1

I need my object "Launcher" to detect if its associated process is running or not. My initial solution was to simply run a for loop using psutil

def Launcher(self, processName):
    self.processName=processName

def process_up(self, attempts=0):
        if attempts <= 3:
            try:
                if self.processName in (p.name() for p in psutil.process_iter()):
                    return True
                else:
                    return False
                
            except:
                self.process_up(attempts=1)
        else:
            logging.error("Psutil Fatal Error. Unable to check status of process {}".format(self.processName))
            return False

The recursion being used for the very rare case where a process p is detected in the for loop but dies before .name() is called.

Anyway, it all sounded fine and dandy until I tested it with all my processes (about 40 of them, so 40 Launchers are running) and the issue is that running this loop takes about 0,1 seconds, which translates into a grand total of ~4 seconds .

However, I need to aim at <1 second. What are other super fast ways to find if a given process is running? I don't need to know anything about the process (I don't care about its pid or name), just if it's up or not.

As a side note: I cannot use multithreading or any kind of parallelism. I have to run these Launchers sequentially.

EDIT: I've tried the following code as well, which was definitely better performance wise:

def process_up(self):
    try:
        call = subprocess.check_output("pgrep -f '{}'".format(self.processName), shell=True)
        return True
    except subprocess.CalledProcessError:
        return False

Now the code runs in ~2 seconds, but it's still too much

  • I'm very surprised subprocess performs faster for you than psutil! I just ran it and psutil always outperformed subprocess by far! (I tested it on colab) – Night Train Jul 9 at 12:31
  • You should use a loop instead of a comprehension for psutil.process_iter(). for your other approach use an f-string f"pgrep -f {self.pName}" or even better a list ["pgrep", "-f", "self.pName"]. Also preferably use subprocess.run(["pgrep", "-f", self.pName]).returncode which ran about 5% faster for me. – Night Train Jul 9 at 12:32
  • 1
    Which platforms are you targeting? – kmaork Jul 12 at 6:14
4
+50

Using pidof should be faster than pgrep

def process_up(self):
    try:
        call = subprocess.check_output("pidof '{}'".format(self.processName), shell=True)
        return True
    except subprocess.CalledProcessError:
        return False
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    It took a long time testing every solution people proposed. Yours was the fastest, thanks a lot! – kn0bbulo Jul 14 at 12:35
1

One option would be to centralise the checking, so that you go through the list of running processes just once for everything rather than once per monitored process.

monitored_processes = set(...)  # list of names of processes
running_processes = set(p.name() for p in psutil.process_iter())
missing_processes = monitored_processes - running_processes

You'd need a bit of extra code to do the retry, but that's also not too difficult:

missing_counts = Counter()

monitored_processes = set(...)  # list of names of processes

while True:
    running_processes = {p.name() for p in psutil.process_iter()}
    missing_processes = monitored_processes - running_processes

    for recovered_process in missing_counts.keys() - missing_processes:
        del missing_counts[recovered_process]

    for missing_process in missing_processes:
        missing_counts[missing_process] += 1

    down_processes = {
        down_process
        for down_process, count in missing_counts.items()
        if count > 3
    }
| improve this answer | |
0

According to psutil doc, the call to process_iter() is slow if called with default parameters.

What you need here is to provide the list of attributes you need.

For example you can replace:

psutil.process_iter())

by:

psutil.process_iter(['name','pid']))

Also, you can store the pid do something like this:

if my_pid in psutil.pids():
  # process still alive
| improve this answer | |
  • I tried using the parameters with process_iter, and then gave it a small test drive: with the parameters it's actually slower: it went from 0,05 secs to 0,08/0,09 – kn0bbulo Jul 13 at 7:38
0

If you are concerned about speed, why not use the os module? The os module provides the lowest level process routines and provides the most optimal performance over calling a shell executable. If you want something higher level, then consider the subprocess module.

import os
import sys
from time import sleep

def child_process():
    """
    Run your child process here
    """
    print("child process started..")
    sys.stdout.flush()
    # put your external process here
    sleep(10)
    os.execv("/bin/echo", ["I am a child process"])
    
    # should never get here!
    print("I am in a bad place! - child")
    os._exit(os.EX_SOFTWARE)

def process_up(pid):
    """
    Is the process up?
    :return: True if process is up
    """
    try:
        return None != os.waitpid(pid, os.WNOHANG)
    except ChildProcessError: # no child processes
        return False

def main():
    pid = os.fork()
    if pid == 0:
        child_process()
    else:
        # main thread
        # ...
        checks=0
        while process_up(pid):
             checks += 1
        print(f"Main: Process {pid} completed. {checks} checks in 10 seconds")
        # Example output:
        # Process 370 completed. 13307171 checks in 10 seconds.

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()
| improve this answer | |

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