265

I have a string called "hello world"

I need to replace the word "world" to "csharp"

for this I use:

string.Replace("World", "csharp");

but as a result, I don't get the string replaced. The reason is case sensitiveness. The original string contains "world" whereas I'm trying to replace "World".

Is there any way to avoid this case sensitiveness in string.Replace method?

4

19 Answers 19

365

You could use a Regex and perform a case insensitive replace:

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        string input = "hello WoRlD";
        string result = 
           Regex.Replace(input, "world", "csharp", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);
        Console.WriteLine(result); // prints "hello csharp"
    }
}
5
  • 25
    Not works with Regex language elements, so it's not universal method. Steve B's answer is correct.
    – AsValeO
    Aug 4, 2015 at 7:11
  • 1
    So you better don't write hello. world? or anything else containing regex operators. Mar 12, 2018 at 15:37
  • 12
    Just in case anyone wasn't inclined to read further, this was the accepted answer in 2011 and has a huge number of votes. This works fine if you only have to replace alphanumeric. However, if you have to replace any punctuation characters you can get into big trouble. Oleg Zarevennyi's answer is superior, but has only a small number of votes because it was posted in 2017. Feb 28, 2019 at 19:12
  • Replace with $$ doesn't work. If your replacement can contain $$ then go with Oleg's solution. Apr 9, 2021 at 15:16
  • Regex is too complicated. It's really just the worst. The learning curve is high just to get started, and even far higher to actually be good at it. So most people just go to the internet to copy/paste well tested Regex expressions. And even THEN they often aren't perfect. Try looking for the perfect Regex for email and you'll see what I mean. It has its uses, particularly in declarative contexts such as IIS Rewrite Rules where you can't use procedural logic. But I have absolutely zero use for it in c# where I can write perfectly readable and maintainable code.
    – BVernon
    Apr 7 at 7:17
139
var search = "world";
var replacement = "csharp";
string result = Regex.Replace(
    stringToLookInto,
    Regex.Escape(search), 
    replacement.Replace("$","$$"), 
    RegexOptions.IgnoreCase
);

The Regex.Escape is useful if you rely on user input which can contains Regex language elements

Update

Thanks to comments, you actually don't have to escape the replacement string.

Here is a small fiddle that tests the code:

using System;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;           
public class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {

        var tests = new[] {
            new { Input="abcdef", Search="abc", Replacement="xyz", Expected="xyzdef" },
            new { Input="ABCdef", Search="abc", Replacement="xyz", Expected="xyzdef" },
            new { Input="A*BCdef", Search="a*bc", Replacement="xyz", Expected="xyzdef" },
            new { Input="abcdef", Search="abc", Replacement="x*yz", Expected="x*yzdef" },       
            new { Input="abcdef", Search="abc", Replacement="$", Expected="$def" },
        };


        foreach(var test in tests){
            var result = ReplaceCaseInsensitive(test.Input, test.Search, test.Replacement);

            Console.WriteLine(
                "Success: {0}, Actual: {1}, {2}",
                result == test.Expected,
                result,
                test
            );

        }


    }

    private static string ReplaceCaseInsensitive(string input, string search, string replacement){
        string result = Regex.Replace(
            input,
            Regex.Escape(search), 
            replacement.Replace("$","$$"), 
            RegexOptions.IgnoreCase
        );
        return result;
    }
}

Its output is:

Success: True, Actual: xyzdef, { Input = abcdef, Search = abc, Replacement = xyz, Expected = xyzdef } 
Success: True, Actual: xyzdef, { Input = ABCdef, Search = abc, Replacement = xyz, Expected = xyzdef }
Success: True, Actual: xyzdef, { Input = A*BCdef, Search = a*bc, Replacement = xyz, Expected = xyzdef } 
Success: True, Actual: x*yzdef, { Input = abcdef, Search = abc, Replacement = x*yz, Expected = x*yzdef} 
Success: True, Actual: $def, { Input = abcdef, Search = abc, Replacement = $, Expected = $def }
3
  • 2
    This method fails if replacement = "!@#$%^&*()" You get "!@\#\$%\^&*()" replaced instead.
    – Kcoder
    Oct 10, 2014 at 22:45
  • 2
    The second Regex.Escape is bad, it will prefix special characters with backslashes. Seems like the best way is .Replace("$", "$$"), which is kinda dumb (stackoverflow.com/a/10078353). Apr 17, 2015 at 8:43
  • 2
    @dannyTuppeny: you are right... I updated the answer accordingly
    – Steve B
    Apr 17, 2015 at 8:53
94

