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I'm watching a C# course and I've just seen a strange usage of bool inside a parameter.

I'll show a screenshot of it:

enter image description here

What does that mean? I've never seen anything like this before.

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    Please do not share screenshots of code, instead properly format and embed it into the question using Markdown – MindSwipe Jul 9 at 11:58
  • @MindSwipe I'm sorry, but it is a video course, so I don't have the code written. That's why I attached a screenshot. – Octavian Niculescu Jul 9 at 11:59
  • This is more typically used when there are multiple defaulted/optional parameters and you only want to set a few (vs. being required to get all of them up to the one you want in the correct position). – crashmstr Jul 9 at 11:59
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    You are looking for Named Arguments – Bill Tür Jul 9 at 12:01
  • Thanks to both of you. I have a question though - why did the course creator choose to use this approach when using only one parameter? – Octavian Niculescu Jul 9 at 12:04
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It is a named parameter or argument introduced in C# 4 / Framework 4.0 / Visual Studio 2010:

Named arguments free you from the need to remember or to look up the order of parameters in the parameter lists of called methods. The parameter for each argument can be specified by parameter name. For example, a function that prints order details (such as, seller name, order number & product name) can be called in the standard way by sending arguments by position, in the order defined by the function.

Named and Optional Arguments (C# Programming Guide)

| improve this answer | |
  • Yes. I get it now. I have a question though - why did the course creator choose to use this approach when using only one parameter? – Octavian Niculescu Jul 9 at 12:03
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    That question you have to ask the course creator. :-) – SomeBody Jul 9 at 12:05
  • Perhaps to introduce the concept, but indeed, it would be better with two params... else it's worthless. – Olivier Rogier Jul 9 at 12:08

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