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All I want to do is make the value of 'a' from second class negative each time change function is called from First class. I don't want to directly access the 'a' variable through the instance of second class. I want to change the value of 'a' only through a different class.

class First():
    def __init__(self):
        self.value = 1
        self.s = Second(self)

    def change(self):
        trigger = input("continue? y/n?")
        self.value *= -1
        print(self.value)
        print(self.s.a)
        if trigger == "y":
            self.change()

class Second():
    def __init__(self, num):
        self.a = num.value

f = First()
f.change()
  • Can you clarify your problem, or what you are trying to do? You can just assign to self.s.a. What do you mean by "I want to change the value of 'a' only through a different class."? There is no "different class" in your example. – MisterMiyagi Jul 6 at 16:31
  • self.a = num.value was a one-time event. You retrieved the value of num.value, as of that particular moment in time, and assigned it to self.a. You did NOT set up any sort of ongoing process that will keep the two values in sync. If you really can't just assign to self.s.a, you need for Second to retain a reference to num itself, and have a be a property that retrieves num.value every time it is referenced. – jasonharper Jul 6 at 16:42
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    @MisterMiyagi this is not my actual code. my actual code is really big and complex and i thought it will be too long to post here so i just simplified the part which wasn't working and put it up in this way so it will be easier for people to go through it and explain me what is wrong with it. – cybertron15 Jul 6 at 17:07
  • @jasonharper can u please show me how to do it programatically. a snippet a code will be really helpfull – cybertron15 Jul 6 at 17:09
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    I understand that this is simplified code (which is good) but it fails to demonstrate what you want to do (which is not good). Please edit your question describe more clearly what you want to do, possibly with short code to demonstrate which behaviour you desire. – MisterMiyagi Jul 6 at 17:41
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Make the Second class's a attribute a property that relies on a module level variable that the First class can change without going through the Second class.

class Thing:
    def __init__(self,val):
        self.val = val

class First():
    def __init__(self):
        self.value = 1
        self.s = Second()

    def change(self):
        trigger = input("continue? y/n?")
        self.value *= -1
        #print(self.value)
        #print(self.s.a)
        if trigger == "y":
            #self.change()
            num.val = -num.val

class Second():
    def __init__(self):
        #self.a = num.value
        pass
    @property
    def a(self):
        return num.val
    @a.setter
    def a(self,val):
        num.val = val

num = Thing(2)
f = First()
print(f'f.s.a = {f.s.a}')
f.change()
print(f'f.s.a = {f.s.a}')

That solution would make all Second instances have the same num, therfore the same a.

Maybe you meant for each Second instance to have its own unique a.

class Thing:
    def __init__(self,val):
        self.val = val

d = {}

class First():
    def __init__(self):
        self.value = 1
        self.s = Second(2)

    def change(self):
        trigger = input("continue? y/n?")
        self.value *= -1
        #print(self.value)
        #print(self.s.a)
        if trigger == "y":
            #self.change()
            d[self.s].val = d[self.s].val * -1

class Second():
    def __init__(self,val):
        num = Thing(val)
        d[self] = num
    @property
    def a(self):
        return d[self].val
    @a.setter
    def a(self,val):
        d[self].val = val

f = First()
print(f'f.s.a = {f.s.a}')
f.change()
print(f'f.s.a = {f.s.a}')
| improve this answer | |
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    Why add the extra d? Why not use self.num.val instead of d[self].val? – MisterMiyagi Jul 6 at 18:18
  • @MisterMiyagi In the second solution, the dictionary will (should?) hold a separate instance of Thing for each instance of Second so that each Second instance can have a distinct a - unlike the first solution in my answer. – wwii Jul 6 at 18:21
  • @MisterMiyagi - I'm not confident either meets the OP's requirements - we'll see. – wwii Jul 6 at 18:22
  • But each Second can already have a distinct instance of Thing via an attribute, such as self._num = hing(val). What is the benefit of using one global, external dictionary to hold state that each instance's internal dictionary could hold as well? – MisterMiyagi Jul 6 at 18:52
  • @MisterMiyagi ... Ahh well IIUC the OP wants to change the a attribute in Second instances without accessing the attribute through the instance - so I figured the First instance need to manipulate a module level variable/thing the the Second instance relies on for its attribute - hope that made as much sense as the question. – wwii Jul 6 at 19:14

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