2.5X FASTER and MOST EFFECTIVE method than other's regular expressions methods:

/// <summary>
/// Returns a new string in which all occurrences of a specified string in the current instance are replaced with another 
/// specified string according the type of search to use for the specified string.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="str">The string performing the replace method.</param>
/// <param name="oldValue">The string to be replaced.</param>
/// <param name="newValue">The string replace all occurrences of <paramref name="oldValue"/>. 
/// If value is equal to <c>null</c>, than all occurrences of <paramref name="oldValue"/> will be removed from the <paramref name="str"/>.</param>
/// <param name="comparisonType">One of the enumeration values that specifies the rules for the search.</param>
/// <returns>A string that is equivalent to the current string except that all instances of <paramref name="oldValue"/> are replaced with <paramref name="newValue"/>. 
/// If <paramref name="oldValue"/> is not found in the current instance, the method returns the current instance unchanged.</returns>
[DebuggerStepThrough]
public static string Replace(this string str,
    string oldValue, string @newValue,
    StringComparison comparisonType)
{

    // Check inputs.
    if (str == null)
    {
        // Same as original .NET C# string.Replace behavior.
        throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(str));
    }
    if (str.Length == 0)
    {
        // Same as original .NET C# string.Replace behavior.
        return str;
    }
    if (oldValue == null)
    {
        // Same as original .NET C# string.Replace behavior.
        throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(oldValue));
    }
    if (oldValue.Length == 0)
    {
        // Same as original .NET C# string.Replace behavior.
        throw new ArgumentException("String cannot be of zero length.");
    }


    //if (oldValue.Equals(newValue, comparisonType))
    //{
    //This condition has no sense
    //It will prevent method from replacesing: "Example", "ExAmPlE", "EXAMPLE" to "example"
    //return str;
    //}



    // Prepare string builder for storing the processed string.
    // Note: StringBuilder has a better performance than String by 30-40%.
    StringBuilder resultStringBuilder = new StringBuilder(str.Length);



    // Analyze the replacement: replace or remove.
    bool isReplacementNullOrEmpty = string.IsNullOrEmpty(@newValue);



    // Replace all values.
    const int valueNotFound = -1;
    int foundAt;
    int startSearchFromIndex = 0;
    while ((foundAt = str.IndexOf(oldValue, startSearchFromIndex, comparisonType)) != valueNotFound)
    {

        // Append all characters until the found replacement.
        int @charsUntilReplacment = foundAt - startSearchFromIndex;
        bool isNothingToAppend = @charsUntilReplacment == 0;
        if (!isNothingToAppend)
        {
            resultStringBuilder.Append(str, startSearchFromIndex, @charsUntilReplacment);
        }



        // Process the replacement.
        if (!isReplacementNullOrEmpty)
        {
            resultStringBuilder.Append(@newValue);
        }


        // Prepare start index for the next search.
        // This needed to prevent infinite loop, otherwise method always start search 
        // from the start of the string. For example: if an oldValue == "EXAMPLE", newValue == "example"
        // and comparisonType == "any ignore case" will conquer to replacing:
        // "EXAMPLE" to "example" to "example" to "example" … infinite loop.
        startSearchFromIndex = foundAt + oldValue.Length;
        if (startSearchFromIndex == str.Length)
        {
            // It is end of the input string: no more space for the next search.
            // The input string ends with a value that has already been replaced. 
            // Therefore, the string builder with the result is complete and no further action is required.
            return resultStringBuilder.ToString();
        }
    }


    // Append the last part to the result.
    int @charsUntilStringEnd = str.Length - startSearchFromIndex;
    resultStringBuilder.Append(str, startSearchFromIndex, @charsUntilStringEnd);


    return resultStringBuilder.ToString();

}

Note: ignore case == StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase as parameter for StringComparison comparisonType. It is the fastest, case-insensitive way to replace all values.


