17

I would like to have a template class (e.g. float/double type), but I am using Nvidia CUDA and OptiX and have multiple other types (e.g. float2, double2, float3,...) that depend on the chosen template type.

Something like this:

#include <optixu/optixu_vector_types.h>
#include <type_traits>

template <class T>
class MyClass 
{
   MyClass()
   {
      if (std::is_same<T, float>::value) 
      {
         typedef optix::float2 T2;
      }
      else if (std::is_same<T, double>::value)
      {
         typedef optix::double2 T2;
      }

      T2 my_T2_variable;
   }

   void SomeFunction() 
   { 
      T2 another_T2_variable; 
   };
};

My solution for now is to have multiple template arguments MyClass<T,T2,T3> my_object;, but this seems to have too much overhead and clutter. Is there a way to achieve the same with a single template argument as desired above?

20

Typically you'd do this by creating a trait type whose specializations define the additional types. For example:

// Base template is undefined.
template <typename T>
struct optix_traits;

template <>
struct optix_traits<float> {
    using dim2 = optix::float2;
    // etc
};

template <>
struct optix_traits<double> {
    using dim2 = optix::double2;
    // etc
};

Then you can alias from these types to a name in your type, if desired:

template <typename T>
class MyClass {
public:
    using T2 = typename optix_traits<T>::dim2;
};
| improve this answer | |
  • That worked. Thanks. On a minor note: I just noticed that I have private member functions that return T2/T3 and it throws an error about the unkown (return) type T2? E.g. T2 MyClass<T>::Foo(){return my_T2_variable;} Can this be resolved somehow? Or shall I post a new question? – SemtexB Jul 7 at 8:07
  • 2
    @SemtexB An out-of-class member function definition is not "in scope" until after it knows what type the member belongs to. When it sees T2 there it doesn't know what T2 is because it doesn't know the method is in MyClass<T> yet. Spell it all out: template <typename T> typename MyClass<T>::T2 MyClass<T>::Foo() { ... } Since C++11 you can also use auto to move the return type, like this: template <typename T> auto MyClass<T>::Foo() -> T2 { ... }. Since the return type appears after MyClass<T>:: in that case, it knows to look in MyClass<T> for it. – cdhowie Jul 7 at 8:09
  • Perfect, that worked. Thanks for the fast reply. I tried template <typename T> MyClass::T2 MyClass<T>::Foo() { ... }, but forgot the typename keyword and template argument...doh! – SemtexB Jul 7 at 8:20
  • 1
    Summary: whereas all templates are meta-functions, type traits are the specific idiom we use when we want to define them more-or-less by enumerating all the possibilities, and where the outputs of the function(s) are a bunch of "facts" about the type (or you can call them properties or traits of the type). So, a simple mapping from a list of types to a list of other types pretty much is a type trait whether you think to name it that or not. – Steve Jessop Jul 7 at 16:34
13

You can use std::conditional, from <type_traits>.

If you want the T2 be optix::float2 when T == float and otherwise optix::double2, use std::conditional. This is availble since and will resolve the type T2 at compile time.

#include <type_traits>  // std::conditional, std::is_same

template <class T>
class MyClass
{
    using T2 = typename std::conditional<std::is_same<T, float>::value,
                                          optix::float2, optix::double2>::type;
    T2 my_T2_variable;

    // ... other code
};

(See demo)


As @HikmatFarhat pointed out, std::conditional will not catch the user mistakes. It checks only the first condition, and for the false case gives the type optix::double2.

Another option is series of SFINAE ed functions, and decltype to those for the T2 as follows:

#include <type_traits>  // std::is_same, std::enable_if

template <class T> // uses if T == float and return `optix::float2`
auto typeReturn() -> typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<float, T>::value, optix::float2>::type { return {}; }

template <class T> // uses if T == double and return `optix::double2`
auto typeReturn() -> typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<double, T>::value, optix::double2>::type { return {}; }

template <class T>
class MyClass
{
    using T2 = decltype(typeReturn<T>()); // chooses the right function!

    T2 my_T2_variable;

    // ... other codes
};

(See demo)

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    yes but if he makes a mistake std::conditional will not catch it. For example calling it with std::string it defaults to optix::double2. Whereas the type_trait solution will give an error. – Hikmat Farhat Jul 7 at 8:23
  • 3
    @HikmatFarhat You are right. Added another option, which is similar to the type_trait solutions and should cover the issue. – JeJo Jul 7 at 8:44
5

Implement a meta-function using template specialization that maps standard C++ types to OptiX types with the desired "rank":

template <typename T, std::size_t N> struct optix_type;

template <> struct optix_type<float, 2> { using type = optix::float2; };
template <> struct optix_type<float, 3> { using type = optix::float3; };
template <> struct optix_type<double, 2> { using type = optix::double2; };
// ...

template <typename T, std::size_t N>
using optix_type_t = typename optix_type<T, N>::type;

You can then use this within your class(es) to easily get the right types:

template <class T>
class MyClass {
  using T2 = optix_type_t<T, 2>;
  MyClass() {
    T2 my_T2_variable;
    optix_type_t<T, 3> my_T3_variable;
  }
  void SomeFunction() { T2 another_T2_variable; };
};
| improve this answer | |

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