58

If I have a list say l = [1, 8, 8, 8, 1, 3, 3, 8] and it's guaranteed that every element occurs an even number of times, how do I make a list with all elements of l now occurring n/2 times. So since 1 occurred 2 times, it should now occur once. Since 8 occurs 4 times, it should now occur twice. Since 3 occurred twice, it should occur once.

So the new list will be something like k=[1,8,8,3]

What is the fastest way to do this? I did list.count() for every element but it was very slow.

  • 44
    did you try sorting and then just taking the odd position elements? – Gokul Jul 8 at 11:19
  • 11
    You should specify whether order of any kind is important. – chrylis -cautiouslyoptimistic- Jul 9 at 6:08
  • 27
    That sounds a bit like homework assignment ... – JensG Jul 9 at 12:23
  • 2
    Technically, hashing (O(n)) is faster than sorting (O(n log n) beyond some point. – RBarryYoung Jul 9 at 17:58
  • 2
    What an odd question! Does it come from real life or is it purely academic? – Daemon Painter Jul 9 at 18:54

13 Answers 13

99

If order isn't important, a way would be to get the odd or even indexes only after a sort. Those lists will be the same so you only need one of them.

l = [1,8,8,8,1,3,3,8]
l.sort()

# Get all odd indexes
odd = l[1::2]

# Get all even indexes
even = l[::2]

print(odd)
print(odd == even)

Result:

[1, 3, 8, 8]
True
| improve this answer | |
  • 7
    @NePt understand slice notation – Patrick Artner Jul 8 at 11:33
  • 2
    To be honest, I did not benchmark it. But I suppose a sort is faster than a count on a list. – Wimanicesir Jul 8 at 11:46
  • 7
    @Wimanicesir I doubt that. Sorting is O(n log n), counting should just be O(n), albeit with a (probably) higher constant factor. – ApproachingDarknessFish Jul 8 at 21:57
  • 1
    @Wimanicesir See test in my answer. Yours wins timing test when order is not important. Mine wins when order is important. Congrats. Clever approach. – jpf Jul 9 at 0:41
  • 1
    @Wimanicesir why not starting from the first element with list[::2]? Also since this answer is getting attention you might want to rename the variable so that it does not shadow the python built-in. – Ma0 Jul 9 at 11:58
28

Use a counter to keep track of the count of each element

from collections import Counter
l = [1,8,8,8,1,3,3,8]
res = []
count = Counter(l) # its like dict(1: 2, 8: 4, 3: 2)
for key, val in count.items():
    res.extend(val//2 * [key])
print(res)
# output
[1, 8, 8, 3]
| improve this answer | |
  • If you make the list [1,8,3,8,8,1,3,8], the output for this will be [1, 8, 8, 3] instead of [1, 8, 3, 8]. Or at least that's what I assume the output should be based on the example in the question. – Bernhard Barker Jul 8 at 20:39
  • @BernhardBarker the order will be determined by the first time a number is encountered in the list, because in the latest versions of Python dicts are ordered by insertion order. Unless Counter doesn't use an actual dict. – Mark Ransom Jul 8 at 21:45
  • @MarkRansom So it will be [1,8,8,3] like Bernhard said – user253751 Jul 9 at 14:56
  • @user253751 the same comment was left on two answers, but I never saw a form of either answer with the other outcome so I had trouble knowing why that comment was left. Mine was really just a clarification of the mechanics for the curious. – Mark Ransom Jul 9 at 15:15
  • @MarkRansom I suspect, based on the given example, that [4,2,5,2] (instead of the [4,2,2,5] this answer would give) is the correct output for [4,2,5,2,2,4,5,2]. This is based on taking the first half of elements of each value and keeping them in the same relative order. However, it could also be the case that it should be ordered by the position of the first element of each value, as this answer does, or that order isn't important at all. Only the asker can say for sure (based on the accepted answer, I guess order doesn't matter). Explaining what code in an answer does is useful though. – Bernhard Barker Jul 9 at 19:02
20

Since you guarantee that each element of the list occurs a multiple of 2, then it is faster to build the counter as you build the output list, rather than building a counter (or sort) first and using it later.

l = [1,8,8,8,1,3,3,8]
count={}
res=[]
for i in l:
  if i in count: count[i]+=1
  else: count[i]=1
  if count[i]%2: res.append(i)

print(res)