Advantages of this method:

  • High CPU and MEMORY efficiency;
  • It is the fastest solution, 2.5 times faster than other's methods with regular expressions (proof in the end);
  • Suitable for removing parts from the input string (set newValue to null), optimized for this;
  • Same as original .NET C# string.Replace behavior, same exceptions;
  • Well commented, easy to understand;
  • Simpler – no regular expressions. Regular expressions are always slower because of their versatility (even compiled);
  • This method is well tested and there are no hidden flaws like infinite loop in other's solutions, even highly rated:

@AsValeO: Not works with Regex language elements, so it's not universal method

@Mike Stillion: There is a problem with this code. If the text in new is a superset of the text in old, this can produce an endless loop.


Benchmark-proof: this solution is 2.59X times faster than regex from @Steve B., code:

// Results:
// 1/2. Regular expression solution: 4486 milliseconds
// 2/2. Current solution: 1727 milliseconds — 2.59X times FASTER! than regex!

// Notes: the test was started 5 times, the result is an average; release build.

const int benchmarkIterations = 1000000;
const string sourceString = "aaaaddsdsdsdsdsd";
const string oldValue = "D";
const string newValue = "Fod";
long totalLenght = 0;

Stopwatch regexStopwatch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
string tempString1;
for (int i = 0; i < benchmarkIterations; i++)
{
    tempString1 = sourceString;
    tempString1 = ReplaceCaseInsensitive(tempString1, oldValue, newValue);

    totalLenght = totalLenght + tempString1.Length;
}
regexStopwatch.Stop();



Stopwatch currentSolutionStopwatch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
string tempString2;
for (int i = 0; i < benchmarkIterations; i++)
{
    tempString2 = sourceString;
    tempString2 = tempString2.Replace(oldValue, newValue,
        StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase);

    totalLenght = totalLenght + tempString2.Length;
}
currentSolutionStopwatch.Stop();

Original idea – @Darky711; thanks @MinerR for StringBuilder.

6
  • 6
    I bet you can make this even faster using a StringBuilder rather than a string.
    – MineR
    Mar 1, 2018 at 6:21
  • 2
    @MineR You are right, I originally just updated the @Darky711 solution without infinite loop, so I used the String. However, the StringBuilder is really faster by 30-40% than the String. I've updated the solution. Thanks ;) Mar 1, 2018 at 20:06
  • 2
    Interesting approach. Probably the better one (better than mine :)) when performance matters. Typically a method to add to a common shared code library.
    – Steve B
    Nov 5, 2018 at 8:30
  • 2
    The use of 'nameof' expressions makes this valid only for C# 6.0 and beyond. If you're in VS2013, you can use it by simply deleting the operands in the exceptions.
    – LanchPad
    Mar 21, 2019 at 16:06
  • 1
    You have a bug when calling replace("abc","abc\u00AD","def",StringComparison.CurrentCulture) the expected result is "def" (\u00AD is a soft hyphen - test case taken from .net core string replace test cases at github.com/dotnet/runtime/blob/… ). The fix is to change "if (startSearchFromIndex == str.Length)" to "if (startSearchFromIndex >= str.Length)"
    – Dani Avni
    Jan 15, 2021 at 7:38
34

