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I was looking for a way to set the Quaternions (x, y, z, w) through the inspector window. We get all these variables when we click on "Debug" mode in Unity. Through Unity docs, I got to know that these values are between 0-1. So how do we set for angles such as 90,-90,180,-180,270,.... MAIN THING here is that I want to set the target rotations in the script of this game object so that the gameObject moves from initial rotation to target rotation. For example in "Normal" window, if I set the target rotation of x as 180 (shown as -5.008956e-06 in the inspector window), the gameObject moves from 0 to -180, instead of +180. That is the reason I moved to "Debug" window thinking it helps here to set it. But the values here range between 0-1, so does anyone have an idea of how to calculate this?

Moreover, for rotation I am using this one line:

transform.localRotation = Quaternion.Slerp(transform.localRotation, targetRotation, Time.deltaTime * RotationSpeed);

enter image description here

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    Why do you want to set the quaternions directly? It shouldn't be needed, can you add to your question what it is you want to achieve? Quaternions work with very complex maths and shouldn't ever be set directly unless you understand them completely (which judging from the question you don't) as also pointed out in the quaternions docs. You can use the function Quaternion.Euler(); to feed in eulerangles and Unity will calculate the quaternions for you, which is all anyone should ever need in 99,9% of cases – Remy Jul 7 '20 at 9:56
  • Thank you for your reply. What I want to achieve here is that I want the gameObject to rotate from its initial rotation to its final rotation. – user11458208 Jul 7 '20 at 10:02
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    @Saif what is wrong doing it using a public Vector3 targetRotationV3; and apply it to var targetRotation = Quaternion.Euler(targetRotationV3); ? Still anyway: Don't Slerp using Time.deltaTime .. it makes little sense in this case ... rather use a constant factor of e.g. 0.5f ... – derHugo Jul 7 '20 at 10:04
  • @derHugo Thank you but I don't follow you. What do you mean by constant factor and if I use Euler, it tells me float is not allowed. Could you please explain with an example? – user11458208 Jul 7 '20 at 10:09
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It sounds like you want to be able to adjust it via a Vector3 just how Unity does it in the Transform Inspector. You could do something like

public Vector3 targetRotationV3;

private Quaternion targetRotation;

private void Start()
{
    targetRotation = Quaternion.Euler(targetRotationV3);
}

or if you need to be more flexible

private void Update()
{
    targetRotation = Quaternion.Euler(targetRotationV3);

    ...
}
    

Then for my comment what I mean is that Slerp interpolates a value between the first and the second argument using the factor between 0 and 1.

Since you every frame use a new value as start point, namely the current rotation, this will get slower and slower to the end and depending on your given speed never reach the target rotation.

It makes little sense to use Time.deltaTime here which just divides your speed by about 60 (for 60 FPS). Usually you rather want a constant interpolation factor between 0 and 1. If the frame-rate goes up it might even rotate back since in this case the Time.deltaTime would get smaller!

So you either rather want a constant interpolation factor

[Range(0f,1f)] private float slerpFactor = 0.5f;

private void Update()
{
    targetRotation = Quaternion.Euler(targetRotationV3);

    transform.localRotation = Quaternion.Slerp(transform.localRotation, targetRotation, slerpFactor);
}

or if you want to rotate with a constant speed instead use Quaternion.RotateTowards

private void Update()
{
    targetRotation = Quaternion.Euler(targetRotationV3);

    transform.localRotation = Quaternion.RotateTowards(transform.localRotation, targetRotation, Time.deltaTime * RotationSpeed);
}

where your RotationSpeed is now in ° / second

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  • Perfect!! so the common solution is never to set Quaternions via inspector window and rather use Vector3 and then convert it to Quaternion using Quaternion.Euler() function. Also I understood the slerpFactor now :) – user11458208 Jul 7 '20 at 10:27
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As I said in my comment, don't set Quaternion directly ever, unless you are really confident in your understanding of them, as pointed out in the unity docs (emphasis mine).

They are based on complex numbers and are not easy to understand intuitively. You almost never access or modify individual Quaternion components (x,y,z,w); most often you would just take existing rotations (e.g. from the Transform) and use them to construct new rotations (e.g. to smoothly interpolate between two rotations). The Quaternion functions that you use 99% of the time are: Quaternion.LookRotation, Quaternion.Angle, Quaternion.Euler, Quaternion.Slerp, Quaternion.FromToRotation, and Quaternion.identity. (The other functions are only for exotic uses.)

Rather what you want to do is set the initial and target rotations as Vector3 (Eulerangles) from the inspector and use the build in Quaternion.Euler(); method to let Unity figure out the transformation from Eulerangles to Quaternions.

This would look something like this (Note that I am doing this in an update for the example, and using a float time that I update from the inspector to change the rotation, this is just done for ease of example and not the best way to do implement the t parameter of Quaternion.Slerp):

public Vector3 initialrotation;
public Vector3 targetRotation;
public float time;

void Update()
{
    // Let Unity figure out what the appropriate Quaternions are for the given Eulerangles
    // Note that this can better be done in Start if initialRotation and targetRotation never change. Just put it here for simplicity
    var initialQuaternion = Quaternion.Euler(initialrotation); 
    var targetQuaternion = Quaternion.Euler(targetRotation);

    var slerp = Quaternion.Slerp(initialQuaternion, targetQuaternion, time);
    transform.rotation = slerp;
}
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  • Thanks alot! I will never set Quaternions via inspector window. It is better to use as Vector3. Did not know it would be that complex. – user11458208 Jul 7 '20 at 10:25

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