4

Consider the following code snippet:

#include <cstdint>
#include <limits>
#include <iostream>

int main(void) 
{
    uint64_t a = UINT32_MAX;
    std::cout << "a: " << a << std::endl;
    ++a;
    std::cout << "a: " << a << std::endl;
    uint64_t b = (UINT32_MAX) + 1;
    std::cout << "b: " << b << std::endl;

    uint64_t c = std::numeric_limits<uint32_t>::max();

    std::cout << "c: " << c << std::endl;

    uint64_t d = std::numeric_limits<uint32_t>::max() + 1; 
    std::cout << "d: " << d << std::endl;
    return 0; 
}

Which gives the following output:

a: 4294967295
a: 4294967296
b: 0
c: 4294967295
d: 0

Why are b and d both 0? I cannot seem to find an explanation for this.

5
  • 11
    It's like when a clock is at 23:59:59 and one more second ticks by. The clock now reads 00:00:00 – john Jul 10 '20 at 6:35
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    Concerning uint64_t b = (UINT32_MAX) + 1;: UINT32_MAX is an uint32_t, 1 is of type int. This makes the + a 32 bit addition. Due to wrap-around you get 0 which is then (implicitly) converted to (uint64_t)0. (Similar for uint64_t d = std::numeric_limits<uint32_t>::max() + 1;) – Scheff's Cat Jul 10 '20 at 6:36
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    Maybe you're confused because all your variables are uint64_t but that doesn't mean that the calculation on the right hand side will be 64 bit. That is still a 32 bit calculation which overflows as I indicated. – john Jul 10 '20 at 6:37
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    You may try instead: uint64_t b = (UINT32_MAX) + (uint64_t)1;. Making at least one argument a "larger" type will force the other to be implicitly converted (due to type promotion). – Scheff's Cat Jul 10 '20 at 6:42
  • Thank you I was not aware that it would say Uint32_t + 1 and then to uint64_t thanks all and @john :p thanks XD – Lars Nielsen Jul 10 '20 at 7:10
5

This behaviour is referred to as an overflow. uint32_t takes up 4 bytes or 32 bits of memory. When you use UINT32_MAX you are setting each of the 32 bits to 1 which is the maximum value 4 bytes of memory can represent. 1 is an integer literal which typically takes up 4 bytes of memory too. So you're basically adding 1 to the maximum value 4 bytes can represent. This is how the maximum value looks like in memory:

1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111

When you add one to this, there is no more room to represent one greater than the maximum value and hence all bits are set to 0 and back to their minimum value. Although you're assigning to a uint64_t that has twice the capacity of uint32_t, it is only assigned after the addition operation is complete. The addition operation checks the types of both the left and the right operands and this is what decides the type of the result. If atleast one value were of type uint64_t, the other operand would automatically be promoted to uint64_t too. If you do:

 (UINT32_MAX) + (uint64_t)1;

or:

 (unint64_t)(UINT32_MAX) + 1;

, you'll get what you expect. In languages like C#, you can use a checked block to check for overflow and prevent this from happening implicitly.

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    Thank you I didn't know the overflow would happen at the + thanks a lot :) – Lars Nielsen Jul 10 '20 at 7:08
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    It's not referred to as overflow in the Standard . It's well-defined behaviour and unsigned arithmetic is defined as modular arithmetic – M.M Jul 10 '20 at 7:09
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    @M.M thanks :) I have missed it in the standard then :) – Lars Nielsen Jul 10 '20 at 7:12
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    @amal-k can you explain why it is not an issue for UINT8_MAX and UINT16_MAX – Lars Nielsen Jul 10 '20 at 8:06
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    Also, it is worth noting that even if both the operands were uint8_t or uint16_t, like: (UINT8_MAX + (uint8_t)1) or (UINT16_MAX + (uint16_t)1) , the result will still be promoted to int. Any operation on numeric types smaller than int will promote the result to int. – Amal K Jul 10 '20 at 9:23

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