Lots of suggestions using Regex. How about this extension method without it:

public static string Replace(this string str, string old, string @new, StringComparison comparison)
{
    @new = @new ?? "";
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(str) || string.IsNullOrEmpty(old) || old.Equals(@new, comparison))
        return str;
    int foundAt = 0;
    while ((foundAt = str.IndexOf(old, foundAt, comparison)) != -1)
    {
        str = str.Remove(foundAt, old.Length).Insert(foundAt, @new);
        foundAt += @new.Length;
    }
    return str;
}
7
  • Note that the comparison argument is not being used to do the actual replacement (it is always case insensitive)
    – Bolo
    Mar 30, 2016 at 18:52
  • 3
    There is a problem with this code. If the text in new is a superset of the text in old, this can produce an endless loop. Once new is inserted at FoundAt, the value of FoundAt needs to be advanced by the length of new. Sep 20, 2016 at 13:34
  • comparison parameter should be used in IndexOf, instead of StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase
    – Maxence
    Dec 8, 2016 at 17:18
  • @Bolo I've edited it to use the comparison argument (might take a bit to be peer reviewed).
    – bradlis7
    Jan 8, 2018 at 19:52
  • 2
    I'd also separate this condition for returning the new string: if(old.Equals(@new, comparison)) return @new;, since the new string may differ in uppercase/lowercase. Jun 25, 2018 at 11:06
32

Extensions make our lives easier:

static public class StringExtensions
{
    static public string ReplaceInsensitive(this string str, string from, string to)
    {
        str = Regex.Replace(str, from, to, RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);
        return str;
    }
}
1
  • 13
    And escaping makes our lives less buggy :-) return Regex.Replace(input, Regex.Escape(search), replacement.Replace("$", "$$"), RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);
    – Vman
    Dec 13, 2017 at 12:38
17

You can use the Microsoft.VisualBasic namespace to find this helper function:

Replace(sourceString, "replacethis", "withthis", , , CompareMethod.Text)
3
  • I was proud of my answer until I saw this which is a better answer because it is built in. Ex: Strings.Replace("TeStInG123", "t", "z", 1, -1, CompareMethod.Text) returns "zeSzInG123"
    – Bolo
    Nov 10, 2017 at 16:31
  • 1
    Warning, Strings.Replace returns null if the string being search is an empty string.
    – Mafu Josh
    Sep 17, 2018 at 14:02
  • 1
    In .Net 4.7.2, you need to add a reference to Microsoft.VisualBasic to get this to work. In .Net Core, the Microsoft.VisualBasic.Strings class (in Version 10.3.0 anyway) does not appear to implement the Replace function. This works in Powershell as well if you Add-Class -AssemblyName Microsoft.VisualBasic first. Nov 29, 2018 at 15:29
10

.Net Core has this method built-in: Replace(String, String, StringComparison) Doc. Now we can simply write: "...".Replace("oldValue", "newValue", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase)

7

Modified @Darky711's answer to use the passed in comparison type and match the framework replace naming and xml comments as closely as possible.

/// <summary>
/// Returns a new string in which all occurrences of a specified string in the current instance are replaced with another specified string.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="str">The string performing the replace method.</param>
/// <param name="oldValue">The string to be replaced.</param>
/// <param name="newValue">The string replace all occurrances of oldValue.</param>
/// <param name="comparisonType">Type of the comparison.</param>
/// <returns></returns>
public static string Replace(this string str, string oldValue, string @newValue, StringComparison comparisonType)
{
    @newValue = @newValue ?? string.Empty;
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(str) || string.IsNullOrEmpty(oldValue) || oldValue.Equals(@newValue, comparisonType))
    {
        return str;
    }
    int foundAt;
    while ((foundAt = str.IndexOf(oldValue, 0, comparisonType)) != -1)
    {
        str = str.Remove(foundAt, oldValue.Length).Insert(foundAt, @newValue);
    }
    return str;
}
6

(Edited: wasn't aware of the `naked link' problem, sorry about that)

Taken from here:

string myString = "find Me and replace ME";
string strReplace = "me";
myString = Regex.Replace(myString, "me", strReplace, RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);

Seems you are not the first to complain of the lack of case insensitive string.Replace.