Output

[1,8,8,3]

EDIT Comparing time/expense of each method

Using the timeit module shows that this approach is 2.7 times faster than using a counter first.

i.e.

def one():
  l = [1,8,8,8,1,3,3,8]
  count={}
  res=[]
  for i in l:
    if i in count: count[i]+=1
    else: count[i]=1
    if count[i]%2: res.append(i)

  #print(res)


def two():
  from collections import Counter
  l = [1,8,8,8,1,3,3,8]
  res = []
  count = Counter(l) # its like dict(1: 2, 8: 4, 3: 2)
  for key, val in count.items():
    res.extend(val//2 * [key])

o=timeit.Timer(one)

t=timeit.Timer(two)

print(o.timeit(100000))

print(t.timeit(100000))

print(o.timeit(100000))

print(t.timeit(100000))

Output (seconds)

0.28666
0.80822
0.28678
0.80113

If order isn't important, then Wimanicesir's method would be preferred with 4x greater speedup, with result of 0.07037 (~11 times faster than with counter approach).

UPDATE I suspected that using the Counter method in two (unordered) may come with significant bloat or slow down in import, so I tested the "count first, compile result later" method while counting with the simple method here from one (ordered)

count={}
for i in l:
  if i in count: count[i]+=1
  else: count[i]=1

which was much faster than Counter. Replacing Counter in two of the tests defined resulted in a time of 0.31 instead of 0.80. Still slightly faster to compile (ordered) result during counting as in two, however. And much faster for unordered result to use Wimanicesir's method.

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    Due to the sort operation, @Wimanicesir's method runs in O(n log(n)) time, but the two methods you propose here run in O(n) time, so they ought to be faster. – snibbets Jul 9 at 11:56
  • If the question is a designed exercise rather than a problem that arose in the wild, it's probable IMO that the expected answer is basically this, but perhaps using a set rather than a dictionary. If the element is absent, emit it and add it. If the element is present, remove it and do nothing. This will use a bit less memory, and for some inputs would use a lot less memory, than the dictionary. But I wouldn't count on it to be faster, since the structural changes to the set might well be slower than just incrementing a dictionary entry. – Steve Jessop Jul 9 at 17:47
  • It also motivates the guarantee, " every element occurs an even number of times": if there are no elements without a matching pair later on, then you don't have to worry about emitting things as soon as you see them. – Steve Jessop Jul 9 at 17:47
  • 2
    No lpf, to test if a key exists, a hash can be taken of the key and this is used to find the key in the table. Even if the key does not exist, the code can still quickly determine that it is not in the hash table. I suggest running the experiment yourself. I generated 10 million items in an array (range of values from 0 to 10**6, duplicated and shuffled the array and then tried both methods. With a Counter it took 11.0 s, sorting the array first according to @Wimanicesir's method took 15.8 s. – snibbets Jul 12 at 23:17
  • 2
    @jpf, as the number of elements grows I would expect the Counter method to be the faster option. I suggest trying both approaches with 20 million elements or more. As my results showed above, the sorting method was 44% slower with this many elements, and I would expect the difference to increase as the number of elements grows. – snibbets Jul 14 at 15:28
19

This is a classic use case of sets and I'm quite surprised that no one else tried it out to see how it stacks against the Counter and dict implementations.

I implemented a solution using set instead as follows:

def set_impl(l):
  bag = set()
  res = []
  for i in l:
    if i in bag:
      res.append(i)
      bag.remove(i)
    else:
      bag.add(i)

This implementation is about 28% faster than using Counter and 51% faster than using a dictionary.

The sort and slice implementation given by Wimanicesir is the fastest, giving results 17 times faster than when using set. Note though, that because it sorts the items before removing duplicates, the order of appearance is not preserved unlike the other three.

