48

I'm trying to understand exceptions in Ruby but I'm a little confused. The tutorial I'm using says that if an exception occurs that does not match any of the exceptions identified by the rescue statements, you can use an "else" to catch it:

begin  
# -  
rescue OneTypeOfException  
# -  
rescue AnotherTypeOfException  
# -  
else  
# Other exceptions
ensure
# Always will be executed
end

However, I also saw later in the tutorial "rescue" being used without an exception specified:

begin
    file = open("/unexistant_file")
    if file
         puts "File opened successfully"
    end
rescue
    file = STDIN
end
print file, "==", STDIN, "\n"

If you can do this, then do I ever need to use else? Or can I just use a generic rescue at the end like this?

begin  
# -  
rescue OneTypeOfException  
# -  
rescue AnotherTypeOfException  
# -  
rescue
# Other exceptions
ensure
# Always will be executed
end
  • 4
    What's the tutorial, so I know not to recommend it? – Andrew Grimm Jun 8 '11 at 23:42
  • 4
    @AndrewGrimm After some Googling, I think the tutorial the asker was following was tutorialspoint.com/ruby/ruby_exceptions.htm. Bonus WTF: the author of that tutorial seems to have plagiarised the first example from rubylearning.com/satishtalim/ruby_exceptions.html (where it was already incorrect), but made it worse still by screwing up the indentation of the comments. And yes, I think it'd be wise to steer people away from it - what a great combination of incompetence and dishonesty on display! – Mark Amery Dec 9 '15 at 19:51
  • Just in the case somebody encounters this same issue. In "The Ruby Way. Third Edition" the authors state that an else clause inside a begin block is used to rescue errors of a type not specified in the preceeding rescue clauses (Basically the same that the tutorial from this question said). That is incorrect. It confused me for a while – gasc Oct 1 '18 at 22:31
90

The else is for when the block completes without an exception thrown. The ensure is run whether the block completes successfully or not. Example:

begin
  puts "Hello, world!"
rescue
  puts "rescue"
else
  puts "else"
ensure
  puts "ensure"
end

This will print Hello, world!, then else, then ensure.

  • 2
    Why include the else portion in the begin block? – Antarr Byrd Jul 28 '15 at 16:50
  • @AntarrByrd In Ruby, begin is like try in other languages. The else, here, means, do this if no exceptions have been thrown in that begin (try) block. – Chris Jester-Young Jul 28 '15 at 16:52
  • But if the code in the begin block does not throw an error. You can continue there since thats the only case in which it will run. – Antarr Byrd Jul 28 '15 at 16:54
  • 6
    @AntarrByrd With one difference: the exception handlers will be disabled in the else (while still being run before the ensure). – Chris Jester-Young Jul 28 '15 at 17:17
  • Cool thanks for the clarity. – Antarr Byrd Jul 28 '15 at 17:25
5

Here's a concrete use-case for else in a begin expression. Suppose you're writing automated tests, and you want to write a method that returns the error raised by a block. But you also want the test to fail if the block doesn't raise an error. You can do this:

def get_error_from(&block)
  begin
    block.call
  rescue => err
    err  # we want to return this
  else
    raise "No error was raised"
  end
end

Note that you can't move the raise inside the begin block, because it'll get rescued. Of course, there are other ways without using else, like checking whether err is nil after the end, but that's not as succinct.

Personally, I rarely use else in this way because I think it's rarely needed, but it does come in handy in those rare cases.

EDIT

Another use case occurred to me. Here's a typical begin/rescue:

begin
  do_something_that_may_raise_argument_error
  do_something_else_when_the_previous_line_doesnt_raise
rescue ArgumentError => e
  handle_the_error
end

Why is this less than ideal? Because the intent is to rescue when do_something_that_may_raise_argument_error raises ArgumentError, not when do_something_else_when_the_previous_line_doesnt_raise raises.

It's usually better to use begin/rescue to wrap the minimum code you want to protect from a raise, because otherwise:

  • you may mask bugs in the code that wasn't supposed to raise
  • the intention of rescue is harder to decipher. Someone (including your future self) may read the code and wonder "Which expression did I want to protect? It looks like expression ABC... but maybe expression DEF too???? What was the author intending?!" Refactoring becomes much more difficult.

You avoid those problems with this simple change:

begin
  do_something_that_may_raise_argument_error
rescue ArgumentError => e
  handle_the_error
else
  do_something_else_when_the_previous_line_doesnt_raise
end
  • Why couldn't you just raise "No error was raised" after the begin rescue end block? Wouldn't that be exactly the same as doing it inside that else? – Magne Mar 6 '17 at 8:53
  • @Magne The only way that would work is if you also use an early return, i.e. return err instead of just err. If you don't, the method can't return the block's error because you have an unconditional raise at the end of the method. I usually try to avoid early/explicit returns (except in guard-clause-style) because it's easier to follow; which is why the else syntax is more appealing. – Kelvin Mar 6 '17 at 17:21
  • ah, I didn't notice that the begin rescue end was inside a method where you want to return the error. But, consider my question if you don't need to return the error (ie. a standalone begin rescue end). – Magne Mar 7 '17 at 10:10
  • I guess it would only be the same if you do something to halt execution from within the rescue block (like re-raising the error). In that case the else would be superflous. – Magne Mar 7 '17 at 10:12
1

The else block in a begin rescue end block is used when you are perhaps expecting an exception of some sort to occur. If you run through all of your expected exceptions but still have nothing raised, then in your else block you can do whatever's needed now that you know that your original code ran error free.

0

The only reason I can see for the else block is if you want to execute something before the ensure block when the code in the begin block didn't raise any errors.

begin
  puts "Hello"
rescue
  puts "Error"
else
  puts "Success"
ensure
  puts "my old friend"
  puts "I've come to talk with you again."
end
0

Thanks to else you sometimes can merge two nested begin end blocks.
So (simplified example from my current code) instead of:

  begin
    html = begin
      NetHTTPUtils.request_data url
    rescue NetHTTPUtils::Error => e
      raise unless 503 == e.code
      sleep 60
      retry
    end
    redo unless html["market"]
  end

you write:

  begin
    html = NetHTTPUtils.request_data url
  rescue NetHTTPUtils::Error => e
    raise unless 503 == e.code
    sleep 60
    retry
  else
    redo unless html["market"]
  end

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