0
3

I have wrote extension method:

public static string ReplaceIgnoreCase(this string source, string oldVale, string newVale)
    {
        if (source.IsNullOrEmpty() || oldVale.IsNullOrEmpty())
            return source;

        var stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();
        string result = source;

        int index = result.IndexOf(oldVale, StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase);

        while (index >= 0)
        {
            if (index > 0)
                stringBuilder.Append(result.Substring(0, index));

            if (newVale.IsNullOrEmpty().IsNot())
                stringBuilder.Append(newVale);

            stringBuilder.Append(result.Substring(index + oldVale.Length));

            result = stringBuilder.ToString();

            index = result.IndexOf(oldVale, StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase);
        }

        return result;
    }

I use two additional extension methods for previous extension method:

    public static bool IsNullOrEmpty(this string value)
    {
        return string.IsNullOrEmpty(value);
    }

    public static bool IsNot(this bool val)
    {
        return val == false;
    }
4
  • 4
    Upvoted. But IsNot is taking extensions too seriously :)
    – nawfal
    Dec 8, 2017 at 11:33
  • Disappointing, this does not work in all situations. I was passing a distinguished name and it appends until the string is a million characters long and then runs out of memory
    – Bbb
    May 2, 2018 at 16:47
  • Alternative offered below that fixed my issue
    – Bbb
    May 2, 2018 at 18:14
  • I really like .IsNot
    – ttugates
    Dec 27, 2019 at 15:17
3

Doesn't this work: I cant imaging anything else being much quicker or easier.

public static class ExtensionMethodsString
{
    public static string Replace(this String thisString, string oldValue, string newValue, StringComparison stringComparison)
    {
        string working = thisString;
        int index = working.IndexOf(oldValue, stringComparison);
        while (index != -1)
        {
            working = working.Remove(index, oldValue.Length);
            working = working.Insert(index, newValue);
            index = index + newValue.Length;
            index = working.IndexOf(oldValue, index, stringComparison);
        }
        return working;
    }
}
1
  • I don't know if it's faster but it's concise, doesn't use regex overhead and potential problems and uses the built-in StringComparison.
    – fvlinden
    Jun 14, 2020 at 8:12
2

Extending Petrucio's answer with Regex.Escape on the search string, and escaping matched group as suggested in Steve B's answer (and some minor changes to my taste):

public static class StringExtensions
{
    public static string ReplaceIgnoreCase(this string str, string from, string to)
    {
        return Regex.Replace(str, Regex.Escape(from), to.Replace("$", "$$"), RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);
    }
}

Which will produce the following expected results:

Console.WriteLine("(heLLo) wOrld".ReplaceIgnoreCase("(hello) world", "Hi $1 Universe")); // Hi $1 Universe
Console.WriteLine("heLLo wOrld".ReplaceIgnoreCase("(hello) world", "Hi $1 Universe"));   // heLLo wOrld

However without performing the escapes you would get the following, which is not an expected behaviour from a String.Replace that is just case-insensitive:

Console.WriteLine("(heLLo) wOrld".ReplaceIgnoreCase_NoEscaping("(hello) world", "Hi $1 Universe")); // (heLLo) wOrld
Console.WriteLine("heLLo wOrld".ReplaceIgnoreCase_NoEscaping("(hello) world", "Hi $1 Universe"));   // Hi heLLo Universe
1

Using @Georgy Batalov solution I had a problem when using the following example

string original = "blah,DC=bleh,DC=blih,DC=bloh,DC=com"; string replaced = original.ReplaceIgnoreCase(",DC=", ".")