Here are all the suggested implementations with timing for evaluation of comparative performance.
https://repl.it/@franzalex/StackOverflow-py#removeDuplicateHalf.py

import random
import statistics as stats
from collections import Counter as counter
from timeit import Timer

def slice_impl(l):
  l.sort()
  res = l[::2]

def dict_impl(l):
  count={}
  res=[]
  for i in l:
    if i in count:
      count[i] += 1
    else:
      count[i] = 1
    if count[i] % 2:
      res.append(i)

def counter_impl(l):
  count = counter(l)
  res = []
  for key, val in count.items():
    res.extend(val//2 * [key])

def set_impl(l):
  bag = set()
  res = []
  for i in l:
    if i in bag:
      res.append(i)
      bag.remove(i)
    else:
      bag.add(i)

def timed_run():
  for name, func in {"Sort and Slice": slice_impl, 
                     "Dictionary": dict_impl, 
                     "Counter": counter_impl, 
                     "Set": set_impl}.items():
    seq = list(range(50))*2
    results = []
    print(f"{name} Implementation Results")
    for i in range(50):
      if len(results) % 10: random.shuffle(seq) # shuffle after 10 runs
      results.append(Timer(lambda: func(seq)).timeit(10**4))
      # print(f"Run {i+1:02}: {results[i]:.6f}")
    print("")
    print(f"Median:  {stats.median(results):.6f}")
    print(f"Mean:    {stats.mean(results):.6f}")
    print(f"Std Dev: {stats.stdev(results):.6f}")
    print("\n\n")

timed_run()

Sample run result

Sort and Slice Implementation Results

Median:  0.009686
Mean:    0.009721
Std Dev: 0.000529


Dictionary Implementation Results

Median:  0.230081
Mean:    0.227631
Std Dev: 0.014584


Counter Implementation Results

Median:  0.192730
Mean:    0.194577
Std Dev: 0.008015


Set Implementation Results

Median:  0.149604
Mean:    0.151227
Std Dev: 0.006838
| improve this answer | |
  • There are a few problems with this benchmark. For one, you only shuffle the list every ten iterations, so the sort algorithm gets an easy run 9 out of 10 times (TimSort is Ω(n) on already sorted lists). Moreover, your list has only 50 elements. The three algorithms based on hash maps/sets have a complexity of Ω(n), while the sort-based approach has a complexity of Ω(n log n). The difference will only matter for really big lists. It's unlikely that these problems change anything about your conclusion, though – I doubt it's practical to run this on a list big enough to make sort slower. – Sven Marnach Aug 3 at 13:50
  • @SvenMarnach: Mine's the only one that's throwing in a degree of complexity to affect the performance. Granted, shuffling a list of 50 items after every 10th iteration may not be much but just as you said, the real difference in performance can only be seen in very large sets which may not be very practical to use as demonstration here. That said, without having looked at the implementation of each of the hash-based data structures, it looks like the set trumps the other two based on the limitations of the tests I ran. – Alex Essilfie Aug 5 at 23:40
7

Instead of using a counter, which keeps track of an integer for each possible element of the list, try mapping elements to booleans using a dictionary. Map to true the first time they're seen, and then every time after that flip the bit, and if it's true skip the element.

| improve this answer | |
  • This is very memory efficient. Note that you have to revert back to false after each 2nd occurrence (or remove them from the map altogether; this depends on whether your elements are sparse or not.) – Artelius Jul 9 at 4:06
  • 1
    This would be my approach. If the element value was reasonably limited (under 100,000 or so) just use a bit array. Otherwise use a hash table. Copy the elements one at a time from source list to output list, copying or not based on the bit array. Order N. – Hot Licks Jul 9 at 18:13
  • 1
    I like this answer, but I feel it needs an accompanying example. – Shaun Cockerill Jul 22 at 1:34
  • 1
    This is like recreating the functionality of sets using a dict or bitarray. In Python it is likely to be faster simply to use a set. – Stuart Jul 23 at 22:21
3

If you are not concerned about preserving relative order, you can first get a count of each element using collections.Counter, then create a new list with each element duplicated half as many times.

