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Hi so in unity I am trying to make this really rough text system right now just placeholder because I am making a prototype. Now it is saying Only assignment, call, increment, decrement, await, and new object expressions can be used as a statement and I don't know what I have done wrong here is the main code:

public GameObject text;

private bool TextVis = false;

void Start()
{
    text.SetActive(false);
}

void OnTriggerEnter2D(Collider2D other)
{
    if(other.tag == "Player")
    {
        text.SetActive(true);
        TextVis == true;
    }
    else if(other.tag != "Player" && TextVis == true)
    {
        text.SetActive(false);
        TextVis == false;
    }
}

}

  • 2
    On Stackoverflow we don't modify title to (FIXED) or anything. We upvote useful and accept correct (best) answers. See tour. – Sinatr Jul 10 at 7:09
3

Just some mistakes in the assignments of TextVis. Do you mean,

public GameObject text;

private bool TextVis = false;

void Start()
{
    text.SetActive(false);
}

void OnTriggerEnter2D(Collider2D other)
{
    if(other.tag == "Player")
    {
        text.SetActive(true);
        TextVis = true;
    }
    else if(other.tag != "Player" && TextVis == true)
    {
        text.SetActive(false);
        TextVis = false;
    }
}

Actually, instead of using a boolean flag, you can access a GameObject's activeness via text.activeInHierarchy.

| improve this answer | |
3

Change

TextVis == true;

so that it uses only one = like you did at the top:

TextVis = true;
  • = is for assignment (set a variable value),
  • == is for comparison (compare a variable value).

The error comes because you can't write a comparison on a line on its own - if c# allowed it, it would do the comparison and then throw the result away, meaning it's a useless operation and hence must be an error

The compiler message is a bit cryptic, but in essence it means "this statement must be wrong; double check it"

-

Also wanted to point out that there isn't any point having a variable threat is a Boolean, and comparing it with a Boolean to get a Boolean result:

if(TextVis == true)

Is the same as:

if(TextVis)

Comparing against false makes a little more sense as it makes the code quite clearly self documenting:

if(TextVis == false)

But if you name the variable well as something that is obviously positive boolean, this works too:

if(!TextVisible)

Avoid naming booleans in the negative. This means "if the text is visible":

if(!TextNotVisible)

The double negatives make things harder to understand what's going on

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