Below is how I rewrote his extension

public static string ReplaceIgnoreCase(this string source, string oldVale, 
string newVale)
    {
        if (source.IsNullOrEmpty() || oldVale.IsNullOrEmpty())
            return source;

        var stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();
        string result = source;

        int index = result.IndexOf(oldVale, StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase);
        bool initialRun = true;

        while (index >= 0)
        {
            string substr = result.Substring(0, index);
            substr = substr + newVale;
            result = result.Remove(0, index);
            result = result.Remove(0, oldVale.Length);

            stringBuilder.Append(substr);

            index = result.IndexOf(oldVale, StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase);
        }

        if (result.Length > 0)
        {
            stringBuilder.Append(result);
        }

        return stringBuilder.ToString();
    }
1

My this Method could Ignore Case as well as Select Only Whole Word

public static string Replace(this string s, string word, string by, StringComparison stringComparison, bool WholeWord)
{
    s = s + " ";
    int wordSt;
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    while (s.IndexOf(word, stringComparison) > -1)
    {
        wordSt = s.IndexOf(word, stringComparison);
        if (!WholeWord || ((wordSt == 0 || !Char.IsLetterOrDigit(char.Parse(s.Substring(wordSt - 1, 1)))) && !Char.IsLetterOrDigit(char.Parse(s.Substring(wordSt + word.Length, 1)))))
        {
            sb.Append(s.Substring(0, wordSt) + by);
        }
        else
        {
            sb.Append(s.Substring(0, wordSt + word.Length));
        }
        s = s.Substring(wordSt + word.Length);
    }
    sb.Append(s);
    return sb.ToString().Substring(0, sb.Length - 1);
}
0

Below function is to remove all match word like (this) from the string set. By Ravikant Sonare.

private static void myfun()
{
    string mystring = "thiTHISThiss This THIS THis tThishiThiss. Box";
    var regex = new Regex("this", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);
    mystring = regex.Replace(mystring, "");
    string[] str = mystring.Split(' ');
    for (int i = 0; i < str.Length; i++)
    {
        if (regex.IsMatch(str[i].ToString()))
        {
            mystring = mystring.Replace(str[i].ToString(), string.Empty);

        }
    }
    Console.WriteLine(mystring);
}
1
  • This function is replace all string from the the string set ... by Ravikant Sonare, Apr 16, 2017 at 3:35
0

You can also try the Regex class.

var regex = new Regex( "camel", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase ); var newSentence = regex.Replace( sentence, "horse" );

0

Use this, Tested and 100% Worked!

For VB.NET

Dim myString As String
Dim oldValue As String
Dim newValue As String

myString = Form1.TextBox1.Text
oldValue = TextBox1.Text
newValue = TextBox2.Text

Dim working As String = myString
Dim index As Integer = working.IndexOf(oldValue, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase)

While index <> -1
    working = working.Remove(index, oldValue.Length)
    working = working.Insert(index, newValue)
    index = index + newValue.Length
    index = working.IndexOf(oldValue, index, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase)
    Form1.TextBox1.Text = working
End While

For C#

private void Button2_Click(System.Object sender, System.EventArgs e)
{
    string myString;
    string oldValue;
    string newValue;

    myString = Form1.TextBox1.Text;
    oldValue = TextBox1.Text;
    newValue = TextBox2.Text;

    string working = myString;
    int index = working.IndexOf(oldValue, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase);

    while (index != -1)
    {
        working = working.Remove(index, oldValue.Length);
        working = working.Insert(index, newValue);
        index = index + newValue.Length;
        index = working.IndexOf(oldValue, index, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase);
        Form1.TextBox1.Text = working;
    }
}
-1

Another way is to ignore the case sensitivity in String.Replace() using the option StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase

string.Replace("World", "csharp", StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase)
-2

I prefer this - "Hello World".ToLower().Replace( "world", "csharp" );

3
  • 1
    This will lowercase everything, even words that weren't supposed to be replaced.
    – JJJ
    Jan 18, 2019 at 8:47
  • Obviously, you can use this only if you are not bothered about the case.
    – Harshal
    Jan 21, 2019 at 6:59
  • I believe this is the best answer for simple use of the Replace method in most cases, despite all of the down votes. If you are doing an edge case that is more complex, then you probably should not be using Replace() to begin with.
    – Chris M.
    Jun 1, 2021 at 15:45

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