>>> from collections import Counter
>>> from itertools import chain
>>> list(chain.from_iterable([key]*(count//2) for key, count in Counter(l).items()))
[1, 8, 8, 3]
| improve this answer | |
3

you keep a list of all items that have been visited an uneven number of times. then you iterate over all list items.

in other langauges would probably use some map() or filter() method, but here is some simple code since i don't know python well enough! :)

l = [1,8,8,8,1,3,3,8]
seen = []
result = []
for num in l:
  if num in seen:
    seen.remove(num)
    #result.append(num) #print every even appearance
  else:
    seen.append(num)
    result.append(num) #print every odd appearance

if len(seen)==0:
  print(result)
else:
  print("Error: uneven elements found:", seen)

at the end the visited-array should be empty, so you can use that as a sanity check before returning the result-array.

edit: here's a version with filter that returns the odd appearances

l = [1,8,8,8,1,3,3,8]
seen = []
result = list(filter(lambda x: seen.append(x) is None if x not in seen else not seen.remove(x) is None, l))

if len(seen)==0:
  print(result)
else:
  print("Error: uneven elements found:", seen)

and this one returns the even appearances:

l = [1,8,8,8,1,3,3,8]
seen = []
result = list(filter(lambda x: seen.remove(x) is None if x in seen else not seen.append(x) is None, l))

if len(seen)==0:
  print(result)
else:
  print("Error: uneven elements found:", seen)
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Hello, and welcome to SO! Not sure about the downvote, probably due to the answer being extremely over-engineered for the task at hand. Please, do take a good habit of benchmark and post timings when the user asks for "what is the fastest". – Daemon Painter Jul 9 at 18:58
1

I like using a trie set, as you need to detect duplicates to remove them, or a big hash set (lots of buckets). The trie does not go unbalanced and you do not need to know the size of the final set. An alternative is a very parallel sort -- brute force.

| improve this answer | |
0

I know this has been answered and there are some quite lengthy solutions. And it specifically mentioned Python. However, I thought a Powershell solution might be interesting (and simple!) for some:

Version 1 (grouping items - less efficient)

$OriginalArray = @("1","8","8","8","1","3","3","8") 
$NewArray = New-ObjectSystem.Collections.ArrayList
$ArrayGroup = $OriginalArray | Group-Object | Select-Object Count,Name

ForEach ($EachNumber in $ArrayGroup) {
    $HalfTheCount = (1..([Math]::Round($EachNumber.Count / 2)))
    ForEach ($Item in $HalfTheCount) {$NewArray.Add($EachNumber.Name) | Out-Null}   
    } 
$NewArray

Version 2 (picking every other item from a sorted array - more efficient)

$OriginalArray = @("1","8","8","8","1","3","3","8") 

$NewArray = New-Object System.Collections.ArrayList

$OddOrEven = "Even"
ForEach ($SortedItem in ($OriginalArray | Sort-Object)) {
    If ($OddOrEven -eq "Even") {$NewArray.Add($SortedItem);$EvenNumber = $True}
    If ($OddOrEven -eq "Odd") {$EvenNumber = $False}
    If ($EvenNumber -eq $True) {$OddOrEven = "Odd"} Else {$OddOrEven = "Even"} 
}
$NewArray
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Your implementation is very inefficient. You are first grouping everything and counting the number per group, then you are 'generating' the correct number of elements via an intermediate array and then you are building a new array. Powershell is fine, just try to implement the same algorithm as the top answer suggest. – Dalibor Čarapić Jul 23 at 9:09
  • Fair enough - I've just added a script based on sorting and selecting every other item. The reason I did it by grouping originally is that you have flexibility to roundup/down if you have elements with an odd number of entries. Also, it was just a quick bit of code ;) – Andy Pyne Jul 24 at 11:09
-1
import itertools

st=time.time()
lst = [1,8,8,8,1,3,3,8]
list(itertools.chain.from_iterable(itertools.repeat(x, int(lst.count(x)/2)) for x in list(set(lst)) if lst.count(x)%2==0))

This gives sorted list

| improve this answer | |
-1

If the order matters, following code can work with O(N):

import collections
c = collections.Counter(l)
c2 = collections.Counter()
i, n = 0, len(l)
res=[]
for x in l:
    if i == n//2:break
    if c2[x] < c[x] // 2:
        res.append(x)
        c2[x] += 1
        i += 1
| improve this answer | |
-2

Maybe this.

    newList = []
    for number in l:
        if(newList.count(number) < l.count(number)/2):
            newList.append(number)

print(newList)
| improve this answer | |
-2

You can use dictionary to maintain value and its count. Every time you iterate array check value and divide its count by 2 and store this key count/2 times. Making dictionary will have single pass through array and so It should be faster than your method.

| improve this answer | |

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