution :) Thank you also for the link to the issue. Commented Jul 10, 2020 at 9:06
  • @OmarMuscatello I've come up with another idea, not tested but let me know if that works for you. (I've updated my answer)
    – Apolo
    Commented Jul 10, 2020 at 12:35
  • Thank you for the update. As you wrote, the drawback is that I'll lose the scoping of the class to the component since there won't be any rename on the class. I'm looking for a solution which maintains all the advantages I have right now (including the CSS classes rename). Commented Jul 14, 2020 at 9:55
  • You should try to scope it by hand, you know what you css template classname is, you know the scope (Button) so you should maybe write Button__custom or something like that which won't interfere with anything else
    – Apolo
    Commented Jul 14, 2020 at 14:25
  • Honestly, I don't think you'll find a solution that preserve every advantages you have right now. But if someone end up with one he will get my upvote for sure !
    – Apolo
    Commented Jul 14, 2020 at 14:25

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